Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 5, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for James K. Lee or search for James K. Lee in all documents.

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The crops. --In a recent trip through Russell, Scott, Lee and Wise, we took pains to inquire as to the prospect of the crops. Rye, Oats and Wheat are all harvested. The Wheat crop is represented to be one of the finest ever raised. The Rye is equally good, but the dry weather in June cut short the Oats: though generally well filled and heavy, the straw is short. The prospect for Corn is unusually fine. Having heard many conflicting reports from farmers in this county, we are unprepared to venture an opinion as to the general result.--Abingdon Dem.
is sent for the purpose of obtaining from you a permit for Mr. H. S. McGraw and myself to pass your times to obtain the body of Col. Cameron, who fell in the action of yesterday. My solicitude in this matter is an impulse of private character. The rigid rules established in Washington with reference to flags of truce prevent me from carrying out my wishes without proceeding as I am now doing. I believe General B. will recollect me while a resident in New Orleans; but if President Davis, Gen. Lee, Gen. Johnston, Gen. Wigfall, Colonels Miles, Keitt, or Withers, are present, they will not hesitate to vouch for me. General Bouham, and in fact nearly all your officers, know me. In addition to the gratification of performing a sacred duty. I would be highly delighted to meet in your camp many of my most valued friends. It is proper for me to add that I have not been in any manner connected with the action of the Government here, and that I am a neutral. Very respectfully, yours, &c.,
Funeral. --The remains of Capt. James K. Lee, of Company B, 1st Regiment Virginia Volunteers, who died from wounds received at the battle at Bull Run on the 18th of July, were conveyed to their last resting place on yesterday, attended by a military escort, and the members of Dove Lodge of Masons to which he belonged. CaptCapt. Lee, by his urbane and courteous demeanor, had endeared himself to a large number of friends. He died much lamented. His walk and conversation was that of the unassuming Christian and kindhearted gentleman. His blood lies at the door of those who originated the present wicked and unholy war. His memory is enshrined in the heare unassuming Christian and kindhearted gentleman. His blood lies at the door of those who originated the present wicked and unholy war. His memory is enshrined in the hearts of all true Virginians. None knew him but to love him. Capt. Lee was a son of the late Hancock Lee, for many years Teller in the Farmers' Bank of Virginia.