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The Daily Dispatch: December 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
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. The army is safe, intact, and existing, to serve as a nucleus around which reinforcements may rally. The column which Sherman has sent to the South is supposed to have gone in search of the prisoners, which, thus far, he has failed to capture. We do not think he is likely to find them. With his main force he is already moving north; his object being, no doubt, to pass through South and North Carolina, and, as far as he can, destroy all the communications between those regions and General Lee's army. It appears to be thought by many that the winter, and the bad weather, will impede his advance to unite with Grant. We are not of that opinion — at least, we place no great faith in such allies as wind and weather. They have proved treacherous too often since the commencement of this war. Besides, we read that in the campaign of January February, 1781, between Cornwallis and Green — over this same ground — the rains and the high water did, by no means, put an end to military ev<
ation, gathered from that officer in conversation: The rebels lost six generals at Franklin — Strahl, Granbury, Cleburne, Gist, Adams, and another, whose name is not remembered. General W. A. Quarles had his arm shattered, General John C. Brown was wounded in the thigh, and five other generals were wounded, whose names are not recollected. General Cheatham's corps bore the brunt of the fight, as the provost marshal's roll of prisoners shows, and lost three thousand men; Stewart and Lee's corps lost two thousand, making the grand total of the rebel loss five thousand, by the acknowledgment of one of their leading generals. General Cheatham stated that Hood's force, when he reached Nashville, was thirty-five thousand strong. We have no doubt that this statement is correct. Rebel officers at the penitentiary say that Hood had no expectation of an attack on Thursday, and that all of them were astonished at General Thomas's forward movement on that day. Judging from Gener
Two hundred dollars reward. --Left the residence of the undersigned, in this city, on Tuesday morning, 27th instant, his servant boy, Sam. Said boy is about five feet six or seven inches high; light gingerbread color; about fifteen years old; quite likely and intelligent; with short woolly hair. He has been employed for a few months as an officer's servant, and it is probable that he is now with General Lee's army in that capacity. The above reward will be paid for his delivery at the Tredegar Iron Works or any jail in this city. William E.L Tanner. de 29--5t*
Two hundred dollars reward. --The above reward will be given for the apprehension and delivery of Tom, a stout built man, about twenty-five years old, dark skin, about five feet four inches high, and wears whiskers. I understand he has been seen in Manchester during the last two or three weeks. If caught, to be delivered to me in Chesterfield, or to Lee & Bowman, in Richmond. James W. Martin, Executor of James Martin. de 28--eod6t
Two likely young Negro Women for sale. --Pursuant to the decree of the Richmond Hustings Court, entered on the 23d December, 1864, in the suit of Jacob's executors against Jacob and others, we shall, on the 29th day of December, 1864, at 10 o'clock A. M., at the auction-rooms for slaves of Lee & Bowman, in the city of Richmond, sell at public auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, the slaves, Jane and Lizzie, mentioned in said decree, and belonging to the estate of John Jacob, deceased. These slaves are sold for the purpose of a division among the legatees Jacob B. Keesee, Executors. Caleb Jacob, Executors. de 27--3t*