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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 16 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
than have been or can be found to prove that it was intended for political electioneering (Lib. 9: 86). Considering the attempt to deduce a particular form of political influence from the general profession on that head, Mr. Child asked, Would any one prescribe the way in which to encourage the religious improvement of the people of color, also enjoined by the Constitution? Joshua Leavitt's candid view in opposition to Birney may be read in Lib. 9: 63; and see Mr. Garrison's rejoinder to Luther Lee's review of his reply to Birney (Lib. 9 141, 143). Still, Mr. Garrison expected to see abolitionists at the ballot-box, renovating the political action of the country, though the reformation must come, not by attempting to prove that it is the duty of every abolitionist to be a voter, but that it is the duty of every voter to be an abolitionist. He expected, further, to see political action purified and renovated in exact proportion to the prevalence of the great conservative doctrine
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
onsistency. He is determined, like E. Wright, Leavitt & Co., to lay all the opposition to the political party scheme to Non-Resistance. I would send you extracts from his writings to demonstrate his former position, but I have them not by me. Lee and Leavitt are expected in Philadelphia to attend the Luther Lee, J. Leavitt. meeting of the State Society. I rather think it will be a stormy time if they come. Whittier is here, and will be here at the meeting. . . . Thomas Earle informedLuther Lee, J. Leavitt. meeting of the State Society. I rather think it will be a stormy time if they come. Whittier is here, and will be here at the meeting. . . . Thomas Earle informed me and Bradburn, who is here, Geo. Bradburn. last night, that he should not accept the nomination unless they would form a democratic party. His views are most radical. He will not go with any party that will not go for universal suffrage; poverty and crime constitute no forfeiture of suffrage, in his opinion. So he said last night. He goes against all customs and tariffs. There is great excitement respecting the meeting in New York: generally opposed to the doings at Albany, and to all
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
nts as the only authentic record of faith and duty—in other words, that Bible proofs should alone be in order. This was discussed by Alcott, May, Garrison, the Rev. Luther Lee, the Rev. N. Colver, the Rev. John Pierpont, the Rev. Samuel Osgood, the Rev. Theodore Parker, and others, and did not prevail with the meeting. Garrison, nal malice at full length—C. T. Torrey, who said very little to the purpose—Dr. Osgood, of Springfield, Samuel Osgood. who reasoned fairly and in good temper. Luther Lee was also on hand, charged to the muzzle with logic, but, unfortunately, he could not get an opportunity to fire it off. Bro. Hawley Rev. Silas Hawley. He tocal politicians as possible to harangue the people of the Tenth District, in opposition to the claims of Mr. Borden. . . . There were Rev. Messrs. Torrey, Cummings, Lee, Phelps, Denison, Leavitt,--all in a row! We believe the business of a politician to be a very poor and paltry one, and the less a minister of the gospel has to do<
S. party, 310; at quarterly meeting Mass. A. S. S., 287, 288; reads non-resistants out of ranks, 289, 294; reply from G., 300-305, from Leavitt, 304, defended by L. Lee, 304; opposes enrolment of women, 297; resolutions on political duty, 299; Third Party views opposed by L. Tappan, 312; declines Warsaw nomination for President, dits Ballot-Box, 418; opposes Borden's reelection, 437.—Letter from G. Smith, 2.319. Le Bosquet, John, Rev. [b. Haverhill, Mass., May 13, 1811], 2.271. Lee, Luther, Rev. [b. Schoharie, N. Y., Nov. 30, 1800], defence of Birney, 2.304, Third Party activity, 343, 437, at Chardon St. Convention, 425, 427. Lee, Samuel, 2.210. ro-slavery pastoral letter, 1.477; Gen. Conference censures abolitionists, 2.78, rules out slave testimony, 350; growth of A. S. sentiment, 243.—See also W. Fisk, L. Lee, O. Scott, G. Storrs, La Roy Sunderland, D. Wise. Miller, —, Rev. (N. Y.), 1.317. Miller, Jonathan P., at World's Convention, 2.370, 382. Miller, Tobias H.<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
. Alden to London Committee. conducting the Massachusetts Abolitionist, who brought the most cruel accusations against Collins's integrity and manhood; and by Phelps, who dressed up Mrs. Chapman's report of his own remarks at the Chardon-Street Convention, and gave his personal coloring to what was said by others—all to prove the Convention's infidel character and Mr. Garrison's complicity. This he first ventilated in the New England Christian Advocate, Edited in Lowell, Mass., by the Rev. Luther Lee. and Lib. 11.79. then despatched abroad through the sectarian channels controlled by the London Committee. Mr. Garrison's reply was prompt, and warmed with a natural Lib. 11.43. indignation, for to the charge of infidelity were added fresh insinuations of no marriage doctrines, calculated to Ante, 2.289. horrify still more the English mind. In fact, Phelps's Mss. Apr. 3, 1841, J. A. Collins to W. L. G., May 2, 1841, E. Pease to Collins. priestly candor and magnanimity proved mor
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, The woman's rights movement and its champions in the United States. (search)
rivate reading and study, preaching and lecturing on various reforms. In 1850 she attended the convention in Worcester, Massachusetts, and made a speech on the enfranchisement of woman. She preached whenever and wherever opportunity offered, without regard to sect,--alike in the church at Andover, Music Hall, in Boston, or public halls in Worcester, Cincinnati, and No w York. In 1853 she was ordained pastor of a Congregational church in South Butler, Wayne County, New York. The Rev. Luther Lee, Wesleyan minister of Syracuse, preached the ordination sermon. Gerrit Smith and Samuel J. May took part in the ceremonies. Then, says Mrs. Blackwell, in a note to me recently, Dr. Cheever openly branded me and my South Butler Church as infidels; and the New York Independent sustained him, and would only publish a crumb of my reply. We are happy to say that our noble young friend, Theodore Tilton, was not then editor of that journal. Miss Brown remained in South Butler but