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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
e affairs of the Association. On motion of General Early, Misses Mary and Mildred Lee, Mrs. Thomas J. Jackson and her daughter, and Mrs. J. E. B. Stuart and her dsaster only to be conjectured from his magnanimity in ultimate success. But General Lee demonstrated by the reluctance with which he took up arms, and the brilliancgod did seem to set his seal, To give the world assurance of a man! When General Lee announced to the Army of Northern Virginia the death of General Jackson, he liar emphasis, the dead captain—courage and confidence in God. We feel, said General Lee, that his spirit still lives, and will inspire the whole army with his indom But he was not more self-confident than modest. It is related that when General Lee's note of condolence, telling him that for the good of the country he had preing wounded himself was read to him, he exclaimed, Better ten Jacksons than one Lee! Thus did these two great compeers vie in modesty, and unselfish admiration,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of campaign against Grant in North Mississippi in 1862-63. (search)
as much strengthened in the mind of General Price, when, on the 24th of September, he received by flag of truce a summons from General Ord to surrender. General Ord stated in his letter that recent information showed that McClellan had destroyed Lee's army at Antietam; that, therefore, the rebellion must soon terminate, and that in order to spare the useless effusion of blood, he gave Price this opportunity to lay down his arms. Price replied to Ord that he was glad to be able to inform him s. We had been bloodily repulsed; but Price's corps had made an honest fight and lost no honor in the battle. General Van Dorn seemed to feel he had deserved the victory. In a manly spirit he assumed all responsibility for his failure; like General Lee at Gettysburg, he reproached nobody. During the whole battle he was close to his troops about the centre of his lines, where the fighting was most active and constant; and not a movement was made without his knowledge and direction, except t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ceremonies connected with the unveiling of the statue of General Robert E. Lee, at Lee circle, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 22, 1884. (search)
ersons in attendance were the President of the Confederate States, Jefferson Davis, his daughters, and Misses Mary and Mildred Lee, daughters of the great soldier and patriot, in whose honor the monument was erected. The associations of the armies of the storm, the event was greeted by the famous Washington Artillery, the monument was unveiled by a private soldier of Lee's army, who, at the suggestion of Miss Lee, in herself declining the honor, had been selected to perform this duty. ImmMiss Lee, in herself declining the honor, had been selected to perform this duty. Immediately a meeting of the Directors was held at the Washington artillery armory, of the proceedings of which the following official minute gives a full account and forms the appropriate close of this sketch: Official minutes of the Association. on by the storm of the immense audience gathered to participate in the ceremonies attending the unveiling of the statue of Lee, the Directors of this Association met at the Washington Artillery Hall to determine what course should be pursued with re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel Eugene Waggaman, who led the Tenth Louisiana regiment in the famous charge at Malvern Hill. [New Orleans Picayune, February 10th, 1889.] (search)
. This was willingly granted. The flag had to be surrendered, but a piece could be taken from it. With that sword which had saved his life at Malvern Hill he cut a section including the lateral side and two stars. This he has sacredly preserved with the same old saddle-bag and papers in which it was placed, to be transmitted as his most valuable heirloom to his children. Only one person has ever induced him to part with a portion of it. That one was the daughter of his old commander—Miss Mildred Lee. He gave her, some twelve years ago, a small piece, including one of the stars, and in return received a splendid portrait of her father. At Appomattox every respect was shown the Louisiana soldiers. At the surrender they marched with heads as erect as ever. When they impinged on the line of the conquering army, the victors shouldered arms with grave faces on which was neither smile of cynicism nor suggestion of the defeat of their adversaries. Colonel Waggaman returned to New
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Two cavalry Chieftains. [New Orleans Picayune, August 12th, 1888.] (search)
a reconnoissance. Sheridan came back and, in making his verbal report, alluded to a brush he had with Stuart's cavalry. Never mind Stuart, said Meade, interrupting, he will do about as he pleases anyhow. Go on and tell what you discovered about Lee's forces. That made Sheridan mad and he retorted: Damn Stuart, I can thrash hell out of him any day. Those were times, you know, when men's utterances, like their deeds, were not fashioned upon the models of these days of peace. Meade repeaterk to Grant, who asked, Why didn't you tell him to do it? Not long after, Sheridan got an order to cross the river, engage Stuart and clean him out. I knew I could whip him, said Sheridan, if I could only get him where he could not fall back on Lee's infantry, so I thought the matter over, and to draw him on, started straight for Richmond. We moved fast and Stuart dogged us right at our heels. We kept on a second day straight for Richmond, and the next morning found Stuart in front of us,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, 70. Lartigue, Gen. G. B., 117, 396. Latham, Gen. R., 83. Latrobe, Col., Osman, 107. Lauman, Col J. G., 80. Laurel Hill, 87. Law, Gen. E. M.,384, 386. Lawrence, Sergeant, 104. Lawton, Gen. A. R., 273. Lawton, Mr., 174. Lay, Col. John F., Address of, 207. Lead Mines—Max Meadows, 60; Wytheville, 288. Lecky's England, cited, 33. Le Conte, 428. Leftwich, A. T. 105. Lee, Capt., 166. Lee, Gen., Fitzhugh, 226, 231, 354, 453. Lee, Gen., Harry, 9. Lee, L. S., 175. Lee, Miss, Mildred, 450. Lee, Gen. R. E., 9, 30, 58, 67, 83, 107, 112, 129, 203, 261, 274, 385, 358, 395; Letter of, 228. Lee, Richard Henry, 429. Lee, Gen. Stephen D., 88, 166, 274, 373. Lee Camp Soldiers' Home, 194. Lee's Memoirs, cited, 9. Legare, 104. Legare, E. T., 395. Lesemann, F. W., 395 Lesesne, Lt., Charles, 174. Lesesne, Lt. F. J., 137, 143, 155, 165,68; killed, 191, 193. Letcher, Gov., John, 84. Lewis, Col., 114. Lewis, Hon. D. P., 275. Lexington, Va., in 1861, 37.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
L. M. Curry, and Mr. John Dunlop. During the exercises the following persons had seats on this stand: General A. L. Long of Virginia; Colonel Charles S. Venable, University of Virginia; Colonel Walter H. Taylor, Norfolk; Colonel Charles Marshall, Baltimore; and Colonel T. M. R. Talcott, Richmond—all members of General R. E. Lee's staff; Generals Charles W. Field of Kentucky, D. A. Weisiger of Virginia, and Dabney H. Maury of Virginia, Mr. Calderon Carlisle of Washington, Misses Mary and Mildred Lee, Mrs. Fitzhugh Lee, Mrs. W. H. F. Lee, Miss Ellen Lee, Miss Lizzie Gaines of Warrenton, Mrs. Dr. Stone of Washington, Mrs. Ellen Daingerfield of Alexandria, Mrs. Senator Hearst of California, Mrs. Peyton Wise, Colonel Hemphill of South Carolina, General Bradley T. Johnson of Maryland, Congressman Breckinridge of Arkansas, Honorable Thomas G. Skinner of North Carolina, Colonel C. O'B. Cowardin of Virginia, Colonel Gregory of the Stonewall brigade, Colonel L. Daingerfield Lewis of Virginia,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
st suffering with the least hope of reward is worthy of the highest honor, they deserve to stand shoulder to shoulder with Lee and his lieutenants in the brotherhood of glory. Zzzhonored by true and brave. They are honored by all the true and greeted the sight of the palmetto from many a balcony and pavement met with a hearty response from the visitors. Miss Mildred Lee and Mesdames Janney and DeSaussure, who had managed the South Carolina table at the memorial bazaar, were greeted with hearty cheers, and presented with palmetto cockades. Miss Lee gave several of the veterans some exquisite carnations, which will be carried back to Charleston and treasured for many a day. Captain James G. Holmes brought with him a wreath of l The visitors were received with the characteristic welcome of the city; tried comrades were re-united in many homes, and Lee Camp of Confederate Veterans fed nearly 4,000. The crowning event of the memorable day was the brilliant reception in t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The South's Museum. (search)
. Colston, third vice-president; Mrs. E. D. Hotchkiss, honorary vice-president; Mrs. M. S. Smith, treasurer; Mrs. Stephen Putney, recording secretary; Mrs. Lizzie C. Daniel, corresponding secretary; Mrs. James R. Werth, chairman of Committee on Relics; Mrs. Hunter McGuire. Solid South. Mrs. V. Jefferson Davis, Regent; Miss May Greer Baughman, Vice-Regent; Mrs. Frank T. Crump, alternate. Committee: Mrs. Jas. D. Crump, Miss Minnie Baughman, Miss Mary Quarles. Virginia room. Miss Mildred Lee, Regent; Mrs. J. Taylor Ellyson, Vice Regent; Mrs. J. B. Lightfoot, alternate. In the east room, which is the Virginia room, refreshments were served to all desiring them at small cost. The menu was a particularly fine one, the qualities of the coffee particularly appealing to the general taste. In this room hospitalities were extended by Mrs. George West, Mrs. James Gordon, Mrs. Randolph Norris, Miss Ann C. Bentley, Mrs. Bowden, Mrs. Little, Mrs. R. S. Christian, Mrs. Smith Redfor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
This was willingly granted. The flag had to be surrendered, but a piece could be taken from it. With that sword which had saved his life at Malvern Hill he cut a section, including the lateral side and two stars. This he has sacredly preserved, with the same old saddle-bag and papers in which it was placed, to be transmitted as his most valuable heirloom to his children. Only one person has ever induced him to part with a portion of it. That one was the daughter of his old commander—Miss Mildred Lee. He gave her, some twelve years ago, a small piece, including one of the stars, and in return received a splendid portrait of her father. At Appomattox every respect was shown the Louisiana soldiers. At the surrender they marched with heads as erect as ever. When they impinged on the line of the conquering enemy the victors shouldered arms with grave faces, on which was neither smile nor cynicism, nor suggestion of the defeat of their adversaries. Colonel Waggaman returned to N
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