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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
's grave, 410; failing health, 411; sickness and death, 412; public funeral, 414; equestrian statue in Richmond, 415; marble statue in Lexington, 416; tributes to his memory, 416-418; his military character, 420; a great soldier, 422. Lee, General William H. F., mentioned, 29, 118, 121, 122, 261; captured, 305; mentioned, 321, 371. Lee, John, mentioned, 5. Lee, Lancelot, mentioned, 2. Lee, Lionel, mentioned, 2. Lee, Mary Custis, mentioned, 25, 26, 71, 106, 381, 411, 412. Lee, Philip, 5. Lee, Philip Ludwell, 5, 16. Lee, Richard, 2, 3, 4, 5. Lee, Richard Henry, 6, 8, 83. Lee, Robert, mentioned, 93, 108, 132, 217, 323. Lee, Stephen D., mentioned, 194. Lee, Sydney Smith, mentioned, 36, 37, 45, 76, 89, 139. Lee, Thomas, mentioned, 5, 6. Lees of Virginia, 2, Letcher, Governor, John, mentioned, 90, 101, 126, 318. Liberty Hall Academy, 405. Ligny, battle of, 424. Lincoln, Abraham, elected President, 83; mentioned, 96, 103, 136, 137, 157, 166, 169,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 170 (search)
t was freely used all along the line upon both sides. The troops met were confessedly among the best of the rebel army, were superior in point of numbers, and had the advantage of works and artillery. I can give no accurate account of the number of prisoners captured, as by far the greatest number were sent to the rear without guards, as I had only men enough to fight the armed rebels in front. Among my prisoners, however, were Colonel Smith, commanding Sixth and Seventh Arkansas; Lieut. Col. Philip Lee, commanding Second Kentucky; Major Maxson, commanding Sixth Kentucky, besides a large number of commissioned officers. Captain Newman, of my staff, delivered 26 commissioned officers and 196 enlisted men over to corps headquarters, and Captain Mills, of the Eighteenth Regulars, informed me he had in addition secured some 350 rebels running to the rear, who were captured by my brigade. Lieutenant Kuder, Seventyfourth Indiana, with his own hand, captured the colors and color bearer
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
en. Bate's division, Maj.-Gen. William B. Bate, Maj.-Gen. John C. Brown. Escort, Lieut. James H. Buck. Lewis's Brigade, Assigned to Jackson's cavalry division September 4th. Brig.-Gen. Joseph H. Lewis: 2d Ky., Col. J. W. Moss, Lieut.-Col. Philip Lee, Capt. Joel Higgins; 4th Ky., Lieut.-Col. T. W. Thompson; 5th Ky., Lieut.-Col. H. Hawkins, Lieut.-Col. G. W. Connor, Maj. William Mynhier; 6th Ky., Maj. G. W. Moxson, Col. M. H. Cofer, Capt. Richard P. Finn; 9th Ky., Col. J. W. Caldwell. ebane, Lieut. J. W. Phillips; La. Battery, Lieut. W. C. D. Vaught, Capt. C. I. Slocomb, Lieut. J. A. Chalaron. Palmer's Battalion: Ala. Battery, Capt. C. L. Lurmsden; Ga. Battery, Capt. R. W. Anderson; Ga. Battery, Capt. M. W. Havis. Hood's (or Lee's) Corps, Lieut.-Gen. John B. Hood, Maj.-Gen. C. L. Stevenson, Maj.-Gen. B. F. Cheatham, Lieut.-Gen. S. D. Lee. Hindman's division, Maj.-Gen. T. C. Hindman, Brig.-Gen. John C. Brown, Maj.-Gen. Patton Anderson, Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson. Escor
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
ee, and about eight miles from Guthrie, Ky. This recruiting station was named Camp Boone, and here was organized during the summer the nucleus of the famous brigade of infantry known during the war and still designated as the Orphan Brigade. Col. Phil. Lee, Maj. J. W. Hewett, Col. Robert A. Johnson, Gen. Thomas H. Taylor and Col. William Preston Johnston were among the most active in recruiting companies in Louisville. The first three became officers of the Second regiment, while the last two Covington, was quartermaster and R. C. Wintersmith, of Elizabethtown, commissary, Dr. B. M. Wible, surgeon, and Rev. Joseph Desha Pickett, chaplain. The captains were, in alphabetical order of companies, James W. Moss, Robert J. Breckinridge, Phil. Lee, L. S. Slayden, Stephen E. Chipley, Hervey McDowell, John S. Hope, Anson Madeira, Gustavus Dedman, and John W. Owings. The Third regiment, Thompson's, was also organized at Camp Boone shortly after the Second, with the following officers com
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
of General McClellan in the east had been at this time in marked contrast, and confidence had grown sanguine that he would succeed in his operations against Richmond. But McClellan's advance had resulted in his defeat at Seven Pines on May 30th. Lee's great victories in the Seven Days battles followed, and the Federal armies were forced to retreat. Political necessity and the popular discontent required that the army of the West should shake off its lethargy. A campaign in the West on a lfront of it did not seem to have any very high opinion. In fact, he scarcely thought it worth going after, although not more than a day or two's march south of him. He was yearning for bigger game and doubtless looking forward then to meeting General Lee, as he did later in the Second Manassas campaign as the successor of General McClellan, with his headquarters in the saddle. General Pope, whose special province it was to keep his eye on Beauregard, when interrogated by General Halleck as t
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
the mountains by Rogers' Gap with four brigades of infantry, 6,000 strong and march directly upon Cumberland Ford. At the same time Heth, with the artillery and subsistence trains and two brigades, moves by Big Creek Gap upon Barboursville and Stevenson moves up and takes position close to the Gap in front. Scott, with 900 cavalry and a battery of mountain howitzers, left Kingston yesterday and should reach London, Ky., Sunday. It was the most brilliant conception of the war, as bold as Lee's move to Gettysburg, and requiring the dash and nerve of Stonewall Jackson. Besides, it was not a single column; it was four, the failure of either one involving disaster and possible destruction to all. His route was through a mountainous country depleted of supplies by both armies, and covering the territory in which Zollicoffer had lost his life and Crittenden's army had been annihilated; through which also Thomas and Schoepf and Morgan had for a year tried to cover the ground, which he,
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
d towards Chattanooga, aiming to intercept Rosecrans and cut him off from his stronghold. On the afternoon of the 18th of September he crossed Chickamauga creek at Lee & Gordon's mill, with the view of throwing himself across the main road leading from Crawfish Springs to Chattanooga. Thomas, divining his purpose, crossed the crethe 19th found Bragg in the act of forming his line in a direction generally parallel with the road to Chattanooga, with his left wing resting on the Chickamauga at Lee & Gordon's mill. General Buckner's corps was placed on the left, with Preston's division at Lee & Gordon's mill, and Stewart's on his right. General Longstreet, whLee & Gordon's mill, and Stewart's on his right. General Longstreet, whose corps had arrived from Virginia the day before, was on Buckner's right Hill's corps and Polk's corps were still on the east side of the Chickamauga. While General Bragg was making his alignment on the morning of the 19th his right came in contact with part of the Federal forces under General Thomas, and a heavy engagement ens
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
tanooga by Bragg General Rosecrans displaced by General Grant battle of Missionary Ridge General Buckner assigned to the Transmississippi department General Preston appointed minister to Mexico and General Breckinridge assigned to the department of southwest Virginia sad parting of the latter with the Kentucky brigade General Joseph E. Johnston Succeeds Bragg his compliment to the brigade Breckinridge's service in Virginia his victory over Sigel at New Market his ovation from General Lee's army battle of Second Cold Harbor Monocacy in sight of Washington City Shenandoah valley campaign return to his department Kentucky troops there and operations made Secretary of war succeeding events. The second day after the battle, General Bragg moved up to within cannon-shot of Chattanooga, where Rosecrans, reassured by the failure of pursuit and the strength of the defenses which Bragg had constructed, suspended his movements for retreat inaugurated in the Federal pa
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
861—Blanton Duncan, Lieutenant-Colonel, October 14, 1861—Thomas H. Taylor, Lieutenant-Colonel, July 3, 1861—Wm. Preston Johnston, Lieutenant-Colonel, October 14, 1861—Edward Crossland, Lieutenant-Colonel, April 19, 1861—Benjamin Anderson, Major. Second Regiment Kentucky infantry: James M. Hawes, Colonel, July 17, 1861—Roger W. Hanson, Colonel, 1861—Robert A. Johnson, Lieutenant-Colonel, July 17, 1861—James W. Hewitt, Major, July 17, 1861—James W. Moss, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, Colonel—Philip Lee, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, Colonel—Hervey McDowell, Major—Joel Higgins, Major. Third Regiment Kentucky infantry: Lloyd Tilghman, Colonel, July 5, 1861—Albert P. Thompson, Colonel, October 25, 1861—G. A. C. Holt, Colonel, March 25, 1864 —Alfred Johnston, Major and Lieutenant-Colonel—James H. Bowman, Major-Al. McGoodwin, Major. Fourth Regiment Kentucky infantry: Robert P. Trabue, Colonel, September 23, 1861—Andrew R. Hynes, Lieutenant-Colonel, September 23,
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
Returning to Bragg he participated in the battle of Chickamauga and succeeded D. H. Hill in command of an army corps, in this capacity serving at Missionary Ridge. Then going into Virginia, he defeated Sigel at New Market May 15, 1864, joined General Lee in the campaign of that summer, protected the communications during Sheridan's raid, and did good service at Cold Harbor. In conjunction with General Early he discomfited the Federals under Hunter in the Shenandoah valley and made the campaigat hand, on the next day he began to retire toward Martin's Mill. In May he defeated the Federals under J. D. Cox at Princeton, Va., and saved to Confederate use the Lynchburg & Knoxville railroad, for which service he received the thanks of General Lee. On the 16th of June he resigned his commission, but was reappointed June 20th, to date from his first commission. He was subsequently elected to the Confederate Congress as a representative from Kentucky, and served on the military committe
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