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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 193 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 176 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 146 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 86 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Present: (search)
sissippi, Kentucky and Tennessee. Next the Mexican war, preceded by the adventurous help for Texas rendered by Lamar, Houston, Fannin, Crockett and other like spirits from Tennessee and Georgia, when the blood of the South crimsoned the Alamo, and afterward freely flowed in all battles from Palo Alto to the ancient city of the Montezumas, and in which the troops of the American Union were led to victory by such men as Pierce, Butler, Zachary Taylor, Wingfield Scott, Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee. In that war of so much importance to the Republic the reports show: Northern volunteers, twenty-three thousand and eighty-four, and Southern volunteers, forty-four thousand six hundred and forty. Thus, while the South has multiplied the stars on the flag of the Nation, it has deepened the crimson of the stripes with its blood. Having done its best in every battle, having given its Washington to lead the armies of the Colonies, its Jackson to win the second victory over England, its T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
istorian will ever say of him what has been said of Wellington, that Waterloo is a battle of the first class, won by a captain of the second. Hampton's brave men who dared to follow where he dared to lead saw no Waterloo, because that expressive word of defect was not written in their vocabulary. Napoleon said that detail facts belong rather to the biography of regiments than to the history of the army. I will, therefore, try to deal in facts as I remember them. In January, 1865, General Lee ordered Lieutenant-General Hampton, with General M. C. Butler and two of his brigades (Young's and Dunovant's) from the A. N. V. to meet Sherman at Columbia, where General Wheeler was to report to General Hampton upon his arrival. Each general had a squad of scouts, who were brave and courageous men. I will give their names as I remember them: General Hampton's scouts were G. D. Shadbourn, sergeant commanding; Bob Shiver, W. W. Miller, D. F. Tanner, Phil Hutchinson, Jim Doolin, Jim Guff
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last battle of the late war. [from the times-democrat, September 8, 1895.] (search)
tle of the late war. [from the times-democrat, September 8, 1895.] Personal Reminiscences. I was ordered to report to Brigadier-General Henry W. Allen, of Louisiana, at his special request; being unable to do so, the order was rescinded. Par. IV, S. P., No. 275. January 5, 1864, I was ordered to relieve Major E. W. Baylor, post-quartermaster West Point, Georgia, where I remained until the fall of that plucky little city, which event took place a week after the surrender of General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox. West Point, Georgia, a town of some importance to our armies, on the banks of the Chattahoochee River, being the key to the sitution at this juncture, was splendidly fortified against attacks by stockades, redoubts and long-range rifle pits, and by the erection of a large fort on the west side of the river. The fort commanded a great portion of the place, and under more favorable conditions would have proved a veritable Gibraltar. This fort was manned by a portion
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
y men who were already prominent in one or other of the two armies which were then organizing. He had been a fellow-student of Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Robert E. Lee, and of the newly-elected President of the Confederacy, Mr. Davis. Some time after this company was organized another company formed near Fairfield, and att, occasionally marching northward, and engaged in picket duty. While at Rude's Hill, we were joined, on March 28th, by John R. Hummerickhouse, Ed. H. Hyde, Robert E. Lee, Jr., Arthur Robinson, and March 31st, by Francis T. Herndon. About April 20th, the battery arrived at the western entrance to Swift Run gap, at the foot of tty of Virginia, and was professor of ancient languages at William and Mary College, where he died. John P. Hummerickhouse, appointed hospital steward. Robert E. Lee, Jr., appointed lieutenant of cavalry, November 13, 1862. William M. Otey, appointed lieutenant signal corps, October 10, 1862. J. Howard Smith, transferre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
ved Grant would assault him again at this same point. It was very uncomfortable and beginning to be quite warm and dusty, and good water was scarce. But General Lee caused full rations of onions to be issued, causing the men to cheer as if they had gained another victory. While occupying the trenches at Cold Harbor, our headquarters being in a ditch a few feet from the line, General Martin had a visit from a General Smith, an engineer officer, serving with the Commander-in-chief, General R. E. Lee. Old army soldiers, they greeted each other familiarly as Smith and Martin. In my presence General Smith said: Martin, I come to you with a message from General Lee, who desires me to say that he regrets that his duties prevent his calling on you in person to say that he is glad to hear you have come to his army. He directs me to come, not through your major-general, but directly to you, to say that he is deeply concerned about this point in the line occupied by your brigade, which
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Events leading up to the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
Association of Washington, D. C., on its celebration of the birth-day of General R. E. Lee, January, 1896. The Dispatch has secured for publication the address ois strictly complied with. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Letters to Ewell. On the same day General Lee wrote the follour position. * * * * * * I am, with great respect, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Later on the same day General Lee wrote the following letter toe same offices on your left. * * * * * * * I am, most respectfully, yours, R. E. Lee, General. The letter of General Lee to General Stuart of the 22d of June,e mentioned. It is as follows: headquarters, June 22, 1863—7.30 P. M. General R. E. Lee, Commanding, etc.. General,—Yours of 4 o'clock this afternoon was recend circumspect in your movements. I am, very respectfully and truly yours, R. E. Lee, General. This letter was written and received after General Longstreet's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
contained in the following letter: General George E. Pickett, Commanding, &c.: General,—you and your men have crowned yourselves with glory; but we have the enemy to fight, and must carefully, at this critical moment, guard against dissensions, which the reflections in your report would create. I will therefore suggest that you destroy both copy and original, substituting one confined to casualties merely. I hope all will yet be well. I am, with respect, Your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Colonel Walter Harrison, assistant adjutant and inspector-general of Pickett's Division, in Pickett's Men, published in 1870, says that the two other divisions (Heth and Pender) were to move simultaneously in support, charging in second and third lines. This indicates that there was some idea of a triple line at Pickett's headquarters, though Colonel Harrison's narrative of the battle in this and other respects is somewhat faulty. Orders misunderstood. General Pettigre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
ed to march on the flank of the column with which General Lee was present. He couldn't be on Ewell's flank on the Susquehanna and Longstreet's flank on the Potomac at the same time. Neither would Longstreet have ordered Stuart to remain with him, knowing that General Lee had ordered him to Ewell. All of Stuart's critics have ignored the fact that General Lee ordered Stuart to leave him and go to Ewell. General Longstreet wrote as follows to General Lee: June 22, 1863—7:30 P. M. General R. E. Lee, Commanding, &c.: General,—Yours of 4 o'clock this afternoon is received. I have forwarded your letter to General Stuart, with the suggestion that he pass by the enemy's rear if he thinks he may get through. We have nothing of the enemy to-day. Most respectfully, James Longstreet, Lieutenant-General, Commanding. Longstreet to Stuart. In the correspondence during this period between Lee, Longstreet, and Stuart this is the first intimation about taking the route in the re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
direction of Gettysburg via Heidlersburg, where you will have a turnpike most of the way, and you can thus join your divisions to Early's, which is east of the mountains. I think it preferable to keep on the east side of the mountains. * * * * R. E. Lee, General. I do not think this feature—the first order mentioned in the above for Ewell to retire from Carlisle on Chambersburg—has ever been noticed by historians. General Ewell, having no good reason against it, on receipt of this order ang our army on the east side of the mountains. Accordingly, Longstreet and Hill were directed to proceed from Chambersburg to Gettysburg, to which point General Ewell was also instructed to march from Carlisle. * * * Respectfully submitted, R. E. Lee, General. Moving in unison. This formal statement by General Lee made at the time, together with various orders and movements detailed in the foregoing, all compiled from official and perfectly reliable sources, determine conclusivel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
mber of prisoners were taken. General Lee was talking to the commander of his cavalry when Cook appeared, saw the combat, and expressed great pleasure at the result. The last Camp-fires. On we went to Appomattox, and I never again saw General Lee, but his image abides in my memory and heart. After dark we saw Longstreet's camp-fires twinkling on the hills on either side of the road as we passed, and these were the last camp-fires of the Army of Northern Virginia. The old boys of R. E. Lee Camp, of Richmond, occasionally hold one to keep us in mind of those real ones till all cross over the river and on fame's eternal camping-ground their silent tents are spread. Just as the dawn was breaking the next morning we moved through Appomattox Court House, greeted by shot and shell from the enemy's batteries as our column slowly advanced through the early morning mists. Finding the enemy in great force in our front, we moved off after sunrise to the right and passed around thei
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