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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 193 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 176 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 146 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 86 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
Brave defence of the Cockade City. Fight at Rives' Farm, in Prince Edward County, with the sufferings in the Northern prison of those who fell into the hands of the enemy. address by John F. Ulenn. Mr. John F. Glenn delivered the following address before R. E. Lee Camp, Confederate Veterans, on the 9th of June, 1906, and subsequently before A. P. Hill Camp, Petersburg, Va., on the defence of Petersburg in 1864, and is full of interest. It is now printed from a revised copy furnished by the author. In essaying to give an account of some personal recollections of the affair of the 9th of June, 1864, between the small force of militia and second-class reserves, under Colonel Fletcher H. Arthur, and an overwhelming force of cavalry and artillery under the Federal General August V. Kautz, at the Rives Farm, in Prince George county, and some reminiscences of prison life, it is foreign to my purpose to give anything more than a skeleton outline of conditions existing and leading up
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences. (search)
bities engendered by it are fast being buried in the grave of Oblivion — where is the gray-headed Confederate whose eve does not kindle at the remembrance of those four heroic years? Does he not feel like re-echoing the glowing words which the great dramatist puts in the mouth of Henry the Fifth the night before Agincourt, This story shall the goodman teach his son.— The that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbors, And say, To-morrow is Saint Crispin; Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars, And say, These wounds I had on Crispin's day. And does not his heart burn while he tells with pride of the days when with unfaltering steps, though weary and hungry, but with the light of battle in his eye, he followed in the lead of those illustrious captains and masters of war, A. P. Hill, Jackson, Hampton, Stuart, Mosby, Johnston, Kirby Smith and a host of other gallant spirits—and last, though not least, of Robert Edward Lee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Officers of Gen. R. E. Lee's staff. (search)
Officers of Gen. R. E. Lee's staff. Columbus, Miss., October 18, 1907. my dear Col. Talcott,—I have before me your revised, corrected and added list of Officers of General R. E. Lee's Staff, with the data furnished by General Marcus J. WGeneral R. E. Lee's Staff, with the data furnished by General Marcus J. Wright, of the War Department in Washington. As far as I know, it is now the most correct list extant, and you can safely have it published. With kind wishes, your comrade and friend, (Signed) Stephen D. Lee. General Lee's first service wlt, Vol. A. D. C.; Captain John N. Maffitt, Naval A. D. C. In March, 1862, when under a special act of Congress, General R. E. Lee was assigned to duty at Richmond, a personal staff for the Commanding General was authorized by said act, and the a, 1865. After the battle of Seven Pines, June I, 1862, in which General Jos. E. Johnston was severely wounded, General Robert E. Lee was assigned to the command of the Army of Northern Virginia, and took with him his personal staff as above named
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
but there may have been other officers with the rank of Brigadier-General as young as he was. It has been claimed that General Thomas M. Logan, of South Carolina, commissioned Brigadier-General of Cavalry, February 23, 1865, to report to General Robert E. Lee, with rank to date from February 15, 1865, was the youngest officer of the rank in the Confederate States Army. Another youthful commander is in evidence, General William R. Johnson Pegram, whose signature was W. J. Pegram. He was born ay Walker (subsequently Brigadier-General), and distinguished himself by conspicious gallantry at Manassas, Cedar Run, Chancellorville and Gettysburg, attaining the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery. Under an act of the Congress of the Confederate States he was appointed to the provisional rank of Brigadier General, in March, 1865, and ordered to report to General R. E. Lee. He was assigned to the command of a brigade, and was killed in front of Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865.—editor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
beautiful cemetery, hard by. They were born, Lee on the 19th of January, and Jackson on the 31stl on their fame to the ocean. General R. E Lee's war-horse: a sketch of Traveller by the man wright ahead soon as he was mounted. When General Lee took command of the Wise Legion and Floyd B horse, near Pocotaligo, in South Carolina, General Lee at once recognized the horse, and again inq Thereupon my brother had the horse sent to General Lee's stable. In about a month the horse was returned to my brother, with a note from General Lee stating that the animal suited him, but that hewhat it cost me. He then sold the horse to General Lee for $200 in currency, the sum of $25 having been added by General Lee to the price I gave for the horse in September, 1861, to make up for ths above mentioned and sent by my brother to General Lee. Thomas L. Broun. Charleston, W. Va., Augu86. From Gen. Fitzhuigh Lees book on Gen. Robert E. Lee, 1894. Traveller, the most distinguis[8 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E Lee's war-horse: a sketch of Traveller by the man who formerly owned him. (search)
General R. E Lee's war-horse: a sketch of Traveller by the man who formerly owned him. It has been incorrectly stated some time ago that General Lee's famous war-horse Traveller, was formerly felt in the monument about to be erected to General Lee, and many are desirous that his war-horse ssition on Big Sewell and retreat westward. General Lee was thereupon ordered to South Carolina. T horse, near Pocotaligo, in South Carolina, General Lee at once recognized the horse, and again inq Thereupon my brother had the horse sent to General Lee's stable. In about a month the horse was rig Sewell Mountain. My brother wrote me of General Lee's desire to have the horse and asked me whawhat it cost me. He then sold the horse to General Lee for $200 in currency, the sum of $25 having been added by General Lee to the price I gave for the horse in September, 1861, to make up for ths above mentioned and sent by my brother to General Lee. Thomas L. Broun. Charleston, W. Va., Augu[3 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
ly, dated it from my London club, The Athenaeum. On the afternoon of the day on which it was published came to me a most cordial letter from Gerald Smythe, Esq., one of the solicitors for the London and Northwest Railway, stating that he would greatly like to meet me, and proposing that I should at once come to his home at Putney for luncheon or dinner, or, as they say in England, to dine and sleep. He wrote me that he was an ardent Confederate ; had long been a correspondent of Captain Robert E. Lee, of Romancoke, and added that, if I would come he could promise me a sight that would vividly recall to me the days of old. Within a few days I accepted his invitation, and you can imagine my immense surprise, when, after a hearty hand-shake, he led me on to his lawn and pointed to a tall flagpole from which dallied the old battleflag consecrated to us by so many fond memories. He told me that his family had been soldiers for generations; that his father had been a captain in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
that with the setting sun Grant would have been crushed before Buell's reinforcements could have saved him. With a magnanimity unknown to smaller souls, General Robert E. Lee assumed the entire responsibility for the failure at Gettysburg, although he knew, and the records remain to prove it, that the fault was not his. Nothing t at the Academy, and took first honors in horsemanship, which secured him a commission in the famous 2nd Cavalry, of which Albert Sidney Johnston was colonel, Robert E. Lee, lieutenant-colonel, and Hardee and George H. Thomas, majors—nearly every one of the officers of that regiment became distinguished soldiers in the Confederatebeen advanced to the command of the corps. By this time his skill, activity and brilliant courage had won for him one of the first reputations in the army. General R. E. Lee, writing to him, said: Your admirable conduct, devotion to the cause of your country and devotion to duty; fill me with pleasure. The importance of Spotsy
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The surrender of Gen. R. E. Lee. (search)
The surrender of Gen. R. E. Lee. He did not offer his sword to General Grant. During my sojourn at the Yellow Sulphur Springs, Virginia, last summer, as resident physician, I interviewed a number of our Southern people, both young and old, as well as a few Northern and Western people, as to whether General Robert E.General Robert E. Lee offered to surrender his sword to General U. S. Grant on the 9th day of April, 1865, at Appomattox, Va., and have been surprised to find that nine out of ten, including some old Confederate veterans, positively state that Lee did offer his sword to Grant, and that the latter was magnanimous enough to refuse it. The following, officer accompanying General Lee on the occasion, has disclaimed that anything of the kind occurred. Dr. J. William Jones, in Personal Reminiscences of General Robert E. Lee, at page 303, reports General Lee as making a similar statement during a conversation with a company of friends, as follows: General Grant returned
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
in memory of her husband, Virginius Newton, of Richmond, Va. The Hermitage Press, Inc., 1907, Richmond, Va. As expressed in its preface: It is not the design of this book to open the subject of secession (but merely to discuss that subject from the standpoint of abstract right), in order to vindicate the character of the South for loyalty, and to wipe off the charges of treason and rebellion from the names and memories of Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, Albert Sydney Johnston, Robert E. Lee and all who fought and suffered in the great war of coercion. The recent Confederate Reunion at Richmond; Va., where gathered once again the survivors of the historic struggle of 1861-5, makes timely the republication of the work under review; and, as a valuable contribution to the history of this subject, this work should be included in all public libraries and generally read. It is true that it cannot be claimed for this work that it is a dispassionate summary of the arguments wh
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