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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 2 0 Browse Search
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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Stuart's ride around McClellan in June, 1862. (search)
acres were covered with them. They were all burned. The roar of the soaring flames was like the sound of a forest on fire. How they roared and crackled! The sky overhead, when night had descended, was bloody-looking in the glare. Meanwhile the main column had moved on, and I was riding after it, when I heard the voice of Stuart in the darkness exclaiming with strange agitation: Who is here? I am, I answered; and as he recognised my voice he exclaimed: Good! Where is Rooney Lee? I think he has moved on, General. Do you know it? came in the same agitated tone. No, but I believe it. Will you swear to it? I must know! He may take the wrong road, and the column will get separated! I will ascertain if he is in front. Well, do so; but take care-you will be captured! I told the General I would gallop on for ever till I found him, but I had not gone two hundred yards in the darkness when hoof-strokes in front were heard, and I ordered: Halt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Prison Pastimes. (search)
term applied to new arrivals, captured on recent battle-fields. Upon their entrance to the fort they were greeted with the cry of Fresh Fish by all the old residents, and immediately interviewed to learn the latest from the outside world, and if Lee had whipped 'em again. The Times is dated April 8th--the day before Lee surrendered the remnants of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox—and it is presumed that no later number of the Times was issued, but that the occupants of the diffe Fresh Fish by all the old residents, and immediately interviewed to learn the latest from the outside world, and if Lee had whipped 'em again. The Times is dated April 8th--the day before Lee surrendered the remnants of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox—and it is presumed that no later number of the Times was issued, but that the occupants of the different divisions were soon released and wended their way to their homes in Dixie land. William Miller Owen. Springfield Republic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Debating clubs. (search)
term applied to new arrivals, captured on recent battle-fields. Upon their entrance to the fort they were greeted with the cry of Fresh Fish by all the old residents, and immediately interviewed to learn the latest from the outside world, and if Lee had whipped 'em again. The Times is dated April 8th--the day before Lee surrendered the remnants of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox—and it is presumed that no later number of the Times was issued, but that the occupants of the diffef Fresh Fish by all the old residents, and immediately interviewed to learn the latest from the outside world, and if Lee had whipped 'em again. The Times is dated April 8th--the day before Lee surrendered the remnants of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox—and it is presumed that no later number of the Times was issued, but that the occupants of the different divisions were soon released and wended their way to their homes in Dixie land. William Miller Owen. Springfield Republi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
n's defeat at the Staunton river bridge in 1864. [from the Richmond times, September 27, 1891.] A battle which saved Lee's Army—Two hundred and fifty hastily organized Confederates whip Twenty—five hundred Federals—Valuable contributions. Wcapable of bearing arms. Colonel Flournoy went at once to the county town and sent out couriers with orders signed by General Lee, for all men and boys and Confederate soldiers on furlough to repair at once to the defence of this important point. th showed Wilson's trains and army retiring from the field in retreat upon Grant's lines, but he was intercepted by General Rooney Lee, who captured all of his wagon train and two thousand prisoners, Wilson, with his remaining force, barely escaping uipped, and was one of the ablest and most daring of the Federal commanders. His object in this movement was to cut off Lee's supplies and compel him to retreat. It was Wilson who next year led the last invasion up Alabama and broke up the eff<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Dahlgren raid. (search)
ic, have been to a multitude of grateful recipients. Company H (originally called Lee's Rangers) 9th Virginia Cavalry, in which he served gallantly, had as its first Captain, Wm. H. F. Lee, subsequently Major-General, and familiarly known as Rooney Lee. A brother of the editor, H. C. Brock, a member of the faculty of Hampden-Sidney College, who was severely wounded at Stony Creek, Dinwiddie County, in 1864, with many valued friends, served also in this noted Company.—Ed.] Commander, Come 30,000 unfortunate men, women and children who were forced to remain in the Confederate capital awaiting the issue of the greatest civil conflict ever known in the history of the Anglo-Saxon race. The battle of Gettysburg had been fought, and Lee had been forced back into Virginia with a depleted army and a discouraged heart; the Confederate forces had recently been overpowered in Tennessee and defeated by sheer weight of numbers and excellence of the equipment of the enemy in many other