hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for S. D. Lee or search for S. D. Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 77 results in 14 document sections:

1 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
of their line-of-battle strength. Cantey's division, For Cantey's strength, see General D. H. Maury's return April 22d, 1864. For Loring's strength, see General S. D. Lee's return May 10th, 1864. For French's detachment, see General French's report of effective when joined.--E. C. D. two brigades of infantry and two batteries5300 for duty, came from Mobile about the 7th of May and was stationed at Resaca. Loring's division, three infantry brigades and two batteries, from General S. I). Lee's command, with 5145 for duty and a detachment of 550 from French's division, reached Resaca May 10th, 11th, and 12th. Meantime a regiment of the Georgia State linhese figures are official except for Mercer's brigade and the two regiments of the Georgia State line. For the strength of Jackson's cavalry division, see General S. D. Lee's return May 10th, and the return of General Johnston's Army June 10th, 1864. For the strength of General French's division, see his return of effectives wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
ery, Lieut. W. G. Robson, Capt. Evan P. Howell. Cobb's Battalion, Maj. Robert Cobb: Ky. Battery, Lieut. R. B. Matthews; Tenn. Battery, Capt. J. W. Mebane, Lieut. J. W. Phillips; La. Battery, Lieut. W. C. D. Vaught, Capt. C. I. Slocomb, Lieut. J. A. Chalaron. Palmer's Battalion: Ala. Battery, Capt. C. L. Lurmsden; Ga. Battery, Capt. R. W. Anderson; Ga. Battery, Capt. M. W. Havis. Hood's (or Lee's) Corps, Lieut.-Gen. John B. Hood, Maj.-Gen. C. L. Stevenson, Maj.-Gen. B. F. Cheatham, Lieut.-Gen. S. D. Lee. Hindman's division, Maj.-Gen. T. C. Hindman, Brig.-Gen. John C. Brown, Maj.-Gen. Patton Anderson, Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson. Escort: B, 3d Ala. Cav., Capt. F. J. Billingslea. Deas's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Z. C. Deas, Col. J. G. Coltart, Brig.-Gen. G. D. Johnston, Col. J. G. Coltart, Lieut.-Col. H. T. Toulmin, Brig.-Gen. Z. C. Deas: 19th Ala., Col. S. K. McSpadden, Lieut.-Col. G. R. Kimbrough; 22d Ala., Col. B. R. Hart, Capt. Isaac M. Whitney, Col. H. T. Toulmin; 25th Ala., Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
t. We reached the bridge as it was burning, extinguished the fire, crossed over in the dusk of the evening under an increasing fire from hostile cavalry and infantry, but did not stop till Logan had reached the wooded ridge beyond, near Jonesboro‘. The command was soon put into position, and worked all night and during the next morning to intrench, and build the required bridges. Hood had sent Hardee by rail, with perhaps half of his command, to hold Jonesboro‘. My Confederate classmate, S. D. Lee, who had had the immediate assault at Ezra Church, here appeared again, commanding Cheatham's corps. At 3 P. M. on the 31st the Confederates came on with the usual vigor, but were met by Logan and Ransom, and thoroughly repulsed. Hood now abandoned Atlanta, and united with Hardee in the vicinity of Jonesboro‘, near Love-joy's Station. Thomas, joining my left flank, fought mainly the battle of September 1st. During the rest that followed, Blair and Logan went home Major-General John M<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
same direction with his main body. Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee was instructed to move out with hisied at a later hour by the corps of Stewart and Lee. On the 27th General G. W. Smith's division e being in the vicinity of Rough and Ready with Lee's corps on his right, near East Point. Informawith his troops to Jonesboro‘, whither Lieutenant-General Lee, with his corps, was ordered to follow river in their rear. In the event of success, Lee and his command were to be withdrawn that night's State troops, were to form line of battle on Lee's right, near East Point, and the whole force mom his position near Jonesboro‘, or directly on Lee's left. Such were the explicit instructions ecessitate the evacuation of the city — to send Lee's corps, at dark, back to or near Rough and Realowing day, September 1st, at 2 A. M., Lieutenant-General Lee, with his corps, marched from Jonesboructed to hasten forward to his support, and General Lee to follow promptly with his corps. When th<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Sooy Smith expedition (February, 1864). (search)
ll fresh in your memory, you did not censure me for waiting for Waring, but for allowing myself to be encumbered with fugitive negroes to such an extent that my command was measurably unfit for active movement or easy handling, and for turning back from West Point, instead of pressing on toward Meridian. Invitations had been industriously circulated, by printed circulars and otherwise, to the negroes to come into our lines, and to seek our protection wherever they could find it, and I considered ourselves pledged to receive and protect them. In a letter of July 9th, 1.875 [Sherman, Vol. I., Appendix, p. 453], General Smith says: To have attempted to penetrate farther into the enemy's country, with the cavalry of Polk's army coming up to reinforce Forrest, would have insured the destruction of my entire command, situated as it was. The Cavalry of Polk's Army refers to the command of General S. D. Lee which joined Forrest within a day or two after Smith began his retreat.--editors.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The capture of Fort Pillow (April 12th, 1864). (search)
ndiscriminate slaughter, sparing neither age nor sex, white or black, soldier or civilian. On June 17th, 1864 (in view of the Fort Pillow Massacre ), General C. C. Washburn, the Union commander of the District of West Tennessee, wrote to General S. D. Lee, then the Confederate commander of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, asking for information as to the intention of the Confederates concerning colored soldiers who might fall into their hands as prisoners of war. GGeneral Lee replied, June 28th, in part as follows: The version [of Fort Pillow] given by you and your Government is untrue, and not sustained by the facts to the extent that you indicate. The garrison was summoned in the usual manner, and its commanding officer assumed the responsibility of refusing to surrender after having been informed by General Forrest of his ability to take the fort, and of his fears as to what the result would be in case the demand was not complied with. The assaul
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
Dalton, via Sugar Valley Post-Office. Lieutenant-General Lee moved upon Resaca, with instructions tsed with victory, to send reinforcements to General Lee, in Virginia, or to march through the gaps , I believed, would defeat Grant, and allow General Lee, in command of our combined armies, to marcnfer apart with the corps commanders, Lieutenant-Generals Lee and Stewart and Major-General Cheathaessee. On the morning of the 30th of November, Lee was on the march up the Franklin pike, when theeth, eighteen miles from Spring Hill. Lieutenant-General Lee had crossed Duck River after dark the ch; Cheatham followed immediately, and Lieutenant-General Lee in rear. Within about three miles of e, prevented the formation and participation of Lee's entire corps on the extreme left. This, it m with equal assurance, assert that had Lieutenant-General Lee been in advance at Spring Hill the pred line of battle formed in front of Nashville. Lee's corps was placed in the center and across the[15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
tunately intercepted while on his way to join Sherman. The Confederate army in three corps (S. D. Lee's, A. P. Stewart's, and B. F. Cheatham's) began its northward march from Florence on the 19th stantly busy, while his third was held in reserve; thus one Confederate corps was disposed of. S. D. Lee's corps, next on Cheatham's left, after sending two brigades to the assistance of Stewart, on ition of the garrison troops, and did not fire a shot during the day. Indeed, both Cheatham's and Lee's corps were held, as in a vise, between Steedman and Wood. Lee's corps was unable to move or toLee's corps was unable to move or to fight. Steedman maintained the ground he occupied till the next morning, with no very heavy loss. When, about 9 o'clock, the sun began to burn away the fog, the sight from General Thomas's positwas moved from his right to his left; Stewart's was retired some two miles and became the center; Lee's also was withdrawn and became the right. The new line extended along the base of a range of hi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
gate, including artilery, of 43,260. General J. H. Wilson says the cavalry numbered 12,000. The Confederate Army. Army of Tennessee.--General John B. Hood. Lee's Corps (Hood's), Lieut.-Gen. S. D. Lee. Johnson's division, Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson. Deas's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Z. C. Deas: 19th Ala., Lieut.-Col. 1. KimbrLieut.-Gen. S. D. Lee. Johnson's division, Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson. Deas's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Z. C. Deas: 19th Ala., Lieut.-Col. 1. Kimbrough; 22d Ala., Capt. H. W. Henry; 25th Ala., Capt. N. B. Rouse; 39th Ala., Lieut.-Col. W. C. Clifton; 50th Ala., Col. J. G. Coltart. Manigault's Brigade, Lieut.-Col. W. L. Butler: 24th Ala., Capt. T. J. Kimball; 28th Ala., Capt. W. M. Nabors; 34th Ala., Lieut.-Col. J. C. Carter; 10th S. C., Lieut.-Col. C. Irvin Walker; 19th S. C.,403. On November 6th his strength was 44,729. By the arrival of Forrest's cavalry, on November 15th, the army aggregated 53,938. Exclusive of Palmer's brigade of Lee's corps, Mercer's brigade of Cheatham's corps, and Sears's and Cockrell's brigades of Stewart's corps, and Forrest's cavalry (not included in Hood's return), the pr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
resources of the entire district. After General Lee retired to the Upper Rappahannock in the laew miles from it. In this state of quietude General Lee shortly ordered General Wharton with his brtrength and designs and report the facts to General Lee. I had with me the 62d Virginia Infantry, romptly reported by wire from New Market to General Lee. I also made the most earnest appeals to hng Sigel's movements to cooperate with him. General Lee's reply was to the effect that he was sorel troops, except my little band, nearer than General Lee's army, it was manifestly important to attahan that of New Market. The necessities of General Lee were such, that on the day after the battle again reported the perils of the valley to General Lee. Over eleven thousand men were driving me ce to defeat one or both of these columns. General Lee replied, as he had done in May, that he coully the latter. On hearing of our defeat General Lee again sent Breckinridge to our aid. He brou[2 more...]
1 2