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the Confederate author opened a correspondence with the Federal authorities, demanding the charge and specification against these men.--The answer was that they were tried as spies. A copy of the record was then demanded, and appeared from it that they were tried not as last for recruiting in Kentucky. Resolved to , President Davis had a couple of Captains selected by lot, as we stated the other day. But, in the meantime, he thought the best to try the effects of negotiation, especially as there were various other points to state. The correspondence in another column between Vice-President Stephens and certain Yankee officials explains the whole matter, and we refer the curious reader to it. There is nothing meaner than the genuine Yankee, and Lincoln is one of these. Stated by the fall of Vicksburg, he will listen to no terms. Let Lee give Meade another sound drubbing, and he will be glad enough to negotiate. This is a repetition of the old game.--But it will not do.
Gen. Edward Johnson. The Yankees have found out a new method of punishing their enemies. It is that of calling them Yankees. They called Gen. Early so, and they also call Gen. Edward Johnson so. Their papers say that General Johnson was killed in the hands of Gettysburg, and that he was a Pennsylvanian by birth. They mean, of course, Gen. Edward Johnson, for there is no other General, we believe, of either name, is General Lee's army. We have not heard from any other source that Gen. Johnson was killed, nor do we believe the statement to be true. He was, however, Pennsylvanian, but a native of Chesterfield county in this State. He graduated at West Point, and served through the Florida war. He afterwards went to Mexico, and was in all of Scott's battles. At the commencement of the war he was appointed Colonel of a extra regiment, and distinguished himself, on the battle of Greenbrier. Left in command of the post on the Greenbrier, he the decisive victory of Alleg
Gen. Lee's Army. The only direct intelligence we have from Gen. Lee's army, is from a dispatch received at the office of the Enquire yesterday, which states that there was a severe infantry fight at Boonsboro', Md., on the 8th, which resulted in the repulse of the enemy after three hours severe fighting. No other particulars are given. A cavalry fight is also reported to have taken place near Hagerstown, on the same day. The same dispatch states that the forces of the enemy had been withGen. Lee's army, is from a dispatch received at the office of the Enquire yesterday, which states that there was a severe infantry fight at Boonsboro', Md., on the 8th, which resulted in the repulse of the enemy after three hours severe fighting. No other particulars are given. A cavalry fight is also reported to have taken place near Hagerstown, on the same day. The same dispatch states that the forces of the enemy had been withdrawn from Gettysburg twelve hours before our army retired. This would not indicate that we suffered so serious a reverse as is alleged by the Yankee journals. The Central train from Staunton — by which it was hoped some news would reach us — had not arrived up to the hour of going to press, in consequence of the breaking of an sale between Charlottesville and Gordonsvill
us. The officer in command informed Lieut. Davidson that he had orders from Admiral Lee, on board the United States flag ship Minnesota, lying below, and then in viar which he was stationed without his permission. By this officer I sent to Admiral Lee a note stating my objects and wishes, a copy of which is hereto annexed, marbject, and inform you of the result without delay. Very respectfully yours, S. P. Lee. A. R. Admiral. Com'g North Atlantic Blockading Squard'n.Hon Alex'r H. Stephr Torpedo, Off Newport News, Va., 12 o'clock M., July 6th, 1863. Acting Rear Admiral S. P. Lee. U. S. Flag-Ship Minnesota. Sir --Will Admiral Lee inform meAdmiral Lee inform me, if he can, how long it will probably be before an answer will be made to my note of the 4th instant? Will he please, also, forward the accompanying letter froween the United States forces and the insurgents. Very respectfully, yours, S. P. Lee, A. R. Admiral, Comd'g N. A. Block'g Sq'n. Hon. Alex'r H. Stephens. [E
is in these accounts no claim of having routed Lee, and all the artillery said to have been capturdetached parties.--There has been no pursuit of Lee sufficient to harass him. The first attempt at G. Dispatches about the Falling back of Gen. Lee and Consequent fighting A dispatch, datedomac, and our army is already in motion. Gen. Lee paroled yesterday about 2,000 Union prisonerss are entertained that but a small portion of Gen. Lee's army will escape. Hagerstown, via Fredorward us rapidly as they are organized. Gen. Lee is said to hold all the passes in South Mount pursuit. Three letters from Jeff Davis to Lee were found on a man, concealed in his boot. Davis, in one letter, tells Lee he had underrated she strength of the Army of the Potomac, and that iregard's army as he exported. Davis thinks Lee made a mistake going into Pennsylvania, and fears serious disaster if Lee does not immediately return. The tone of his letter was very disparagin[5 more...]
From Maryland.all quiet at Hagerstown. Martinsburg July 9. --Our army is at Hagerstown. All quiet there to-day. A cavalry skirmish took place yesterday. There is no information of the whereabouts of the Yankee army. Maryland Heights have been reoccupied by a small force of the enemy. An ordnance train has just passed on the way to Gen. Lee, who is waiting for it.