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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 27, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 2 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
Sectarianism has received another hearty blow at the hands of the delegates—particularly with reference to any new organization. Resolutions introduced on motion of Oliver Johnson, and adopted unanimously (Lib. 8: 77). Our New Ipswich friend, Mr. Lee, has not Samuel Lee. opened his lips, nor any one on his side of the house. So far, therefore, all's well. Monday evening.—I have just returned from a large meeting of the colored friends in Zion's Church, very many of whom were induced to Samuel Lee. opened his lips, nor any one on his side of the house. So far, therefore, all's well. Monday evening.—I have just returned from a large meeting of the colored friends in Zion's Church, very many of whom were induced to attend by knowing that I would be present. The meeting was addressed by Beriah Green, Alvan Stewart, Rev. Mr. Cross, Charles W. Denison, and myself. It was an John Cross. interesting occasion. The manner in which these dear colored friends throng around me is very affecting to my feelings. Their expressions of attachment and gratitude are of the strongest kind. O what a reward for the very little I have done on their behalf! Tuesday morning.— . . . Speaking of the manifest May 8, 183
of second, 342; aids Amistad captives, 326; calls G. the king of day, 342; buys Emancipator, 343, 344; at Philadelphia, 343; calls G. an adventurer, 379; incensed at Standard, 418; edits Ballot-Box, 418; opposes Borden's reelection, 437.—Letter from G. Smith, 2.319. Le Bosquet, John, Rev. [b. Haverhill, Mass., May 13, 1811], 2.271. Lee, Luther, Rev. [b. Schoharie, N. Y., Nov. 30, 1800], defence of Birney, 2.304, Third Party activity, 343, 437, at Chardon St. Convention, 425, 427. Lee, Samuel, 2.210. Leggett, Samuel, 1.192. Leggett, William [1802-1838], 1.493 Le Moyne, Francis Julius, Dr. [b. Washington, Pa., Sept. 4, 1798; d. there, Oct. 14, 1879], declines nomination for Vice-President, 2.319, 320. Lethem, Matthew, 2.398. Lewis, Alonzo [b. Lynn, Mass., Aug. 28, 1794; d. Jan. 21, 1861], poet and teacher, 1.273; part in founding New Eng. A. S. Soc., 278; helps edit Lib., 283.—Portrait in collected Poems, Boston, 1882. Lewis, Evan [b. Radnor, Pa., August 19, 1782; d
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
of Society (1877). The tariff controversies elicited but few works of importance. In the earlier period, in the contest centring around the Bill of Abominations of 1828 and its immediate successors, we have to note, in addition to the works of Lee and Gallatin referred to above, T. R. Dew's Lectures on the Restrictive system (1829) and Hezekiah Niles's Journal of the meeting of the friends of domestic industry (1831). Perhaps the most outstanding figure of this period was Condy Raguet, authpects the best poem produced in the colonies before the eighteenth century, dates from 1677. As early as 1693, at least, book dealers had begun to sell private libraries, for in that year appeared The Library of the late Reverend and learned Mr. Samuel Lee . . . Exposed . . . to sale, by Duncan Campbell, Boston. At Boston also was issued in 1717 A catalogue of curious and valuable books, belonging to the late Reverend & learned Mr. Ebenezer Pemberton . . . to be sold by auction, at the Brown
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
rper's magazine, 308 Lever, 308 Le Vieux Salomon, 593, 594 Lewars, Elsie Singmaster, 585 Lewes, 230 Lewis, Charles Bertrand, 21, 26 Lewis, Charlton Thomas, 461, 463 Lewis, M., 58 Lewis, M. G., 542 Lewis, Richard, 445 Lewis, S., 409 Lexicon (Pickering), 461 Leyh, Edward, 581 L'Hermite du Niagara, 593 Libbey, William, 159 Liberator, 333 Liberty and slavery, 339 Libin, Z., 600, 601, 604-5, 607 n., 609 Library of the late Reverend and Learned Mr. Samuel Lee, the, 533 Liddell, 461 Lidia, 595 Lieber, Francis, 342, 347, 348, 461, 581, 585, 586 Life (comic paper), 22 Life, adventures and travels in California, 138 Life among the Indians, 149 Life among the Modocs, 54 Life and adventures of James P. Beckwourth, the, 152 Life and growth of language, the, 469 Life and letters of Joel Barlow, 541 Life and times of John A. Sutter, 140 Life and times of Joseph E. Brown, 352 Life and writings of Jared Sparks, the, 178
ed individuals: C. W. C. Dunnington, Dr. Cornelius Boyle, Dr. Garnett, (son-in-law of Governor Wise) Edward A. Pollard, Major' C. S. Wallach, Lawyer Ratcliffe, Francis Hanno, Commodore Forrest, William Shields, Edward M. Clark, Martin L. Smith, Samuel Lee, and several others. Gen. Carrington, United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, is rapidly maturing legal proceedings against the property of all persons who have left their homes and joined the so-called Southern Confederacy. persons in rebel service, under the provisions of the Confiscation act. The whole square, five hundred and ninety, with the exception of lot No. 5, situated between Delaware avenue and Second street, west of H and I streets, both belonging to General Lee. General Carrington (the well-known Capt. Carrington, formerly of this city,) enjoys very much his official privilege of despoiling the property of his former fellow-citizens. There is a sort of infernal satisfaction derived by the unfai
Fifty dollars reward. --For my servant Henry, who was sent from Clarksville, Va, to me, by way of Petersburg. He is about five feet in height, gingerbread complexion, and some 43 or 50 years of age. He has either gotten lost on the way or run off. The above reward will be given for his apprehension and delivery either to me or Mr. N M Lee. S G Tinsley. Pertersburg express copy one week and send bill to me. my 26--4t*