hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 209 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 147 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 85 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 82 6 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 81 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 28 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 10 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 16 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Stephen D. Lee or search for Stephen D. Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 110 results in 9 document sections:

Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
o its defense and security. I am ordered by the government of the Confederate States to demand the evacuation of Fort Sumter. My aides, Colonel Chestnut and Captain Lee, are authorized to make such demand of you. All proper facilities will be afforded for the removal of yourself and command, together with company arms and propeag which you have upheld so long and with so much fortitude, under the most trying circumstances, may be saluted by you on taking it down. Colonel Chestnut and Captain Lee will, for a reasonable time, await your answer. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Brigadier-General Commanding. Major AnLincoln had issued his proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteers to coerce the South; Virginia had withdrawn from the Union, and before the end of April had called Lee, J. E. Johnston and Jackson into her service; the seat of the Confederate government had been transferred from Montgomery, Ala., to Richmond; and early in May, Gene
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
to move out toward the river and attack and drive back the Federal line. The attack was made by Hood's Texas brigade and two commands of Hampton's brigade, with S. D. Lee's artillery. The troops engaged on the Federal side composed the division of Franklin. It was a spirited affair, the Hampton legion infantry, commanded by Lie Nineteenth Georgia, and mentioned particularly Lieutenant-Colonel Griffin, commanding his infantry battalion, Major Conner, in command of skirmishers, and Maj. Stephen D. Lee, commanding his artillery. In this affair the Confederates had five regiments and a battery actually engaged, and a brigade in support (but not engaged) on fire of Whiting, Pettigrew and Hampton rapidly increased, opening the attack on Couch, he rode into the woods where the troops were engaged, and learned from Col. S. D. Lee, of the artillery, that General Hampton had driven the enemy some distance through the woods, but that they were being rapidly reinforced [by Sumner], held a
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
governor and council of South Carolina, by the military and by the citizens. Governor Pickens addressed him the following letter a few days after his taking command: Dear General: I enclose the within to you, being a letter from myself to General Lee, dated May 23d, and one from him in reply, dated May 29th, containing an order to General Pemberton relating to the defense of Charleston. It strikes me that the defense of Charleston is now of the last importance to the Confederacy, and in mh Fort Lamar stood. In July, Col. Johnson Hagood was promoted to brigadier-general, and the First regiment came under the command of Col. Thomas Glover. Early in August, Generals Drayton and Evans were sent from South Carolina to reinforce General Lee, in Virginia. These generals took with them the First regiment, Colonel Glover; the Fifteenth, Col. W. D. De Saussure; the Seventeenth, Col. (Governor) J. H. Means; the Eighteenth, Col. J. M. Gadberry; the Twenty-second, Col. Joseph Abney; t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
Chapter 7: With Lee in Northern Virginia, 1862 the maneuvers on the Rappahannock Secoe Potomac. Anticipating this, on the 13th, General Lee ordered Longstreet, with twelve brigades anroken up the plans for the expected battle, and Lee put his two corps in position on the south banky collect all his army on the Rappahannock, General Lee wrote the President for the divisions of D.t Richmond would be endangered, telegraphed General Lee that until movements of the enemy were moreands before the capital. Finally, on the 24th, Lee wrote Mr. Davis that he had intercepted a letteent of Burnside, and revealing his plan to hold Lee in check until McClellan could come up from the Several affairs occurred during the five days Lee was detained on the right bank. In one of thes's front, was to follow Jackson. The genius of Lee, Jackson and Longstreet was to determine the prMajor Frobel's battalion, and Rhett's was in S. D. Lee's battalion. Pope massed against Jackson,[8 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
Chapter 18: South Carolinians with Longstreet and Lee Wauhatchie Missionary Ridge-Knoxville the Virginia campaign of 1864 from the Wilderness to the battle of the Crater. Following the battle of Chickamauga, Bragg's army occupied Lookout mountain and Missionary ridge, beleaguering Rosecrans, whose troops soon began to suffer for want of food. Longstreet, in command on the left, had the important duty of holding the river line of communication, and cutting off Rosecrans' supplies. Hood's division, at this time, was commanded by Brig.-Gen. Micah Jenkins, and Col. John Bratton commanded Jenkins' brigade, which joined Longstreet after Chickamauga. The First regiment was under command of Col. F. W. Kilpatrick; the Second Rifles, of Col. Thomas Thompson; the Fifth, of Col. A. Coward; the Sixth, of Col. M. W. Gary, and the Palmetto Sharpshooters, of Col. Joseph Walker. In October, 1863, Rosecrans was replaced by Thomas, Grant became commander-in-chief in the West,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 19: (search)
n ordered to march immediately with his own and Lee's corps, and to attack and drive across Flint reached Jonesboro about sunrise, and the last of Lee's corps did not arrive before 1 p. m. Howard haeady for battle. As the troops of Hardee and Lee arrived on the 31st, they were quickly put in lteenth corps, commanded by Gen. John A. Logan. Lee's corps occupied the right, the divisions of Pa Lee, hearing his fire, led his corps forward. Lee was repulsed, but Lowrey on the extreme left wason's division was conspicuous in the attack of Lee's corps. He was severely wounded and his diviso, while General Hood directed Hardee to return Lee's corps to Atlanta, saying: There are some indito-morrow. The execution of this order exposed Lee to what seemed almost certain capture, and leftnst the whole of the force of General Sherman. Lee left Hardee before day on September 1st. That , and again on the 3d, so that when Stewart and Lee came up from Atlanta on General Hardee's right [9 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
n, a work in which they most effectively assisted. Of this movement Col. R. E. Bowen writes: The regiment marched fully one mile under a continuous fire of shell, grape, canister and minie balls, without losing a single man-one of the most remarkable events of the war. Meanwhile Bratton's thin line repulsed assaults near the Libby house. In the afternoon Bratton took command of the whole line from his left to Chaffin's farm, and by the second day had recovered all that had been lost. General Lee's report of August 21st reads: The enemy abandoned last evening his position north of James river and returned to the south side. This morning General Hill attacked his position on the Weldon railroad, and drove him from his advanced lines to his main intrenchments, from which he was not dislodged. Over 300 prisoners, exclusive of wounded, were captured. Our loss was principally in Hagood's brigade, which mounted enemy's intrenchments. Supports failing, many were captured. G
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
nd that preparations should be made for evacuation as well as for defense. On January 19th, General Butler's cavalry division was ordered to South Carolina, and Gen. D. H. Hill was put in command at Augusta, Ga. The greatly depleted corps of S. D. Lee, Stewart and Cheatham, army of Tennessee, were on their way to reinforce General Hardee. These troops were reported destitute of clothing, but their indomitable spirit remained, and the people of the Carolinas were cheered by their approach. drawn, as I was completely flanked on both sides. The fighting at Rivers' bridge was quite sharp and lasted several hours. Wheeler, following McLaws' retreat, burned the bridges over the Little Salkehatchie. Gen. C. L. Stevenson, commanding S. D. Lee's corps, took position to hold the South Edisto to Binnaker's bridge. Sherman pushed his army rapidly toward Midway and Graham's Station on the South Carolina railroad, which was destroyed, while Blair threatened Branchville, and Kilpatrick,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
He took part in the constant engagements of General Lee's army on its retreat and was among the remant commander of it. He is now a member of Stephen D. Lee camp, of which he is second lieutenant comade his name immortal. After the surrender of Lee's army he returned to South Carolina and engaget testimonials from his old commanders, and Generals Lee and Beauregard, and his brigade, division aHart, the gallant officer who succeeded Gen. Stephen D. Lee in command of the Washington light artifirst lieutenant, and upon the promotion of Captain Lee to major, was advanced to captain. In Auguains, for which they received the thanks of General Lee. Anton William Jager, for many years a p twenty-seven hard-fought battles. He was with Lee at Appomattox, and then returning to his home, rst to hold that office. He is surgeon to Stephen D. Lee camp, of Anderson, and a member of the Surtinued on duty until after the surrender of General Lee's army, when he returned to his home in Cla[51 more...]