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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 209 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 147 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 85 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 82 6 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 81 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 28 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 10 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stephen D. Lee or search for Stephen D. Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of General Stephen D. Lee, [from the Richmond, Va., News-leader, June 14, 1934.] (search)
Address of General Stephen D. Lee, [from the Richmond, Va., News-leader, June 14, 1934.] Before the United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn., June 14th, 1904. The following is the address delivered by Lieutenant-General Stephen D. Lee, commander-in-chief United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn.: ItLieutenant-General Stephen D. Lee, commander-in-chief United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn.: It is impossible for me to respond to the kindly and cordial welcome so fitly spoken to my comrades who wore the gray without thinking of the great soldier and orator upon whom this duty would have fallen if he had not been taken from us. It was in historic Nashville, seven years ago, that his eloquent voice gave utterance to the gray. Tennessee gave 115,000. The Confederate soldier does not forget that from the bosom of this old Commonwealth came 115,000 men to follow the banners of Lee and Johnston, and that more than 31,000 were enlisted in the armies of the Union. Tennesseeans believe with their hearts' blood. They did not count the cost when
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's expedition from Vicksburg to Meridian, Feb. 3, to March 6, 1864 [from the New Orleans, la., Picayune, July 27, 1904.] (search)
eans, la., Picayune, July 27, 1904.] By Gen. Stephen D. Lee. In July, 1863, the Confederacy was ith, estimated by General Forrest at 7,000 men. Lee put his four cavalry brigades (Ross had joined nded avoiding a battle until the arrival of General Lee's force, which was rapidly approaching, andould outnumber his command when united with General Lee's, and he believed also that there would bebruary 20th), heard of the approach of General Stephen D. Lee's cavalry from the direction of Meridereached me constantly, and it was reported that Lee was about to reinforce him with a portion or thetreated. It was a great disappointment to Generals Lee and Forrest. Their united forces numbered that General Forrest lost 144 men, and General Stephen D. Lee 279 men, or only 423 men in all. These reports also show that Gen. Lee's cavalry was in the saddle actively engaged from February 1st to Mc or private, as worthy to be spared. General Stephen D. Lee, in his official report says: On th[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah. (search)
nfederate cruiser Shenandoah, carried the Confederate flag around the world, and never lowered it until seven months after Lee's surrender, when he brought his ship into a British port. From his address we take the following: Purchase of the scisco in April, and had on board papers of April 17th, in which was found the correspondence between General Grant and General Lee, and a statement of the surrender at Appomattox, but the same papers also contained President Davis's proclamation from Danville, declaring that Lee's surrender would only cause the prosecution of the war with renewed vigor. How harrowing must have been the news to these daring Confederates, then amid the floes of ice in the Polar ocean! But they were men of neeing in the Arctic ocean. I asked for American news. He said the war had gone against the South. That was in November. Lee's surrender was in April. The quiet satisfaction seen in all countenances, says Captain Waddell, for our success in rea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
turing over 700 prisoners and covering the earth in every direction with killed and wounded. Generals Lee and Anderson were present at this daring exploit, and expressed their admiration for the deatision. Just before entering this fight a shell exploded near a group of horsemen surrounding General Lee. He rode up to our regiment and asked how many rounds of cartridges have the men. He was ansce was flushed, and eyes sparkling with anxiety. We were ordered to march by the left flank, General Lee placing himself at our head and leading us in the direction of the heavy firing. Soon shot as were crashing and hissing and crashing around our ears. The men began to cry out: Go back, General Lee! General Lee to the rear! Colonel Charles Scott Venable, his chief of staff, grasped the bGeneral Lee to the rear! Colonel Charles Scott Venable, his chief of staff, grasped the bridle of his horse and besought him to retire beyond the reach of danger. Standing up in his stirrups, and looking back upon our serried ranks, he exclaimed: Mississippians, I go back under one cond