Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Tom Lee or search for Tom Lee in all documents.

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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
On getting into town I paid the Turnbulls and Tom Lee a visit. I found at the former place Master cing, followed by his columns of infantry. General Lee was present with this part of the army, and favor. We had driven them for some distance. Lee in his report acknowledges that two brigades of after the wounded. Smith is Chief Engineer on Lee's staff. He begs to be remembered to you and meived intelligence which induced him to believe Lee was about attempting a manoeuvre similar to thess-purposes. Hooker took it into his head that Lee was moving and made preparations accordingly. n, and to make my preparations accordingly. If Lee is going to assume the offensive, I presume he 's Ferry and advanced to Chambersburg. I think Lee has made a mistake in going into Maryland beforming up the valley to join Lee. When Hill joins Lee, he will have a large army, numerically much sum, and in my judgment should have done so. What Lee's object is in moving up the valley is not yet [15 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
not be hampered by any minute instructions from these headquarters. Your army is free to act as you may deem proper under the circumstances as they arise. You will, however, keep in view the important fact that the Army of the Potomac is the covering army of Washington, as well as the army of operation against the invading forces of the rebels. You will therefore manoeuvre and fight in such a manner as to cover the Capital and also Baltimore, as far as circumstances will admit. Should General Lee move upon either of these places, it is expected that you will either anticipate him or arrive with him, so as to give him battle. All forces within the sphere of your operations will be held subject to your orders. Harper's Ferry and its garrison are under your direct orders. You are authorized to remove from command and send from your army any officer or other person you may deem proper; and to appoint to command as you may deem expedient. In fine, General, you are intrusted
H. T., II, 324. Lee, Robert E., I, 196, 218, 273, 282, 286, 319, 340, 346, 361, 380, 383, 385-387; II, 4, 8, 11, 12, 20-24, 26-29, 37, 42, 45, 56, 59-61, 69, 90, 94, 95, 97, 99, 105, 109, 112, 117, 118, 122, 132-143, 148, 149, 151, 153-156, 159, 168, 190, 201, 203, 211, 213, 217, 221, 222, 227, 230, 231, 241, 249, 250, 255, 264, 265, 268-271, 273, 278, 309-311, 316-322, 325, 327-330, 337, 340, 342, 350, 352, 353, 355, 363-373, 379, 383, 397, 409, 411, 418, 422. Lee, S. D., II, 262. Lee, Tom, I, 233. Lee, W. H. F., II, 22. Leiper, Charles L., I, 384. Lennig, Thompson, I, 384. Leonard, Samuel H., II, 53. Lewis, I. W. P., I, 205. Light-house construction, I, 200-207. Lincoln, Abraham, I, 221, 236, 240, 242, 245, 250, 253, 263, 267, 270, 317, 319, 343, 344, 346, 352, 360, 362, 363-365, 372, 373, 379, 384, 385, 387; II, 134, 140, 142, 150, 154, 156, 158-160, 164, 166, 172-175, 186, 187, 206, 214-218, 223, 226, 227, 232, 238, 239, 242, 247, 248, 252, 257-260, 2