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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
guns that were taken by Colonel Cummings and those subsequently carried nearer to the Henry House, when the whole field was swept in the final Confederate charge. Another Fitz Lee. The Captain Lee referred to by Colonel Cummings was William Fitzhugh Lee, born in Richmond, but then of Alexandria, the son of Rev. William F. Lee, and he was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute in the class of 1853. Two years later he became a lieutenant in the United States army. When the war brokeRev. William F. Lee, and he was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute in the class of 1853. Two years later he became a lieutenant in the United States army. When the war broke out, he was on duty at the St. Louis arsenal, and he resigned to follow the fortunes of his State. He was soon appointed a captain in the Confederate army, and then lieutenant-colonel of the Thirty-third Virginia Infantry. The Second to the front. Just after that sally of the Thirty-third, the Second Virginia Infantry, under Colonel James W. Allen, which was the next regiment to its right, advanced to the assault. Colonel Allen, born in Shenandoah, had moved with his father's family
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
dress of, 57. Lampkin's Battery, Retreat of from Petersburg to Appomattox, 243 Last Confederate and Federal soldier, respectively, killed, 218. Lee's Rangers, A noted (company, 179, 277. Lee, General Fitzhugh 11, 12, 20,. Lee, general R. E., statement of as to Chancellorsville, 8, 9, 14, 55; Worsley's lines on, 63; Last order of to Army of Northern Virginia, 110; commanded in West Virginia, 121, 245, 292; Abiding spirit of, 350, 387; Tribute to by B. H. Hill, 356. Lee, Captain, Wm. Fitzhugh, 364. Lee, General W. H. F., Rooney, 179, 192. Lee, General W. R., 273. Lemmon, George, 170. Lincoln, Mrs. A. 37. Lincoln, Proclamation, War, 281; Emancipation, 311. Lipscomb, Captain, Martin Meredith, 187. Long, General A. L., 2, 15 Louisiana, Purchase of, 61. Lynch, Wilson B., 149. McClellan, General Geo B., Career of, 284. McNeil, John A., 280, 294. Manassas, First Battle of, Heroism of the Maryland Line at, 170; 33rd Va. Infantry at, 363. Mann, Sergeant S
who have crossed the Potomac to fight under the Southern banner. We deem it unnecessary to publish names; but we agree that every individual who swindles a soldier in these times deserves the execration of every good man. The late Captain Wm. Fitzhugh Lee. A correspondent, in a tribute to the memory of this gallant officer, who died on the 29th of July of a wound received in the battle of Manassas, says: He was the only surviving son of a formerly well-known and much-beloved citizen of Richmond — the late Rev. William F. Lee, Rector, successively, or St. John's and Christ Churches, and editor of the Southern Churchman. On the paternal side, he was the great grandson of R. H. Lee, of revolutionary fame, and on the maternal side of Colonel Levin Powell, a revolutionary officer and a member of the Continental Congress. A graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, he entered the United States Army, and remained in that service, discharging his duties with fidelit