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The Daily Dispatch: August 8, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
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Straggling The earnest addresses of President Davis and General Lee to the soldiers of the Confederacy, in the present period of importance in the summer campaign, are entitled to the serious consideration of not only the soldiers, but the people generally. That our cause is anything but desponding, every one who estimates the situation of the country must feel convinced. Yet to defend ourselves and repel the invasion with proper energy and effect, it is necessary that every soldier should be at his post. The feeling of fatigue and desire to spend a little while at home have no doubt induced some brave fellows to take advantage of some little scratch or ache to absent themselves, under the impression that they could be spared without detriment to the cause. it only needs enough men deluded by this argument to subject the army to a draft upon its force very disadvantageous, to say the least independent of good fellows who are thus misled, there are some who are arrant skulke
From Gen. Lee's army. The news from the army of Gen. Lee is unimportant. Very little information in reference to the movements of the enemy is known by those who have recently left our army. At Fredericksburg everything is reported quiet, with no indications of the presence of the enemy. From the Valley we have the statement that the Yankee force at Winchester numbers about eight thousand, and that they have other forces at different points in the Lower Valley. From Gen. Lee's army. The news from the army of Gen. Lee is unimportant. Very little information in reference to the movements of the enemy is known by those who have recently left our army. At Fredericksburg everything is reported quiet, with no indications of the presence of the enemy. From the Valley we have the statement that the Yankee force at Winchester numbers about eight thousand, and that they have other forces at different points in the Lower Valley.
nthony Konler, Co. G. 8th Alabama; Captain R Y Brown, Co. A, 18th Mississippi; First Lieutenant G W Jones, company I, 18th Virginia; Second Lieutenant J W Hack, 9th Virginia; Second Lieutenant J W Whitehead, company I, 53d Virginia; First Lieut S Crawford, Co. K, 6th N C, Second Lieut J T Martir, Co. L. 21st N C; First Lieut M F Jones, Co. D, 23d N C; First Lieut S J Evans, Co. B, 47th N C; Second Lieut J D Newson, Co. II, same regiment; First Lieut G M Whiting, Co. C, same regiment; Third Lieut Wyatt Lee, Co. C, 22d Ga; Second Lt G Songlesby, Co. G, 3d Ga; Second Lt C R Rice, Co. H, 8th Als; Second Lt W C Moody, Co. B, 2d Miss; Second Junior L Andrew London, Co. A. 16th Miss; and First Lt B F Wood, Co. H, 5th F a. The following named are at West's Building Hospital; Lt. Col. M. A. Parks, 52d North Carolina; Lt Col. M. J. Bulger, 47th Alabama, Adj't F. C. Powell, 47th North Carolina; Capt John W Johnson, 11th Georgia; 2d Lt. Beverly Barksdale, 23d Virginia; 1st Lt. James P. Gleen
Getting well. --Large numbers of convalescent soldiers are leaving the hospitals every day, and moving forward to join their commands under Gen. Lee. If the skulkers and desertage could be coaked or driven to their camps the Army of Northern Virginia would be numerically stronger at this time than at any period during the war. Those who fall to avail themselves of the amnesty offered by the President should be captured and shot.