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Large business. --General Dix has ordered the vice police of Baltimore to stop the sale of Confederate flags, badges and envelopes, and also the likenesses of President Davis, Generals Beauregard, Lee, Johnston, and all persons citizens of the Confederate States. Persons wearing red and white neck-ties have been compelled to take them off, under the threat that if they refused they would be taken to the station-house. One gentleman had exposed in the show-case of his store a pair of infant's socks, knit of red and white yarn. He was compelled to remove them, the vice policemen asserting that the colors were those of the Confederates. The Exchange says: All day Thursday the police were busily doing this dirty work. Some of them felt that they were engaged in a low business, and in some few instances apologized for their conduct, remarking that want of bread alone compelled them to be the tools of their superiors. The little boys on the street, who have been earning a
on Star of Wednesday evening last: This morning the Government received a telegram from General Rosencranz, embracing information that he was then, with a considerable portion of his command, at a point half-way between Bulltown and Flatwoods, on his way to attack Wise and Floyd, or either of them who might be in the vicinity of Summerville or Gauley bridge. He started from Clarksburg (his headquarters) upon this expedition, leaving an ample force to protect the Cheat Mountain pass, in Lee's front. By this time he has doubtless joined General Cox, and the thus increased Union force is probably up with the enemy, if the latter has not executed another of Wise's favorite and famous "thorough-bred" movements (to the rear.) Yesterday afternoon, between 6 and 7 o'clock, Beauregard threw a considerable force within three-fourths of a mile of General McClellan's pickets in front of the Chain Bridge. The long roll was beaten, and every preparation was made to meet the enemy,