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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. Raymond Lee or search for E. Raymond Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenant-Colon An interesting episode took place in relation to Colonel E. Raymond Lee, of Boston, in connection with these transactions.t ominous morning the order for the lot selection came. Colonel Lee was one of the hostages. General Winder, a West Point classmate and personal friend of Colonel Lee, with a sad heart entered the prison and said to him: Colonel, everything is c to say, Colonel, that if these men hang so must you. Colonel Lee met the disappointment like a brave man, simply saying: ges, a few weeks later, were released and exchanged. As Colonel Lee was leaving Captain Warner—the humane and efficient commd kindly endeavors to promote their comfort—intrusted to Colonel Lee $80 in specie, to be transmitted to his (Captain Warner'. After the war the Captain, being in Boston, called on Colonel Lee, was received with great kindness and hospitality. He a<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenant-Colon An interesting episode took place in relation to Colonel E. Raymond Lee, of Boston, in connection with these transactions.t ominous morning the order for the lot selection came. Colonel Lee was one of the hostages. General Winder, a West Point classmate and personal friend of Colonel Lee, with a sad heart entered the prison and said to him: Colonel, everything is c to say, Colonel, that if these men hang so must you. Colonel Lee met the disappointment like a brave man, simply saying: ges, a few weeks later, were released and exchanged. As Colonel Lee was leaving Captain Warner—the humane and efficient commd kindly endeavors to promote their comfort—intrusted to Colonel Lee $80 in specie, to be transmitted to his (Captain Warner'. After the war the Captain, being in Boston, called on Colonel Lee, was received with great kindness and hospitality. He a<