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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 718 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 564 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 458 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 458 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 376 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 306 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 280 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 279 23 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 237 5 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 216 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Fitz Lee or search for Fitz Lee in all documents.

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e exempted from arrest. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. headquarters armies of the United States City point, Va., Aug. 26-2:30 P. M.-1864. Major-General Sheridan, Halltown, Va.: Telegraphed you that I had good reason for believing that Fitz Lee had been ordered back here. I now think it likely that all troops will be ordered back from the valley except what they believe to be the minimum number to detain you. My reason for supl)osing this is based upon the fact that yielding up the We raising crops from a prolific soil to feed the country's enemies, and devoting to the Confederacy its best youth. I endorsed the programme in all its parts, for the stores of meat and grain that the valley provided, and the men it furnished for Lee's depleted regiments, were the strongest auxiliaries he possessed in the whole insurgent section. In war a territory like this is a factor of great importance, and whichever adversary controls it permanently reaps all the advantages of its prospe