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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 718 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 564 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 458 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 458 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 376 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 306 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 280 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 279 23 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 237 5 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 216 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fitz Lee or search for Fitz Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
ent to General Whiting an order saying that General Lee was pressed very hard by Grant, and needed ches. Early in March, 1865, we were ordered to Lee's extreme right at Hatcher's Run. Then commencn our front. This was but a feint to deceive Fitz Lee's dismounted cavalry on our left. At dark thoad to near Farmville. There an officer of General Lee met me and ordered us to move to him, then I moved up with the two brigades I saw that General Lee was suppressing a laugh. I knew he had a sbe accosted, when I exclaimed with an oath: General Lee, these men shall not move another inch unlesorganizing your army. Do you mean to say, General Lee, that I must take command of all men of all ranks? looking at General B. R. Johnson. Lee then understood my meaning, turned his head the oth of theirs who led them to battle and to death, Lee and all, were murderers! They were not traitors, and Lee and I and others whom they followed were not their murderers! The morale of their lives[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
gaged in some great flank movement, and they eagerly responded and pressed on at a rapid gait. Fitz Lee met us and told Jackson he could show him the whole of Hooker's army if he went with him to thes glasses the Federal command. He was so wrapped up in his plans, that on his return he passed Fitz Lee without saluting or even thanking him, and when he reached the column, he ordered one aide to gbattle fell strong upon him. When he arrived at the Plank Road he sent this, his last message, to Lee: The enemy has made a stand at Chancellorsville. I hope as soon as practicable to attack. I trust that an ever kind Providence will bless us with success. And as this message went to Lee, there was flashing along the wires, giving brief joy to the Federal Capital, Hooker's message: Tr the unsurpassed, the wonderful campaign of 1864, this is perhaps the finest illustration of General Lee's genius for war, and yet, in writing to Jackson he says: I have just received your note info
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
ny was reorganized for the war with largely increased numbers- W. N. Blow, Captain—at Currituck Courthouse, N. C., where it was then stationed. At the evacuation of Norfolk this company brought up the rear of General Huger's command, and was the last company to march out of Norfolk, as it had been the first to march in. At the organization of the Confederate States Cavalry under Major-General Stuart, June, 1862, this company was assigned as Company M to the First Virginia Cavalry, Colonel Fitz Lee commanding, and was soon after transferred to the Fifth Regiment, Colonel Rosser commanding. After the battle of Malvern Hill this company was ordered to Petersburg, and there became Company H, Thirteenth Virginia Cavalry, as part of this newly organized regiment under Colonel Chambliss. The regiment was made up of two companies from Petersburg and two from each of the neighboring counties-Prince George, Sussex, Nansemond and Southampton. Under the head of Remarks, the history of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.31 (search)
uffer severely, but capture some prisoners. During the campaign in Maryland in 1862, the 9th Virginia Cavalry was attached to the brigade commanded by General Fitz Lee. After nine days spent among the fine hay and rich yellow cornfields of Montgomery and Frederick counties, the regiment crossed the Catoctin mountain at Ham Cavalry were captured and brought out. With this charge, pursuit by the enemy was checked, and two battleflags, about which some brave men fell into ranks, with Fitz Lee in the centre, served as a rallying point where our regiments were quickly reformed. We then withdrew leisurely in the direction of Sharpsburg, and were not furblundering guide, was led to a position very close to a line of Federal batteries. Here we slept unconscious of danger until nearly dawn. Before daylight, General Fitz Lee ascertained the situation of the command, and endeavored to extricate us as quietly as possible, going around himself arousing and cautioning many of the men