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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 718 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 564 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 458 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 458 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 376 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 306 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 280 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 279 23 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 237 5 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 216 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fitz Lee or search for Fitz Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 68 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
3 miles to Richmond, have an interview with General Lee, and receive instructions on his part in th so secretly that he had his interview with General Lee, and returned to his command before any of ans from even his staff. After the return of Lee from the first Maryland campaign, Jackson and hthe Shenandoah, and cross the mountains to join Lee. Captain Smith went to his general and said:day Jackson started on his famous march to join Lee in time for the battle of First Fredericksburg. too severe. I have reason to believe that General Lee thought that he was too severe both on Garnto obey himself orders from his superiors. General Lee once said of him: I have only to intimate tis chief through the raging storm. On reaching Lee's quarters, the general greeted him with, Why, d, the lines restored and the victory won. Fitz Lee S story. General Fitz Lee gives an exceedicross that road, and I'll meet them there. Fitz Lee said that he made no reply to his remarks, bu[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
ant of its kind as I have ever heard, said of Fitz Lee: As a soldier he can stand unbonnetted briefly the battles and operations under General Fitz Lee's direction, which fix his place in our m been thrown into jail on some trivial charge. Lee was courteous, and then, as always, the gentlemcan citizen, whom you have no right to hold. Lee immediately returned to his office, put his dembe ordered to make a friendly visit to Havana. Lee remonstrated; his common sense convincing him t there had been an initiative and referendum, Fitz Lee would have been chosen the commanding general their own men. Through the intercession of General Lee these captives were made an exception to thin the campaign of 1864 was vital, and it was Fitz Lee's Cavalry that held the ground against the addan's first success over Early in the Valley, Fitz Lee did all that was possible to stem the adverseay, in conclusion, that it was not because of Fitz Lee's fame as soldier, diplomat or eminent civill[28 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarkable record of the Haskells of South Carolina. (search)
d back to it the day after the wedding. That day one year later the husband was a widower, with only the news from his far-away baby girl to solace the solitude of his tent. After the war Colonel Haskell married Miss Alice Alexander, sister of General E. P. Alexander. She died after becoming the mother of ten children, six of whom are daughters. A very marked favorite in society and a gallant officer was John Cleves Haskell, lieutenant-colonel of light artillery when he surrendered with Lee. He married Miss Stella Hampton, who died two decades ago, leaving one daughter and three sons, all now grown up. About seven years ago Colonel Haskell married Miss Lucy Hampton, daughter of Colonel Frank Hampton, who was killed at Brandy Station. They now live in Columbia. Very much alive is the sixth brother, Joseph Cleves Haskell, now a resident of busy Atlanta and popular in his new home. When he gave up his sword at Appomattox he was captain and adjutant-general of the First Arti
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
hrough the Aletuian Islands, going north towards Captain Navarin. June 23, captured whalers William Thompson and Susan Abigail, which left San Francisco in April, and brought papers of April 17, giving correspondence between Generals Grant and Lee and a statement of the surrender of the latter to the former at Appomattox, but they also contained President Davis' proclamation from Danville, Va., stating that the surrender would only cause the prosecution of the war with renewed vigor. We feom the vessels destroyed for their support. Eleven of the enumerated vessels were captured on June 28. These were our last prizes. Some of the prisoners expressed their opinion, on the strength of the papers brought by the Susan Abigail, of General Lee's surrender, that war might be and probably was over, but as an evidence that such was not believed to be the case, eight men from these vessels enlisted on the Shenandoah. On June 29, at 1 A. M., passed the Behring Straits into the Arctic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
then he was placed in command of a battalion of Kentucky troops and South Carolina troops, and did service in Virginia, participating in several engagements, and doing considerable scouting until the surrender at Appomattox. A few months before the surrender many of the soldiers of Chenault's Regiment and hundreds of the men belonging to Morgan's Cavalry, were exchanged with the sick, and those fit for duty were assigned to Lieutenant-Colonel McCreary's command. After the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox, Lieutenant-Colonel McCreary went with what was left of Chenault's Regiment to Kentucky, and reported to General Hobson, at Lexington, and were ordered to disband, and Colonel Mc-Creary returned with his Madison County comrades to Richmond, Ky., terms of peace having been arranged by those in command of the contending armies. The regimental field and staff officers. The field and staff officers of the 11th Kentucky Cavalry during its career were as follows: Colone
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.65 (search)
ranted my request, but more I think from courtesy to me than from any other motive, for it struck me at the time how guarded he had become the moment we approached the boundary of official ground. However, the next day I introduced Colonel Miltenberger. He handed Governor Allen's letter to the Emperor, who, without opening it; laid it on a table near him. He received us standing and our conversation lasted only a few minutes. This was my last interview with the Emperor. The news of General Lee's surrender reached us almost immediately afterward, and the briefness of the interval would itself suffice to disprove the allegations contained in the first editorial of the Washington Post on A Lost Chapter of History (March 14, 1901), from which I quote the following extract: At all events Polignac, accompanied by Moncure, went to Paris—via Galveston, we think—and though their mission was barren of result, so far as concerned the Confederacy, it leaked out when Moncure returned tha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.68 (search)
d at Second Cold Harbor.) After a hard march we reached the ford (Boteler's, just below Shepherdstown) at daybreak and crossed the Potomac, and marched up the river opposite Shepherdstown, halted, and two men from each company detailed to fill our canteens. At that time General Jackson rode up and directed General McLaws to strike McClellan about Dunkards' Church and drive him back. Kershaw's Brigade rested near the church. Barksdale's next, Semmes' next, Cobb's Legion next, I think, and Fitz Lee's Cavalry next on the river. I think that was about the formation of the line about where we went in the battle. I will sayjust here that Captain R. L. Henley (afterward judge of James City County), as we were on the way to the field procured a musket, and, as was his custom, went in the fight with his old company, C. He was at that time commissary of the regiment. He was wounded three times before leaving the field. We went on at quick time until halted and ordered to unsling knapsacks
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.70 (search)
eneral Hampton called it. With the solidarity of that army gone, the life of the Southern Confederacy was flickering and low, and soon extinguished. Hatcher's Run, the 31st of March, 1865, found Pickett's Division on the march, detached from General Lee's Army, and co-operating with General Fitz Lee's Division of Cavalry. The brigade of William R. Terry, of Bedford—Buck Terry, as we called him—was composed of the 1st, 3rd, 7th, 11th and 24th Regiments of Virginia Infantry. Amongst its previGeneral Fitz Lee's Division of Cavalry. The brigade of William R. Terry, of Bedford—Buck Terry, as we called him—was composed of the 1st, 3rd, 7th, 11th and 24th Regiments of Virginia Infantry. Amongst its previous commanders were James L. Kemper, A. P. Hill and James Longstreet. That morning it was leading the division, and the 24th Infantry (Major Bentley commanding) was leading the brigade. It was a beautiful morning. Everybody was in fine spirits. The esprit du corps, so characteristic of Pickett's Division, marked it as a body of men of which any commander might be proud. Enemy in front, holding ford over Hatcher's Run, came from one of our scouts. The division was at once halted, and Gener
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
t Taylor, 166 Botetourt Battery at Vicksburg, 29; Ad-dress of Miss Mary Johnston 29; Roll of with casualties in. 50 Breckinridge Col. W. C. P., 263 Boyd, Lt. L. V., killed, 268 Brent, killed, Captain, 272 Brooke Captain John M., 239 Bruce, Captain D. H., 155 Bruner, Captain, Andrew Jackson, 283 Bullock. Captain James D. 238 Burgwyn, Col. H. K., killed, 120 Campbell, Historian, Charles, 7 Carter, Lieut. Robert R., 239 Chalmers, Gen. J. R., 217 Chancellorsville, Fitz Lee at, 142 Chenault, Col. David W 258, 276 Chenault, Capt., Joseph, killed, 279 Cheves, Langdon, 162 Christian, Hon., Geo. L., 125 Christian M D., Col. W. B., 62 Cold Harbor, Battle of, 191 Confederate Memorial Literary Society, 258 Confederate States Cotton bonds: Failure to sell in 1862, 201 Fictitious Value of in 1869, 203 Confederate States Naval Steamers 239 242 Confederate States Navy Surviving Officers of, 290 Confederates Buried at Vicksburg, 53 Conway D