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that of the capture of the colors of the Twelfth regiment, Georgia volunteers, during the battle of Sunday, May third, 1863, by Captain William N. Green, commanding the color company of the One Hundred and Second regiment N. Y. S. V., is worthy of commemoration, as evidence of the fighting qualities of the Nationals, and as an act of personal strength and bravery: After several days' severe fighting between the United States forces under General Hooker, and the confederate forces under General Lee, the morning of Sunday, May third, 1863, found the One Hundred and Second regiment, N. Y. S. V., forming a portion of the Twelfth army corps, lying in the trenches on the extreme left of the Federal forces. The battle commenced at five A. M., and the One Hundred and Second were for several hours subjected to a heavy fire from a battery of the rebels, situated on their right flank; at ten A. M., the enemy's infantry attacked the brigade of which the One Hundred and Second N. Y. S. V. wa
Anecdote of Stonewall Jackson. The night after the battle of Fredericksburgh a council of war was held by General Lee, to which all of his generals of division were invited. General Jackson slept throughout the proceedings, and upon being waked and asked for his opinion, curtly said: Drive 'em in the river; drive 'em in the river! --Mobile Advertiser.
Arm and out. by Park Benjamin. Arm and out, ye Pennsylvanians; Leave your homesteads, arm and out t Hear ye not the rebel foemen Coming with a mighty shout? In delay lose not a minute; This is not the time for doubt-- Beat your drums and load your muskets; Pennsylvanians, arm and out! Lee is bringing on his cohorts, Ninety thousand strong, about; Meet them, kill them, drive them backward Pennsylvanians, arm and out! Young men, bid adieu to sweethearts, Though they whimper, scold, and pout; Duty calls you now, not dalliance; Pennsylvanians, arm and out! Husbands, quit your wives and children, Social cares and thoughts devout, Pleasure, work, trade, occupation; Pennsylvanians, arm and out! Take your hands from mines and forges, Where free labor made them stout; March, resistless, to the battle; Pennsylvanians, arm and out! Arm and out! your country orders-- Put the rebel ranks to rout; Fight for love, and home, and Union-- Pennsylvanians, arm and out! New-York, June 16, 1868.
General Lee's Wooing. My Marylalnd! My Maryland! My Maryland! My Maryland! Among thy hills of blue I wander far, I wander wide, A lover born and true; I sound my horn upon the hills, I sound it in the vale, But echo only answers it-- An echo like a wail. My Maryland! My Maryland! I bring thee presents fine-- A dazzling sword with jewelled hilt, A flask of Bourbon wine; I bring thee sheets of ghostly white To dress thy bridal bed, With curtains of the purple eve And garlands gory red. My Maryland! My Maryland! Sweet land upon the shore, Bring out thy stalwart yeomanry! Make clean the threshing-floor; My ready wains lie stretching far Across the fertile plain, And I among the reapers stand To gather in the grain. My Maryland! My Maryland! I fondly wait to see Thy banner flaunting in the breeze Beneath the trysting tree; While all my gallant company Of gentlemen, with spurs, Come tramping, tramping o'er the hills, And tramping through the furze. My Maryland! My Maryla
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), A gallant deed and A chivalrous return. (search)
them out of the way of our advancing force, and in crossing a rapid and deep stream Lieutenant Henry, commanding the rebel force, was swept off his horse. As none of his men seemed to think or care any thing about saving him, his prisoner, Lieutenant Paine, leaped off his horse, seized the drowning man by the collar, swam ashore with him and saved his life, thus literally capturing his captor. He was sent to Richmond with the rest of the prisoners, and the facts being made known to General Fitz-Hugh Lee, he wrote a statement of them to General Winder, the Provost-Marshal of Richmond, who ordered the instant release of Lieutenant Paine, without even parole, promise, or condition, and, we presume, with the compliments of the Confederacy. He arrived in Washington on Saturday last. This act of generosity as well as justice must command our highest admiration. There is some hope for men who can behave in such a manner. But the strangest part of the story is yet to come. Lieutenant
t, Where death's relentless missiles sped; To Zollicoffer's band defeat, And shoot the vile arch-traitor dead? Call me a “Yankee!” --it was they Who brought Antietam's battle on, And forced the traitors, in a day, To cross again the rubicon! At Gettysburgh, 'twas “Yankees” too, That memorable triumph gained; And there the victor's trumpet blew, While o'er them shell in torrents rained! 'Twas “Yankees” there, who forced to flee, With over “thirty thousand” loss, Their best and ablest General, Lee, And back to Jeff's dominions cross! 'Twas “Yankees,” too, boldly attacked The Mississippi's strongholds well, Where two score thousand arms were stacked, When Vicksburgh and Port Hudson fell! 'Twas “Yankees” there — all “Yankees” brave! The rebels' great domain did sever, And planted, on its wreck to wave, Their flag, forever and forever! Call me a “Yankee!” --who but they Tore down the vile oppressor's rag! And hoisted there — auspicious day! O'er New-Orleans
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Border war, as seen and experienced by the inhabitants of Chambersburgh, Pa. (search)
r ye this day Have gained for your children a glorious to-morrow.” VI. But again the rumor is borne on the breeze, (We often before had rumors like these,) That Lee is moving, intent on invasion. But we heeded it not until it was clear That Jenkins had come unpleasantly near, And Lee himself would surely be here Before his headLee himself would surely be here Before his head had many more days on. Then away the “prominent citizens” hurried, Excited, frightened, flustered, flurried, In wagons, carriages, sulkies, carts, On horseback, “on foot,” by all manner of arts And devices; And all kinds of people — Smith, Jones, Roberts, Robinson, Brown, and Bones, And the Rices. While away in advance of the headr a load that would break down a mason; Five muskets--two sabres — astonished I looked For howitzer, cannon, and caisson. VII. But Jenkins now returns again, And Lee and his army following them, Grief, terror, and desolation Throughout our lovely valley fling, And nearer, nearer, nearer bring Destruction to the nation. Th
ever present in mind, and I hope I am still remembered by my dearest love. After a difficult and very perilous route I arrived at this place about eight o'clock last night, and found the rebels in full command of the city. They have been skirmishing about the neighborhood this morning. They destroyed some of the railroad track at Hanover on Saturday, captured a good many horses, but they were returned, the men not being authorized by the officers to do it. I had to give my horse, General Lee, to a man to pilot us. I hated to part with him; but I will soon get another one, a better one than I have now. George and I have temporarily joined the Seventeenth Virginia cavalry; that is, until we can get with the Maryland companies, which are not very many miles distant. . . It is very likely we will be in a battle before to-morrow morning at Harrisburgh, if it is not surrendered. York, Pa., June 29, 1863. --After a long and roundabout wild goose chase, we arrived here about e
General Lee on invasion. A correspondent writing from Gettysburgh, June seventh, relates a talk between General Lee and a mill-owner of this State, during the recent invasion: General Lee's cGeneral Lee and a mill-owner of this State, during the recent invasion: General Lee's confiscation of paper at the mills near Mount Holly Springs has been mentioned. Mr. Givin, one of the sufferers, at whose house the General breakfasted, gives me some facts of interest. It is not thGeneral Lee's confiscation of paper at the mills near Mount Holly Springs has been mentioned. Mr. Givin, one of the sufferers, at whose house the General breakfasted, gives me some facts of interest. It is not that we love the Pennsylvanians, observed Lee, that we refuse to let our men engage in plundering private citizens. We could not otherwise keep up the morale of the army. A rigid discipline must be mLee, that we refuse to let our men engage in plundering private citizens. We could not otherwise keep up the morale of the army. A rigid discipline must be maintained, or the men would be worthless. In fact, adds Mr. G., I must say that they acted like gentlemen, and, their cause aside, I would rather have forty thousand rebels quartered on my premises at my house, and my new hotel is thrown open to the men to sleep in free of charge. I told General Lee, continued Mr. Givin, that the South must give it up; that the North would fight it out rathe
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), The rebel press on the Gettysburgh battle. (search)
The rebel press on the Gettysburgh battle. General Lee's magnificent victory at Gettysburg has, doubtless, cost us very dear, as many of us will know too well when the sad details come in. At present we have only the great and glorious result — the greatest army of the Yankee nation swept away, trampled under foot, and all but excites incredulity, although no man doubts that he reporter stabted accurately the prevalent belief in Martinsburgh at the time. We feel as well assured that General Lee, if he has met the enemy in a pitched battle, has inflicted a terrible blow upon them, as we do that we are living, breathing, sentient beings. Whether the details be precisely such as the telegraph gives us is. another matter. If General Lee has, after a hard-fought battle, taken forty thousand prisoners, he has gained one of the most complete victories on record. He has utterly destroyed the only obstacle that stood between him and Baltimore, and we can see no reason why he should no
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