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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers at Gettysburg. (search)
rease, 1,000, leaving the effective force under Lee in Pennsylvania and Maryland the 1st of July ate Potomac; and he thinks to about 3,500. General Fitz. Lee thinks they were under 4,000 strong at tnquiry at the Adjutant-General's office, General Fitz. Lee will see that in the seven corps of the — it was assumed by and is to be placed on General Lee. That is what I have always thought, and the statement of Colonel Taylor that General Lee witnessed the flight of the Federals through Gettyshe applied for and obtained permission from General Lee to attack while Rodes was engaged; and of Gordering a general advance, and it rests on General Lee, according to General Fitz. Lee's own admisGeneral Fitz. Lee's own admission. General Lee's fame can stand the ordeal of all the criticisms of all those who were not presGeneral Lee's fame can stand the ordeal of all the criticisms of all those who were not present, and can therefore form no just estimate of the obstacles to an advance on our part that presenor form any estimate of his strength, while General Lee had a much better view from Seminary ridge,[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of the Virginia division, A. N. V. (search)
Anglo-Saxon race. Great men never die, Their bones may sodden in the sun, Their heads be hung on castle gates and city walls, But still their spirits walk abroad. Again, gentlemen, permit me to thank you for your kind remembrance of the Army of Tennessee, and to again assure you that it is a pleasure to meet you to-night. Then followed a number of volunteer toasts, which were in turn happily responded to by Colonel James Lingan, President of the Louisiana Division, Army of Tennessee Association; Dr. Carrington, late of the Confederate States navy; Colonel F. R. Farrar ( Johnny Reb ), of Amelia; General Fitz. Lee; Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond; Major R. W. Hunter, of Winchester, formerly of the Staff of General Edward Johnson, and General John B. Gordon, and General J. A. Early, who always brings down the house. The whole occasion was indeed a joyous one, which renewed many glorious memories and revived hallowed associations which we would not willingly let die.