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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 54 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
, Lieutenant-Colonel James R. Herbert. Unattached. Fifth Alabama Battalion. Cavalry corps. on face of return appears to have consisted of Hampton's, Fitz. Lee's and W. H. F. Lee's divisions and Dearing's brigade. Major-General Wade Hampton, Commanding. Lee's division. reported as detached. Major-General FitMajor-General Fitzhugh Lee. Wickham's brigade. Brigadier-General W. C. Wickham. First Virginia, Colonel R. W. Carter. Second Virginia, Colonel T. T. Munford, Third Virginia, Colonel T. H. Owen. Fourth Virginia, Colonel W. H. Payne. Lomax's brigade. Brigadier General L. L. Lomax. Fifth Virginia, Colonel H. Clay Pate. Sixth Virginil R. H. Dulany. Eleventh Virginia, Colonel O. R. Funsten. Twelfth Virginia, Colonel A. W. Harman. Thirty-fifth Virginia Battalion, Lieut.-Colonel E. V. White. Lee's division. Major-General W. H. F. Lee. Barringer's brigade. Brigadier-General Rufus Barringer. First North Carolina, Colonel W. H. Cheek. Second N. C.,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary Notices. (search)
between the soldiers of these once fiercely opposing armies. There are very pleasant introductory letters from Colonel Augustus C. Hamlin, of Maine, and General Fitzhugh Lee, of Virginia. Not having yet found time to read the book carefully, as we propose doing, we are not yet prepared to say how far these gentlemen have beere famous. But it would take much stronger testimony than General Townsend has adduced to convince us of the authenticity of the interview he reports between General Lee and General Scott, and General Lee and General Thomas. Nor are we satified that E. M. Stanton was a saint. But we will recur to these and some other matters aBut it would take much stronger testimony than General Townsend has adduced to convince us of the authenticity of the interview he reports between General Lee and General Scott, and General Lee and General Thomas. Nor are we satified that E. M. Stanton was a saint. But we will recur to these and some other matters again. Zzz
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from General Lee to President Davis on the situation in September, 1863. (search)
ver to Kelly's. They were supported by a force of infantry. He skirmished with them all day and by 6 oa clock in the evening was pressed back to within half a mile of Cedar Mountain, with the loss, I regret to say, of three pieces of artillery. From this point he fell back after night to the Rapidan to prevent being turned, and to obtain supplies more readily. He was greatly outnumbered, the enemy having three divisions of cavalry with infantry, and he having three brigades, the fourth (Fitz. Lee's) being still at Fredericksburg. He reports that his men behaved with bravery and that he took a considerable number of prisoners. He left a picket force in front of the enemy at Cedar Mountain, and I have heard nothing from him this morning. It may be a reconnoissance in force merely, but I have made preparations in case it should be an advance of his whole force. I have been informed that the New York Herald of the 9th instant contained the movement of Longstreet's corps in the ord
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
nt, through their cavalry, and captured by us—the finest cavalry pistols, sabres, carbines, saddles, halters and bridles, blankets and canteens, oil-cloths and tent-flies—in short, all that we wanted, and our transportation were all branded U. S., together with the mules and harness. Our cavalry battery, caissons, battery forges, &c., all had the U. S. brand until Rosser's great disaster at Tom's Brook 9th October, 1864. Reconnoisance in force 19th August, 1864. Wickham's brigade of Fitz. Lee's division, Anderson's corps, was stationed to the right of Winchester, near Abram's creek. Its pickets extended along the line of the Opequon creek from the crossing of the Berryville pike north, towards Summit Point. In front of us was Merritt's division of the enemy's cavalry, each holding the opposite banks of the Opequon. About midday I received orders from General Wickham to move with the brigade and battery (Brethead's old battery of horse-artillery) down the Berryville pike and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. From march 28th to April 9th, 1865 (both inclusive). Richmond, Va., April 22, 1865. General R. E. Lee: General,—I comply with pleasure with the desire expressed by you to have a report of the last operations of the cavalry of your army, and have the honor to submit the following: On the 28th of March my division moved from its position on the extreme left of our lines in front of Richmond, on removal, and as we turned away, the wet eyes and sorrowing hearts silently told that one was no longer in our midst. Lieutenant Minnegerode combined the qualities of an aid-de-camp to a general-officer in a remarkable degree. His personal services to me will forever be prized and remembered, whilst his intelligence, amiability and brightness of disposition rendered him an object of endearment to all. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, (Signed) Fitzhugh Lee, Maj.-Gen. Com'g Cav
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Bragg and the Chickamauga Campaign—a reply to General Martin. (search)
orps were moved immediately in the direction of Lee and Gordon's Mills. In other words, the withdrmovement of Polk and Walker in the direction of Lee and Gordon's Mills. This is clearly the interpte, and then from Lafayette in the direction of Lee and Gordon's Mills. We may get a fair idea o the prompt marching of the Confederate army to Lee and Gordon's Mills would have engaged and perhaIf we look a short distance to the southeast of Lee and Gordon's Mills, we will find Rock Spring. ad crossed the river the day before, and was at Lee and Gordon's Mills. While this search for the by one of Wood's brigades from the direction of Lee and Gordon's Mills. By noon of this day (13th) cross the Chickamauga and attack Crittenden at Lee and Gordon's Mills. But General Bragg declinedtack Crittenden on the 12th, nor, when found at Lee and Gordon's Mills on the 13th, was he ordered orps were moved immediately in the direction of Lee and Gordon's Mills. The one corps of the enemy[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
Gordon's division. We were dismounted, and became engaged very quickly; but a few well-directed shots from our horse artillery cleared our immediate front—General Fitz. Lee taking command of the whole line, Wickham of the division, I had the brigade. Our battery was moved up to the edge of a piece of timber; to our front and rimy had formed, and Rickett's division of the Sixth corps, and Grover's division of the Nineteenth corps, were debouching to attack—this was about 12 o'clock. General Fitz. Lee turned his artillery's guns upon this body of the enemy. The handling of our six guns of horse artillery was simply magnificent Strange enough, the enemy's 3d: Its operations [the cavalry] up the Luray Valley, on which I calculated so much, was an entire failure. They were held at Millford by two small brigades of Fitz. Lee's division, and then fell back towards Front Royal, until after they learned of our success at Fisher's Hill. Had they been able to move the day before across t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Retreat up the Luray Valley. (search)
d Merritt went back through Front Royal, where he skirmished with Mosby during the afternoon. News was received of the victory at Fisher's Hill and directions to make up the Luray Valley. Both divisions at once moved forward and bivouacked at Millford creek, which the enemy had evacuated. note.—[Sheridan to Grant] September 23d: Its operations [the cavalry] up the Luray Valley, on which I calculated so much, was an entire failure. They were held at Millford by two small brigades of Fitz. Lee's division, and then fell back towards Front Royal, until after they learned of our success at Fisher's Hill. Had they been able to move the day before across the South Fork through Massanutten Gap, a powerful body of horse would have been in the rear of the enemy upon their line of retreat; but Early was fully alive to this danger and had guarded against it with Wickham's force. A powerful body of horse were held by two small brigades whom Sheridan has already said he could not get at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
el Taylor's laborious and exact statement as to Lee's numbers, and General McClellan's as to his owat Poolesville; Hampton's at Hyattstown, and Fitz. Lee's at New Market; cavalry headquarters were es 115,102 effectives. During the same period Lee controlled 80,835 men. Yet on June 25th, 1862, ttack from the Virginia side of the Potomac. Lee's 35,000 men were on that day preparing to marcis was the day when McClellan was feeling along Lee's front at Sharpsburg, and the day before the bvania. It is singular, but true, that whenever Lee anticipated his adversary's making a blunder heescue by McClellan was the only salvation. General Lee, with Longstreet and the reserve artillery,nstrations having kept McClellan in doubt as to Lee's intentions, and drawn Couch's division to resnia side. General Pendleton had been left by Lee with the reserve artillery to cover Boteler's F First Maryland campaign. It was undertaken by Lee with the certainty of thereby relieving Virgini[18 more...]