hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 20, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

Gen. Lee's army. Early yesterday morning a report obtained currency that the War Department was in possession of important and encouraging dispatches from the army of Gen. Lee, which would be given to the public during the day. These reports were retailed by sensation mongers through the streets until the public appetite was whetted to an extent that led it to expect the announcement of a triumph little short of the total annihilation of Meade's grand Army of the Potomac. When the dispatcGen. Lee, which would be given to the public during the day. These reports were retailed by sensation mongers through the streets until the public appetite was whetted to an extent that led it to expect the announcement of a triumph little short of the total annihilation of Meade's grand Army of the Potomac. When the dispatch was made public it was found that it had reference to an unimportant cavalry fight which occurred at Shepherdstown, on the Potomac, on the 16th inst, an account of which was posted on the Dispatch bulletin early on Saturday. The Central train which arrived yesterday afternoon, brought down the body of Major-General Pender, who was wounded in the battles at Gettysburg, which was placed in the Capitol. At the time his wound was received it was not regarded as mortal, but when he reached St
Fight at Shepherdstown. repulse of the enemy. [Special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch] Army of Northern Virginia, July 18. --A fight occurred yesterday morning at Shepherdstown between a portion of our cavalry, under Fitzhugh Lee and Jenkins, and several thousand of the enemy's cavalry, with artillery. The fight began in the afternoon, and continued until dark, resulting in the defeat of the enemy, who retired towards Harper's Ferry, leaving their dead and wounded on the field. We took a number of prisoners. The Yankee cavalry advanced from Williamsport to-day within four miles of Martinsburg. Gen. Pettigrew, of North Carolina, died this morning at 6½ o'clock of his wounds received at Williamsport.
a suitable form the admiration in that country for the memory of "Stone wall" Jackson, have nearly completed their plans. A statue in marble, of heroic size, 7 feet in height, by Foley, is to be presented to the native State of Jackson, Virginia, to be placed in the Capitol at Richmond. The statue will rest on a pedestal of granite designed by the same artist, and on one side it is proposed to inscribe that this is a testimony of England's admiration for a truly noble character on the other side Gen. Lee's order of the day, informing the army of its sad loss. It is estimated that the statue, without the pedestal, will cost £500 more. In all, £1,500. The sum is to be raised by subscriptions. The committee which has this matter in hand consists at present of the following names: Sir James Fergusson, M P, Mr. A Beresford Hope, Sir Edward Kerrison, M. P.; Mr. Gregory, M. P. Sir Coutts Lindsay, Lord Campbell, Mr. Lindsay, M. P, Mr. G E Seymour, Mr. J Spence, and Mr. G Peacocke, M P.
From Gen. Lee's army. Winchester, July 18. --All quiet in the army. Nothing from the enemy Heavy skirmishing on 16th at Shepherdstown. Enemy attacked our cavalry with cavalry and artillery. After a severe fight the enemy was repulsed, leaving his dead and wounded on the field. We captured 17 prisoners and a number of horses. Our army is in splendid condition. Very few sick and no stragglers. Gen. Pettigrow is dead.
ck arms staggered from weakness. The crossing of the Potomac by Lee's army — Lee not Whipped yet — the feeling in Washington. The HerLee not Whipped yet — the feeling in Washington. The Herald's correspondent, who was captured by our cavalry near Hagerstown and released after Gen. Lee crossed the river, telegraphs from HagerstowGen. Lee crossed the river, telegraphs from Hagerstown, July 14th, to that paper as follows: After the fight was over I was taken, amid mud and darkness, to Williamsport. I found the rebel r with him. In conclusion, let me remark--Do not think that General Lee's army has been defeated, though this campaign has ended in the day in Washington. The joyous anticipations of bagging the whole of Lee's army were this afternoon dissipated by the official information th conscription brings it home to their own thresholds as much as if Gen. Lee's worse men were rattling down Broadway. If they would avoid conscenerally believed that most of Beauregard's troops were sent to join Lee before the battle of Gettysburg, and it is thought there were but fe<