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te in whatever fate awaits the outlaws of his command held here,--Richmond Examiner, March 8. Gen. Elzey's congratulations. headquarters Department of Richmond, March 8, 1864. General orders, no. 10. The Major-General commanding congratulates the troops upon their completely successful defence of the city of Richmond, and its rescue from the ravages of the invader. The enemy was gallantly repulsed on the north side by Colonel Stevens's command, and on the west by Brigadier-General G. W. C. Lee's troops. Their conduct is entitled to the highest praise and credit. To Colonel Bradley T. Johnston, and the officers and soldiers under his command, the thanks of the Major-General are especially due, for the prompt and vigorous manner in which they pursued the enemy from Beaver Dam to Richmond, and thence to the Pamunkey and down the peninsula, making repeated charges, capturing many prisoners and horses, and thwarting any attempt of the enemy to charge them. The Major-
y, one and a half miles. Upon the cavalry rejoining the brigade, we returned to Red Clay and rested for the night. February 23d. Marched with the division via Dr. Lee's house twelve miles, to near Catoosa Springs, Georgia, to make a junction with Fourteenth corps; arrived there about nine o'clock P. M. February 24th. Marched back east to Dr. Lee's house, with division. I was here directed to move south-east toward Dalton, crossing the ridge three miles north of the place known as Tunnel Hill, with my infantry and one section of artillery, the latter under command of Lieutenant Stansbury. I passed the first and second ridges to a road running south no doubt, would have fallen an easy prey to our arms. At night, the object of the reconnoissance being ended, we were ordered, and, with the division, retired to Dr. Lee's farm, on the west of the Tunnel Hill range of ridges, and three miles north of that place. February 26th. At about nine o'clock A. M., I moved my command so