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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. (search)
Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. Report of its Operations, April 3-6, 1865, when it was captured with Lee's Division at Sailor's Creek. This, printed from the original manuscript, was recently supplied by General G. W. Custis Lee, late President Washington and Lee University: Savannah, March 3, 1866. Major-General G. WGeneral G. W. Custis Lee, late President Washington and Lee University: Savannah, March 3, 1866. Major-General G. W. C. Lee, Commanding Lee's Division, Well's Corps, Army, Northern Virginia. General: In compliance with your request that I would communicate in an official form such information as I may possess of the operations of Crutchfield's Brigade, from the evacuation of the lines on the north of the James river to the capture of theMajor-General G. W. C. Lee, Commanding Lee's Division, Well's Corps, Army, Northern Virginia. General: In compliance with your request that I would communicate in an official form such information as I may possess of the operations of Crutchfield's Brigade, from the evacuation of the lines on the north of the James river to the capture of the Division at Sailors' Creek, on the 6th April, 1865, I have the honor to report as follows: The Brigade consisted of the 10th, 18th, 19th and 20th Virginia Battalions of artillery, the Chaffin's Bluff garrison composed of five unattached Virginia companies of artillery, temporarily organized as a battalion, and the 18th Georgia
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
Retreat from Richmond. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, May 2, 1897.] Colonel Crutchfield and the artillery Brigade. see ante, pp. 38-47. the report to General G. W. Custis Lee, of Major W. S. Basinger, on the operations of Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. interesting reminiscences. A forced March 'Mid Cold and rain. Fight at Sailor's Creek. Richmond, Va., April 27, 1897. To the Editor of the Dispatch. Being on a visit to Richmond from my home in St. Louis, I noticed ve made any omissions I would be glad to have them supplied. The adjutant-general of the brigade was Captain W. N. Worthington, of Richmond. Captain Worthington had been a schoolmate of mine at Hanover Academy just before the war. Major-General G. W. Custis Lee commanded the division and Lieutenant General Ewell the corps. We were thoroughly drilled in artillery practice, and manned the heavy guns on the line of the Richmond defences. We were also well drilled in infantry tactics, and we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
ee, my recollections. These reports make special mention of the conspicuous part borne by the Artillery Brigade at Sailor's creek. I quote as follows: Major-General G. W. C. Lee, commanding the divisions, composed of Barton's and of Crutchfield's Artillery Brigade, says: Before my troops got into position across the creekillery Brigade. He was killed after gallantly leading a successful charge against the enemy. Lieutenant-General Ewell, commanding the corps (Kershaw's and G. W. C. Lee's divisions), says that the Artillery Brigade of Lee's Division displayed a coolness and gallantry that earned the praise of the veterans who fought alongside of it, and even of the enemy. Our dashing cavalry leader, General Fitzhugh Lee, says: Though portions of the force, particularly the command of General G. W. C. Lee, fought with gallantry never surpassed, their defeat and surrender were inevitable. I will now quote from the report of the Federal commander, Major-General H. G