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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. W. T. Lee or search for J. W. T. Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. (search)
le; send nothing out. Having heard nothing of impending danger to Lee's army, or of the probability of the evacuation, I asked the reason We then knew all in regard to the evacuation of Petersburg, and that Lee and his generals, with that gallant remnant of our Army of Northern we could. Our first train was ready when the order came to hold it. Lee had not been heard from. The next we heard it was too late; he had ant superintendent came up and said: John, come here. I joined him. Lee has surrendered. I felt as though the ground had opened up under me well populated. The news of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee, and the flight of the Confederate Government had been carried to thd Danville; in fact, they had been coming daily since the retreat of Lee from Petersburg. With the dawn of day women and children, old and yween Danville and this point for several days after the surrender of Lee's army, bringing in the men as fast as they came there, wending thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
le; send nothing out. Having heard nothing of impending danger to Lee's army, or of the probability of the evacuation, I asked the reason We then knew all in regard to the evacuation of Petersburg, and that Lee and his generals, with that gallant remnant of our Army of Northern we could. Our first train was ready when the order came to hold it. Lee had not been heard from. The next we heard it was too late; he had ant superintendent came up and said: John, come here. I joined him. Lee has surrendered. I felt as though the ground had opened up under me well populated. The news of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee, and the flight of the Confederate Government had been carried to thd Danville; in fact, they had been coming daily since the retreat of Lee from Petersburg. With the dawn of day women and children, old and yween Danville and this point for several days after the surrender of Lee's army, bringing in the men as fast as they came there, wending thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
ns; Corporals, T. L. Johnson, F. L. Vellines, James E. Barker, Joseph H. Chappel; Privates, A. P. Adkins, J. D. Adkins, B. R. Birdsong, A. S. Birdsong, Henry Birdsong, Jr., J. 18 A. Bishop, J. L. Chappell, E. T. Chappell, R. A. Cocke, T. E. Dillard, R. L. Dobie, J. J. Dillard, W. H. Dillard, E. M. Ellis, A. H. Ellis, W. H. Gwaltney, B. F. Harrison, R. K. Harrison, T. J. Harrison, James H. Harrison, J. W. Harrison, B. L. Hargrave, L. D. Holt, James R. Jones, L. E. Jordan, William E. Lamb, J. W. T. Lee, Samuel Little, Jesse Little, William H. Marable, J. R. Moore, John R. Morris, J. R. Parham, Nathaniel Rains, Jr., B. F. Rains, George S. Rives, George E. Rives, W. B. Scott, J. L. White, R. W. White, John R. West, A. C. Winston, W. W. Woodson. These marched into Suffolk on twenty-four hours notice, and were there mustered into the State service, April 22, 1861. The following recruits joined the company before its reorganization for the war: Samuel J. Birdsong, P. H. Thorp, A. T. D