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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Mildred Lee or search for Mildred Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
This was willingly granted. The flag had to be surrendered, but a piece could be taken from it. With that sword which had saved his life at Malvern Hill he cut a section, including the lateral side and two stars. This he has sacredly preserved, with the same old saddle-bag and papers in which it was placed, to be transmitted as his most valuable heirloom to his children. Only one person has ever induced him to part with a portion of it. That one was the daughter of his old commander—Miss Mildred Lee. He gave her, some twelve years ago, a small piece, including one of the stars, and in return received a splendid portrait of her father. At Appomattox every respect was shown the Louisiana soldiers. At the surrender they marched with heads as erect as ever. When they impinged on the line of the conquering enemy the victors shouldered arms with grave faces, on which was neither smile nor cynicism, nor suggestion of the defeat of their adversaries. Colonel Waggaman returned to N