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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. E. Lee or search for R. E. Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ath, and was forbidden of God to die before it. But pitifulest of all is the sight of those former comrades of Jackson and Lee, who are willing to live and to be basely consoled with the lures of the oppressor, and who thus survive not only their colic, Chickahominy, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, were they not manifest overtures to us to have the God of Jackson and Lee for our God, and be saved? Here is the path; walk ye in it. And what said our people? Many honestly answered, Yea, Loal, and be destined to assert herself ever. Jackson, alas, lies low, under the little hillock in Lexington graveyard, and Lee frets out his great heartstrings at this world-wide vision of falsehood and vile decree, cruel as sordid, triumphant, unwhure progress. At 8 o'clock that night (March 1st) an escort from the two companies, and the committees, accompanied General Lee to the Artillery Hall, where he was again greeted with a large and enthusiastic audience, being gracefully introduced
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
r, because it must behold its country's death, and was forbidden of God to die before it. But pitifulest of all is the sight of those former comrades of Jackson and Lee, who are willing to live and to be basely consoled with the lures of the oppressor, and who thus survive not only their country, but their own manhood. Yes, besiderances at Manassas, Winchester, Port Republic, Chickahominy, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, were they not manifest overtures to us to have the God of Jackson and Lee for our God, and be saved? Here is the path; walk ye in it. And what said our people? Many honestly answered, Yea, Lord, we will, of whom the larger part walkeuth, which heroes worship, be indeed eternal, and be destined to assert herself ever. Jackson, alas, lies low, under the little hillock in Lexington graveyard, and Lee frets out his great heartstrings at this world-wide vision of falsehood and vile decree, cruel as sordid, triumphant, unwhipped of justice; while the men who ride p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
he Tremont Hotel, and made every provision for our comfort and pleasure. An elegant lunch at Mr. Duckworth's, a reception at the hotel, and a drive around the beautiful city and along the magnificent Gulf beach, filled up the afternoon most pleasantly and enabled us to appreciate why the people of Galveston are so enthusiastic about their city, and so hopeful of its future progress. At 8 o'clock that night (March 1st) an escort from the two companies, and the committees, accompanied General Lee to the Artillery Hall, where he was again greeted with a large and enthusiastic audience, being gracefully introduced by Captain Stafford, who received his lecture with warm appreciation, and generous applause. The hall was very tastefully decorated. After the lecture there followed an elegant banquet, at which, besides an abundance for the inner man, there was a pleasant feast of reason and flow of soul We bore away with us the next morning the most delightful recollections of Galv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
anced in mind and will, so nobly turned in moral worth, so just in heart, so clear in thought, and so authoritative in direction that in any land where the common sentiment can have spontaneous play, would, as inevitably as the sparks fly upward, and by a law scarce less fixed than that which moves the planets in their course, have been the leading man in whatever he undertook, and would have been called by one voice to become the Chief Magistrate of the people. True heroism—the heroism of Lee. As little things make up the sum of life, so they reveal the inward nature of men and furnish keys to history. It is in the office, the street, the field, the workshop, and by the fireside, that men show what stuff they are made of, not less than in those eventful actions which write themselves in lightnings across the skies and mark the rise and fall of nations. Nay, more—the highest attributes of human nature are not disclosed in action, but in self-restraint and repose. Self-restrai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
ceremonies were closed with a benediction by Dr. Pendleton. The mausoleum proper, which has but recently been finished, rests upon a crypt of heavy masonry, containing twenty-odd repositories for burial-cases. Into this crypt the remains of General and Mrs. Lee and their daughter, Miss Agnes Lee, were removed several weeks ago. The exterior of the superstructure, in accordance with the plan agreed upon, is severely plain, the material being ordinary building brick. The interior, or monumeMrs. Lee and their daughter, Miss Agnes Lee, were removed several weeks ago. The exterior of the superstructure, in accordance with the plan agreed upon, is severely plain, the material being ordinary building brick. The interior, or monumental chamber, is reached by a short flight of steps, and through an ante-room dividing it from the chapel. The floor measurement is 40x30 feet, and the entire finishing and architectural effect, as before described, is rich, appropriate, and impressive. The mausoleum can be cut off from the chapel by heavy iron doors, and the whole structure is absolutely fire-proof. It was gratifying to find Mr. Valentine so delighted with the manner in which his figure is placed—so entirely satisfied wit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The friendship between Lee and Scott. (search)
be seen from this letter that no sooner had Colonel Lee received and rejected this proposition, whie was a very affecting one. The veteran begged Lee to accept the offer of Mr. Lincoln, and not to e is going to whip him out of his boots. General Lee's voice and manner instantaneously changed, the city of Mexico, General Scott declares Captain Lee to have been as distinguished for felicitou as for science and daring, and says again: Captain Lee, so constantly distinguished, also bore impys that General Scott told him that he regarded Lee as the greatest living soldier in America, and the debt due to the invaluable services of Colonel Lee. I have the honor to be, With high reivered in Baltimore soon after the death of General Lee, Hon. Reverdy Johnson said that he had been, 1861, when he received the resignation of General Lee, and witnessed the pain it caused him. It w never failed to say that he was convinced that Lee had taken that step from an imperative sense of[10 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), President Davis on General Lee. (search)
President Davis on General Lee. We regret that we have space left for only the following brief extract from Mr. Davis's eulogy on General Lee at the great Lee Memorial meeting in Richmond, the 3rd of November, 1870: * * * * * Robert E. Lee was my associate and friend in the Mliitary Academy, and we were friends until the hour of his death. We were associates and friends when he was a soldier and I a congressman; and associates and friends when he led the armies of the Confederacy and IGeneral Lee at the great Lee Memorial meeting in Richmond, the 3rd of November, 1870: * * * * * Robert E. Lee was my associate and friend in the Mliitary Academy, and we were friends until the hour of his death. We were associates and friends when he was a soldier and I a congressman; and associates and friends when he led the armies of the Confederacy and I presided in its cabinet. We passed through many sad scenes together, but I cannot remember that there was ever aught but perfect harmony between us. If ever there was difference of opinion it was dissipated by discussion, and harmony was the result. I repeat we never disagreed, and I may add that I never in my life saw in him the slightest tendency to self-seeking. It was not his to make a record; it was not his to shift blame to other shoulders; but it was his, with an eye fixed upon the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A narrative of Stuart's Raid in the rear of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
to it. At Cedar Lane, adjoining this place, the writer was, shortly after the foray, captured and carried to Fort Delaware, where he was confined until the first cartel for the exchange of prisoners, which took place at Aiken's Landing, on James River, in. 1862. The writer cannot close this narrative without saying something in behalf of the heroic Martin and his gallant Mississipians, who gave Stuart their most cordial and unswerving support throughout the entire expedition. This raid gave General Lee the information he desired, for it disclosed McClellan's position on the Chickahominy, and the advantages derived from it enabled him to strike that terrific blow which resulted so disastrously to the Federal arms in the seven days fighting around Richmond, driving McClellan to Harrison's Landing, on the James, where he sought refuge under his gunboats, which raised the siege of Richmond and gave the people of that city temporary relief and much encouraged the Confederate forces.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Anecdotes of General R. E. Lee. (search)
osition on the top of Little Sewell Mountain. Floyd reported to General Lee, who was in command of that department, but many miles away, ther force was threatening the annihiliation of the Wise Legion. General Lee, divining at once the serious position of affairs, hurried with ore than half a mile off in an air-line on the opposite mountain. Lee, with his practiced eye, took in at once the superiority of Wise's p ordnance officer? &c. At last a soldier passing said, Yonder is General Lee, he can tell you. The green Lieutenant looked in the direction and where was the train? The next minute he wished he hadn't. General Lee quietly eyed his intruder a moment, and I can never forget thoseletter to his Captain, made him read it, and begged him to go to General Lee and get him a furlough. Captain W. said it would be useless, anile the tears streamed down his rough cheeks besought him to see General Lee for him. How could I stand there and see an old soldier weep! W
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
Notes and Queries. Did General Lee offer his sword only to Virginia, in the great war between the States? This is a somewhat popular idea which is intimated in the statements of Governor Anderson, in Colonel Bullitt's paper, in our last number. But the truth is, that while General Lee held his first allegiance as due to his native State, awaited calmly her action before deciding on his own course, and expressed his purpose, on leaving the United States army, of never drawing his swordon, to cast in her fortunes with the Southern Confederacy, he found an able, zealous and very influential coadjutor in General Lee. In his address at the great Lee Memorial meeting in Richmond, in November, 1870, President Davis said, among otherutterances: Here he now sleeps, in the land he loved so well, and that land is not Virginia only, for they do injustice to Lee who believe he fought only for Virginia. He was ready to go anywhere, on any service, for the good of his country, and hi
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