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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 135 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 132 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 100 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 92 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 87 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 72 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 59 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Lee or search for Robert Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
followed him to Richmond, where he joined with Lee in the campaign against McClellan in 1862; thatas said that at a council of war, called by General Lee after the Fredericksburg battle, Jackson weak Swamp road is but five miles distant. If General Lee had wanted Jackson he could have sent for him, but General Lee did not want him. He expected to defeat McCall, and isolate Franklin and Sumner him through which he could pass and rejoin General Lee. Pope, disappointed at not finding Jacksoner McClellan attacked 35,000 Confederates under Lee, making the contest a most unequal one. It wasrecently made, that General Jackson advised General Lee on the night of the 17th September to crossd sufficient force to do it. He agreed with General Lee entirely during the whole of this campaign and especially during this battle. General Lee writes, in a letter which I have recently read, Whe for the towering form beside him is that of Robert Lee. Thought and feeling and power of express[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
George W. Lowndes, Colonel Robert Ould, and J. A. Cowardin, of the Dispatch. Committee officers. The officers of the committee were: John Enders, President; William G. Paine, Vice-President; Isaac H. Walker, Secretary; and Surgeons, Drs. Cabell and Peachy. The living members. Of those now living may be mentioned: Messrs. R. S. Archer, John Enders, Andrew L. Ellett, Samuel J. Harrison, Jordan H. Martin, John H. Montague, Powhatan Weisiger, and Philip J. Wright. The propriety of recognizing the services of these gentlemen in some suitable way will, there is little doubt, be called to the attention of Lee Camp of Confederate Veterans at some early day. Always with the Corps. Although not members of the organization, there were several of our old citizens who had sons in the army, who went to nearly every battlefield with the corps, and rendered valuable assistance to the wounded, among whom was the veteran, Charles G. Thompson, who is still living at a ripe old age.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
us; the extinction of a great light in the temple of christianity. Thousands followed him to the grave and consecrated it with their tears. Then he spoke of Robert Lee, that grand old chieftain whose name is never mentioned to this day without throbbing heart by the old veterans of the South. General Lee was a frequent visitoGeneral Lee was a frequent visitor at our house in Richmond; he was then, as he is to-day, the great ideal of Southern chivalry and truth. Great in defeat as he was in victory, the annals of the world's history bears no purer or greater name than that of Robert Lee. Many reminiscences did Mr. Semmes recall of Mason and Slidell, Yancey and Breckenridge, and MalRobert Lee. Many reminiscences did Mr. Semmes recall of Mason and Slidell, Yancey and Breckenridge, and Mallory and Stephens, Beauregard and Johnston. He remembered as though it were only yesterday, every incident of that war, and spoke of the death of Albert Sidney Johnston, the brave and peerless, whose loss, as Mr. Davis said in his message to Congress, was irreparable; whose last breath cheered his comrades on to victory, whose l