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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ed and: returned without delay. I hope you will be able to arrange it so that the cars will not be detained. With this supply of corn, if it can be maintained, the condition of our animals should improve. Very respectfully and truly yours, R. E. Lee, General. [Copy.] headquarters, September 2, 1863. General: Your letter of the 31st is received. I have expressed to Generals Ewell and Hill your wishes, and am doing all that can be done to be well-prepared with my own command. Our greanz's army. I feel assured that this is practicable, and that greater advantages will be gained than by any operations from here. I remain, General, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) James Longstreet, Lieut.-General. General R. E. Lee, Commanding, etc. It will be noticed by those who have watched the desultory controversy maintained upon this subject, that after I had proved the fallacy of Gen-Pendleton's and General Early's idea of a sunri se attack, they fall back
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our Gettysburg series. (search)
distinguished author to publish. We sent some twenty-five copies of this letter to leading Confederates who participated in the battle and were in position to know its inside history, selecting representatives of every corps and division of our army, and of every arm of the service. The replies received we forwarded to the Count of Paris, and have published in our papers without note or comment of our own. Besides these we have published at different times the official reports of Generals R. E. Lee, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, J. E. B. Stuart, Rodes, R. H. Anderson, Brigadier-General J. B. Robertson, Colonel W. W. White, commanding Anderson's brigade, Brigadier-General H. L. Benning, Brigadier-Gereral J. B. Kershaw, Colonel E. P. Alexander, and Brigadier-General J. H. Lane. The reports of Generals Early, and Ewell had been previously published in the Southern Magazine, and the report of General W. N. Pendleton, Chief of Artillery, Army Nothern Virginia, which is crowded out of thi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appeal of the Lee Monument Association. (search)
Appeal of the Lee Monument Association. To the people of the Southern States: The State of Virginia has initiated the noble undertaking of erecting an equestrian statue of General Robert E. Lee on the Capitol grounds at Richmond, Va.; and has committed this trust, by statute, to the care and keeping of a Board of Managers. This Board, constituting the Lee Monument Association, is composed of her Governor, Auditor of Public Accounts, and Treasurer, whose names guarantee that this trust wil be well discharged. In deference to the fact that the glory of General Lee is the common heritage of our country, the Board has signified the desire that all the Southern States shall share in the tribute to him, and purpose that all so sharing shall, when the time comes, have an equal voice in awarding the contract. We, your Senators and Representatives in the Congress of the United States, being assured that you will not be slow to manifest, by an earnest and liberal support, yo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
ned in the several reports of the corps chiefs of artillery and battalion commanders, herewith submitted, than can be presented in a general statement. Regretting that no more could be achieved in the campaign, yet grateful for what has been accomplished, and for the still increasing strength with which we are enabled to wield this great arm of defence, I have the honor to be General, Respectfully, your obedient servant, W. N. Pendleton, Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery. General R. E. Lee, Commanding. Letter from General E. P. Alexander. Montgomery, Ala., February 23, 1878. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary: Dear sir: The letter of Colonel J. B. Walton, in the February No. of the Southern Historical Society Papers, compels me, very reluctantly, to intrude upon your readers with a brief personal explanation. It might not be necessary were your readers confined to those who have any personal knowledge of the subject, but I trust that even these will excuse me when
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
s refused to any save to those who might use them in prosecuting false claims against the Government; and, while this is not distinctly stated, it is strongly intimated that this has always been the rule of the Department. Now, we will do General Townsend the justice to believe that the reporter misrepresented him, or else that he is personally ignorant of what has occurred in reference to those archives. At all events, we hold ourselves prepared to prove before any fair tribunal that General R. E. Lee tried in vain to get access to his own battle reports and field returns; that General E. P. Alexander, Colonel Wm. Allan, Colonel Charles Marshall, and a number of Confederate gentlemen have been refused the privilege of seeing papers which they wished for purely historical purposes; that the Executive Department of the State of Virginia has been rudely refused to see or to have copied its own records, which were seized and carried off after the capture of Richmond; that Governor Vance
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's Second paper on Gettysburg. (search)
d character would give weight to his statements ought to do so. It is the only way in which we can hope that fragments of truth will reach posterity. Mrs. Longstreet will act as your amanuensis. I am very sorry that your arm improves so slowly. I trust that it will eventually be restored to you. You must present my kindest regards to Mrs. Longstreet. I hope your home in New Orleans will be happy, and that your life, which is dear to me, will be long and prosperous. Most truly yours, R. E. Lee. There is one point to which I call especial attention. The friends of Colonel J. B. Walton, Chief of Artillery of the First corps, think that in my first an inferential injustice was done to that gentleman. Colonel Walton was an officer of great worth, and at all times had the confidence of his commanding officers; and it is with pleasure that I correct what certainly was an unintentional derogation of his quality. It is true that in part of my first narrative there were sentences
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reply to General Longstreet's Second paper. (search)
ature, in the New Orleans Republican of the 27th of February, 1876, General Longstreet, referring to his letter to his uncle, said: His [Longstreet's] letter was published owing to its corroborative and sympathetic relations to one of General R. E. Lee written two weeks later. The publication was made following the publication of General R. E. Lee's, so that the facts might be known and noted in their proper connection, not in attack or defence of any one. The letter of General Lee hGeneral R. E. Lee's, so that the facts might be known and noted in their proper connection, not in attack or defence of any one. The letter of General Lee here referred to is the one to the President from which the foregoing extract is made, and the only part of it to which Longstreet's could bear the remotest corroborative and sympathetic relations is the passage given — that is, Longstreet's letter was corroborative of the opinion that a younger and abler leader for the army could have been obtained, and sympathetic with it in pointing out who that leader should have been — to wit: General James Longstreet. Accompanying the publication of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Shall we not have a number of earnest workers in this direction? Photographs or Engravings of leading Confederates are a very desirable part of our material. We wish to hand down to posterity the features of the men who made our glorious history, and we should be under special obligations to friends who can make additions to our collection. Mr. M. Miley, of Lexington, Va., has sent us a superb collection of his photographs, embracing the following: President Jefferson Davis, General R. E. Lee, Lieutenant-General Stonewall Jackson, Lieutenant-General J. A. Early, Major-General John C. Breckinridge, Major-General Fitz. Lee, Major-General G. W. C. Lee, Major-General W. H. F. Lee, and Brigadier-General W. N. Pendleton. For accuracy of likeness and beauty of execution these photographs are unsurpassed, and we would be very glad to see them in the homes of our people in place of the miserable daubs so frequently found. And we, of course, feel none the less kindly towards Mi