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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
. Y., Lieut. George P. Hart; H, 1st N. Y., Capt. Joseph Spratt (w), Lieut. Charles E. Mink; 7th N. Y., Capt. Peter C. Regan; 8th N. Y., Capt. Butler Fitch. Artillery loss: k, 7; w, 28; m. 2 = 37. Unattached: E, 1st U. S. Artillery, Lieut. Alanson M. Randol. Loss: k, 1; w, 3 = 4. The total Union loss (Revised Official Returns) was 790 killed, 3594 wounded, and 647 captured or missing = 5031. The Confederate Army. General Joseph E. Johnston (w); Major-General Gustavus W. Smith; General Robert E. Lee. right wing, Major-General James Longstreet. Longstreet's division, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson (temporarily). Kemper's Brigade, Col. James L. Kemper: 1st Va.; 7th Va.; 11th Va.; 17th Va., Col. M. D. Corse. Anderson's (R. H.) Brigade, Col. Micah Jenkins: 5th S. C., Col. J. R. R. Giles (k), Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton (w and c), Lieut.-Col. J. M. Steedman; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Maj. William Anderson; Va. Battery, Capt. Robert M. Stribling.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
mixed command of infantry, cavalry, and artillery.] Total loss of the Army of the Potomac: 1734 killed, 8062 wounded, and 6053 captured or missing == 15,849. The present for duty equipped, or effective force of this army (exclusive of Dix's command at and about Fort Monroe), on June 20th, 186(2, was 1511 engineers, 6513 cavalry, 6446 artillery, and 90,975 infantry, in all 105,445. See Official Records, XI., Pt. II., p. 238. The Confederate forces. Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee. Jackson's command, Maj.-Gen. T. J. Jackson. Cavalry: 2d Va., Col. Thomas T. Munford. Whiting's division, Brig.-Gen. William H. C. Whiting. Staff loss: I, 1; w, 1 == 2. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John B. Hood: 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; 1st Tex., Col. A. T; Rainey (w); 4th Tex., Col. John Marshall (k), Capt. W. P. Townsend; 5th Tex., Col. J. B. Robertson; Hampton (S. C.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. M. W. Gary. Brigade loss: kc, 92; w, 526; m, 5 == 623. Third Brigade, Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
In all the combats of the campaign from the Rappahannock to the Potomac, the casualties amounted (approximately) to 1747 killed, 8452 wounded, and 4263 captured or missing = 14,462. The Confederate forces. Army of Northern Virginia--General Robert E. Lee. right wing, or Longstreet's Corps, Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet. Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead: 9th Va.,-----; 14th Va.,-----; 38th Va.,-----; 53d Va.,-----;133; w, 593; n, 8 = 734. artillery: Washington (La.) Artillery, Col. John B. Walton: 1st Company, Capt. C. W. Squires; 2d Company, Capt. J. B. Richardson; 3d Company, Capt. M. B. Miller; 4th Company, Capt. B. F. Eshleman. Loss: k, 9; w, 23=32. Lee's Battalion, Col. Stephen D. Lee: Va. Battery, Capt. J. L. Eubank; Va. Battery (Grimes's), Lieut. Thomas J. Oakham; Va. Battery (Bedford Art'y), Capt. T. C. Jordan; Va., Battery, Capt. W. W. Parker; S. C. Battery (Rhett's) Lieut. William Elliott;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
Taliaferro commanding), Winder (Col. Baylor commanding), and Campbell (Major John Seddon commanding), with the batteries of Brocken-borough, Poague, Wooding, Carpenter, Caskie, and Raine. After the 26th, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson commanded Campbell's brigade. General Stuart, with the brigades of Fitz Lee and Robertson, cooperated with Jackson.--W. B. T. The march and the manoeuvres of Jackson had been a success; The results of Jackson's raid on Manassas Junction were reported by General R. E. Lee to be--eight pieces of artillery, with their horses and equipments, were taken. More than 300 prisoners, 175 horses, besides those belonging to the artillery, 200 new tents, and immense quantities of quartermaster's and commissary stores fell into our hands. . . . 50,000 pounds of bacon, 1000 barrels of corned beef, 2000 barrels of salt pork, and 2000 barrels of flour, besides other property of great value, were burned.--Editors. the army was reunited, and ready, under its great head,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
sualties during the entire campaign, from September 3d to 20th (exclusive of Miles's force at Harper's Ferry, for which see page 618), aggregated 2629 killed, 11,583 wounded, and 991 captured or missing == 15,203. The Confederate Army. General Robert E. Lee. Longstreet's command, Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet. Staff loss (in the campaign): w, 2. McLaws's division, Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. Staff loss (in the campaign): k, 1. Kershaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C.5; m, 65 = 290. artillery. Washington (La.) Artillery, Col. J. B. Walton: 1st Co., Capt. C. W. Squires; 2d Co., Capt. J. B. Richardson ; 3d Co., Capt. M. B. Miller; 4th Co., Capt. B. F. Eshleman. Loss (in campaign): k, 4; w, 28; m, 2, = 34. Lee's Battalion, Col. S. D. Lee: Va. Battery (Ashland Art'y), Capt. Pichegru Woolfolk, Jr.; Va. Battery (Bedford Art'y), Capt. T. C. Jordan; S. C. Battery (Brooks's Art'y), Lieut. William Elliott; Va. Battery, Capt. J. L. Eubank; La. Battery (Madison
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in Maryland. (search)
the Rockbridge Artillery, and as it galloped by, the youngest son of the general-in-chief, Robert E. Lee, Jr., a private at the guns, black with the grime and powder of a long day's fight, stopped a me artillery tore, but did not stay them. They pressed forward until Sharpsburg was uncovered and Lee's line of retreat was at their mercy. But then, just then, A. P. Hill, picturesque in his red bassas, Harper's Ferry, and elsewhere, had struck with the right hand of Mars. No wonder that both Lee and Jackson, when, in the delirium of their last moments on earth, they stood again to battle, sa one of the bloodiest of the war, and a defeat for both armies. The prestige of the day was with Lee, but when on the night of the 18th he recrossed into Virginia, although, as the Comte de Paris sath McClellan. And yet when it is known that General McClellan had 87,000 troops at hand, and General Lee fought the battle with less than 35,000, See notes on pp. 565 and 603 as to the strength o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
er make a movement on our extreme right to turn Lee's position. Burnside's manner in speaking of t on the flank, was all that covered the left of Lee's army. Could Hooker and Mansfield have attackClellan's theory of the enormous superiority of Lee's numbers, it looked as if the Confederate genein front of Sharpsburg, connecting the wings of Lee's army. General Fitz John Porter writes to srough all the day after Sedgwick's defeat, that Lee was overwhelmingly superior in force, and was p as only a strong diversion to prevent or delay Lee's President Lincoln in General McClellan's teence that Franklin's fresh troops should assail Lee's left simultaneously with ours, unless he regacome upon our left with a large force, and that Lee had proven strong enough without Jackson to repn have known the desperate condition of most of Lee's brigades he would have known that his own werumption of the attack, for the rooted belief in Lee's preponderance of numbers had been chronic in [16 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The invasion of Maryland. (search)
question arose as to whether or not we should go into Maryland. General Lee, on account of our short supplies, hesitated a little, but I rem, became engaged with some of the Federal artillery near there. General Lee proposed that I should organize a force, and surround the garris and get up supplies, and then we could do anything we pleased. General Lee made no reply to this, and I supposed the Harper's Ferry scheme A day or two after we had reached Frederick City, I went up to General Lee's tent and found the front walls closed. I inquired for the genss for me to offer any further opposition, and I only suggested that Lee should use his entire army in the move instead of sending off a large portion of it to Hagerstown as he intended to do. General Lee so far changed the wording of his order as to require me to halt at Boonsboromen at their encampments, to procure wood, etc. By command of General R. E. Lee. R. H. Chilton, Assistant Adjutant-General. Major-General D.