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s. morning, keeping up a brisk cannonade to the last moment, leaving all their heavy guns, eighty in number, with their ammunition. Also a large amount of material of war of every kind, which was abandoned, burnt, or sunk. Davis, Johnston and Lee were present, uniting in opinion that McClellan's disposition of his forces and artillery had made the place untenable. Magruder furiously and publicly urged fight. The fortifications were very extensive and formidable, and the force of the enr sick and wounded, numbering over two thousand five hundred, were sent to Richmond ten days ago. The rebel council of war was held in Mrs. Nelson's house, at Yorktown, on Tuesday and Wednesday last. Jeff. Davis and two members of his Cabinet, Gens. Lee, Magruder, and nine other generals were present. The debates were warm and exciting; but finally it was resolved to evacuate. The generals entrusted with the orders of evacuation kept it a profound secret from the officers and men. Anothe
ence referred to. It was held on the ninth, and the officers pressent were, Col. Anderson and Capt.----, of the army, selected by Gen. Huger, who was too unwell to attend himself; and of the navy, myself, Corn. Hollins, and Capts. Sterrett and Lee, Commander Richard L. Jones, and Lieuts. Ap Catesby Jones and J. Pembroke Jones. The opinion was unanimous that the Virginia was then employed to the best advantage, and that she should continue, for the present, to protect Norfolk, and thus aft a large force of the enemy had landed on Bay Shore, and were marching rapidly on Norfolk; that Sewell's Point battery was abandoned, and our troops were retreating. I then despatched the same officer to Norfolk, to confer with Gen. Huger and Capt. Lee. He found the navy-yard in flames, and that all its officers had left by railroad. On reaching Norfolk he found that Gen. Huger and all the other officers of the army had also left, that the enemy were within half a mile of the city, and that
red yards of our line, where they halted and remained at dusk. Gen. Mahone's brigade was soon reenforced by several brigades which were drawn up a short distance in its rear, while a large force was placed near by in reserve. President Davis, Gens. Lee, Smith, Longstreet, Stuart, and other commanding generals were upon the ground at this point, showing that it was an important position in the affairs of the day. Thus matters stood at sundown. As no further attack was anticipated during the noulder, the ball or fragment of shell passing over and burying itself in the muscles that cover the shoulder-blade. In falling from his horse, two ribs were fractured. He is, therefore, permanently disabled — at least for a month or so to come. Lee assumes command of the army. Generals Pettigrew and Hatton were killed. General Rhodes and another Brigadier, whose name I cannot recall, were wounded. The number of colonels, captains, and lieutenants killed and wounded, I will not pretend to
my several regiments and detached companies who had any opportunity to be in the engagement, my acknowledgments are especially due--Lieut.--Colonel Swinney, of the Thirty-second; Col. McLean, of the Seventy-fifth; Col. Smith, of the Fifty-third; Col. Lee, of the Fifty-fifth; Col. Cantwell, of the Eighty-second; Capt. De Beck, of the First Ohio artillery, and Capt. Blakeslee, of company A, Connecticut cavalry, commanding my guard. To the officers of my Staff also--Capt. Don Piatt, A. A.G.; Cap distant peaks of the Blue Ridge formed a background of indescribable beauty. General Schenck was assigned the right. His forces were disposed as follows: at his left was the Eighty-second Ohio, Col. Cantwell; next came the Fifty-fifth Ohio, Col. Lee; Seventy-third, Col. Smith; Seventy-fifth, Col. McLean, while the Thirty-second Ohio, Col. Ford, held the extreme right. The centre, under the command of the intrepid Milroy, had the Third Virginia, Lieut.-Col. Thompson commanding, on the left;
zeal and devotion to duty, particularly privates Carson, of the Jeff Davis Legion, and Pierson, of the Fourth Virginia cavalry. Herewith are submitted the reports of subordinate commanders, marked A, B, and C, and a map, D, showing my route, and papers, E, containing recommendations for promotion, and F, containing congratulatory orders published to the command upon its return. I have the honor to be, General, your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Cavalry. Gen. R. E. Lee, Commanding D. N. Virginia. General Lee's order. headquarters Dept. Of Northern Virginia, June 23, 1862. General orders no. 74. The General Commanding announces with great satisfaction to the army the brilliant exploit of Brig.-Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, with part of the troops under his command. This gallant officer, with portions of the First, Fourth, and Ninth Virginia cavalry, a part of the Jeff Davis Legion, with whom were the Boykin Rangers and a section of the Stuart ho
ons, I proceeded on the eleventh inst. on board the steam-tug C. P. Smith, Capt. H. C. Fuller. Got, at six P. M., the armaments of two rifled three-inch Parrot guns and one mountain-howitzer on board, and started at once for Fort Wool, to take Capt. Lee, Ninety-ninth New-York volunteers, and his command on board. As part of the men and stores were at Sewell's Point barracks, the tug was made fast for the night, it being not thought advisable to venture further in the darkness. On the twelfthacross Black River, where the enemy's scouts pass in and out of their lines. As daylight approached I returned on board, where the column arrived at five o'clock A. M. I can hardly speak in terms of sufficient commendation of the services of Capt. Lee, Ninety-ninth New-York volunteers, whose practical experience was of the greatest value in sounding and removing the obstacles. Also the men under his command, who were indefatigable, having worked hard from daylight till dark, and after that
n's divisions--then supposed to be Jackson's force--under command of Major-General Robert E. Lee, crossed the river at Mechanicsville bridge, Meadow bridge, and at A. It was now ascertained from prisoners that Stonewall Jackson had not joined Lee. Hence it was inferred that he was sweeping down the banks of the Pamunkey to seral along the whole line. Stonewall Jackson's column had formed a junction with Lee, and soon attacked our right with great vigor and pertinacity, but he met a gallhile the Forty-eighth Georgia and the Third North-Carolina remained in front. Gen. Lee then ordered the battery to be charged. The attempt was made. They all movedde had turned their backs on Richmond, and fronted destruction in the persons of Lee, Longstreet, Jackson and the Hills. These last were, therefore, advancing on Richmond with their backs to the city. Such was the position into which Gen. Lee had forced McClellan. The position which the latter here occupied, however, was one o
easure and task to announce to you the success achieved by this army to-day. The enemy was this morning driven from his strong position behind Beaver Creek Dam, pursued to that beyond Powhatan Creek, and finally, after a severe contest of five hours, entirely repulsed from the field. Night put an end to the contest. I grieve to state our loss in officers and men is great. We sleep on the field and shall renew the contest in the morning. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, R. E. Lee, General. Lieutenant-Colonel Robertson's report. headquarters Fifth Texas regiment, June 29, 1862. W. H. Sellers, A. A. General Texas Brigade: Major: I have the honor to report the part taken by my regiment, the Fifth Texas volunteers, in the action of the twenty-seventh June, 1862. I was ordered into the action to support that part of the line immediately in front of the house, which stands near the Telegraph road, and which was used as a hospital. My advance was much imp
he latter slightly, the others not mortally. R. E. Lee. headquarters army of Northern Virginia, Grr of our troops a nation's gratitude is due. R. E. Lee. headquarters Army North-Western Virginia, e, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. [Chantilly is north of Centrev Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. The following letter, receivedtch. Centreville, Va., Sept. 3, 1862. General Robert E. Lee, Commanding Confederate Army: Generes Hill, Ewell, and the Stonewall division--General Lee, without much opposition, reached Rappahanny letters in which I have spoken of my faith in Lee. He and his round-table of generals are worthy on the succeeding day, we know only through General Lee's two despatches to the President, which witry were almost deafening. At this juncture, Lee ordered to the support of Jackson the division y, and thus obtain a position in our rear. General Lee, with steady foresight, anticipated the mov[7 more...]
ong delay and embarrassment of the army under Gen. Lee, in its subsequent movements toward Washingtoarmy engaged us yesterday. I had a letter from Lee this morning. Ewell is killed; Jackson badly wtheir toil and valor. Jefferson Davis. General Lee's despatches. headquarters Manassas Juhe latter slightly, the others not mortally. R. E. Lee. headquarters army of Northern Virginia, Gre, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. [Chantilly is north of Centrevtch. Centreville, Va., Sept. 3, 1862. General Robert E. Lee, Commanding Confederate Army: Generes Hill, Ewell, and the Stonewall division--General Lee, without much opposition, reached Rappahannsoldiers, arid whose magnificent success places Lee at the side of the greatest captains, Hannibal,y letters in which I have spoken of my faith in Lee. He and his round-table of generals are worthy on the succeeding day, we know only through General Lee's two despatches to the President, which wi[3 more...]
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