Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Robert E. Lee or search for Robert E. Lee in all documents.

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ding lost his hat in the race. The last heard of him he was pursuing the enemy with part of his division — footmen after cavalry — with fine prospects of overtaking them somewhere in China, perhaps about the great wall. The Yankees were retreating toward the Devil hole. Early bound for the same place! They did very little damage in the valley. Here is the moral: The marshals under Napoleon's eye were invincible — with separate commands, blunderers. A general of division, with General Robert E. Lee to plan and put him in the right place, does well. Mosby would plan and execute a fight or strategic movement better than Longstreet at Suffolk or Knoxville, Tubal Early at Staunton. Jackson's blunt response to some parlor or bar-room strategist in Richmond, More men, but fewer orders, was wisdom in an axiom — true then, just as true now as when the hero of the valley uttered it. It is difficult to direct, especially by couriers, the movement of troops a hundred miles distant, amo
Doc. 27.-the efficiency of the blockade. Rear-Admiral Lee's report. flag-ship Minnesota, Newport news, Va., December 21, 1863. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: In reference to the excessive running of the blockade off Wilmington, as reported in the rebel journals, and copied in our own, I beg leave to call your attention to the following extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibralt
se of Representatives of the confederate States Congress, but which never was presented to that body. And, to complete this sketch of such efforts on my part to obtain legislative aid, in September last I memorialized the Legislature of Virginia, at that time convened in extra session in this city; but I regret to say that all of those applications failed to elicit any attention to the great importance of this invention to our country at this time. And finally, at the suggestion of Generals R. E. Lee and G. T. Beauregard, I referred the subject of my invention to the Engineer Bureau of the War Department, where it remained many weeks without investigation, and was withdrawn a few days since. And feeling a profound personal interest in the success of our cause and the future welfare of our country, I now appeal to the citizens and soldiers of the country at large for aid in raising the means to construct and put in operation the Artis avis, (bird of art.) By the use of a considerab
ng-sheet of snow on the spot where it fell, a few feet from the tent in which I write. A few yards from Captain Smith lies cold in death, in a pool of his own now frozen blood, the body of Lieutenant Colson, of Baltimore, and one of General Trimble's rebel staff, as will appear from the following pass found upon his person: Culpeper Court-house, July 27, 1863. Guards and pickets will pass Lieutenant Colson, Major-General Trimble's staff, in and out at pleasure. By order of General R. E. Lee. H. B. Bridg, Commanding, Major and Provost-Marshal, Army Northern Virginia. A photograph of a beautiful young lady was also found, on which was written in pencil--For brother Willie, from Florence. Further on, on the edge of the camp, lie three dead rebel soldiers, name and rank unknown. Three prisoners are also in our hands, two of them severely if not fatally wounded; of the latter, one is Lieutenant William Turner, of Baltimore. He says his uncle, Captain Turner, recent
e that the temporary reduction of rations has been caused by circumstances beyond the control of those charged with its support. Its welfare and comfort are the objects of his constant and earnest solicitude, and no effort has been spared to provide for its wants. It is hoped that the exertions now being made will render the necessity but of short duration; but the history of the army has shown that the country can require no sacrifice too great for its patriotic devotion. Soldiers! you tread, with no unequal steps, the road by which your fathers marched through suffering, privation, and blood to independence. Continue to emulate in the future, as you have in the past, their valor in arms, their patient endurance of hardships, their high resolve to be free — which no trial could shake, no bribe seduce, no danger appall — and be assured that the just God who crowned their efforts with success, will, in his own good time, send down his blessings upon yours. R. E. Lee, Genera
mbition, and ferocity of the slave. Abraham Lincoln is but the lineal descendant of Dunmore, and the impotent malice of each was foiled by the fidelity of those who, by the meanness of the conspirators, would only, if successful, have been seduced into idleness, filth, vice, beggary, and death. But we tire of these indignities and enormities. They are too sickening for recital. History will hereafter pillory those who committed and encouraged such crimes and immortal infamy. General Robert E. Lee, in a recent battle order, stated to his invincible legions, that seeks the cruel foe to reduce our fathers and mothers, our wives and children, to abject slavery. He does not paint too strongly the purposes of the enemy or the consequences of subjugation. What has been done in certain districts is but the prologue of the bloody drama that will be enacted. It is well that every man and woman should have some just conception of the horrors of conquest. The fate of Ireland at the p
ppahannock, and passed through Spottsylvavia Court-House about eleven o'clock on Sunday night. A despatch was also received yesterday afternoon from Colonel Mallory, commanding at Charlottesville, that a cavalry force of the enemy were threatening that point, and that our troops were fighting them about three miles from the town. Late last night, report stated that they had been repulsed, and had retired. The train which left this city yesterday morning, carried, as a passenger, General R. E. Lee, and for a while, those who feed upon rumors had it circulated that the train had been captured, and General Lee made prisoner. For this, however, there was no foundation, as information had been received of the safe arrival of the train at Gordonsville. Some uneasiness was felt in the early part of the evening, for the safety of the down passenger-train, due here at seven o'clock, but it was ascertained later in the night that it, too, was safe. Richmond, March 2, 1864. The raid