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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
his country. Such an opportunity would undoubtedly have occurred; but he has been translated to a better world, for which his purity and his piety have eminently fitted him. You do not require to be told how great his gain. It is the living for whom I sorrow. I beg you will offer to Mrs. Fairfax and your daughters my heart-felt sympathy, for I know the depth of their grief. That God may give you and them strength to bear this great affliction, is the earnest prayer of your early friend R. E. Lee. Life of Albert Sidney Johnston. By his son, Colonel Wm. Preston Johnston. D. Appleton & Co. This book is announced in our advertising columns as now ready, and we have had the privilege of reading some of the advanced sheets. Reserving a full review until we shall have an opportunity of reading the whole book, we will only say now that it is the story of the life of a noble man whose career shed lustre on the American name — that the narrative displays that delicacy of feelin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second battle of Manassas--a reply to General Longstreet. (search)
otice them. General Longstreet, in his Gettysburg article, in endeavoring to explain his official relations with General R. E. Lee, brings up the battle of second Manassas, and writes as follows: The next day the Federals advanced against Genort — in which he treats of distances, so necessary for an intelligent handling of artillery — we will now see what General R. E. Lee says in his official report: About 3 P. M. the enemy having massed his troops in front of General Jackson, advation occupied by Colonel S. D. Lee's four batteries of eighteen guns on the ridge to the left of Longstreet, and as General R. E. Lee says in advance of Longstreet's left; and these eighteen guns were so far to the left and in advance of Longstreet'e of the war. Its efficient service at Manassas is too generally conceded for even General Longstreet to assail it. General R. E. Lee concedes it; President Davis through its commander concedes it. Longstreet won sufficient glory at second Manass
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the Wilderness. (search)
aigns will forward them without delay to this office. The following reports of the battle of the Wilderness have never been in print, so far as we are aware: Report of General James Longstreet. headquarters First Army corps, March 23, 1865. Colonel — On the 11th of April, 1864, I received orders at Bristol from the Adjutant and Inspector-General to report with the original portion of the First corps (Kershaw's and Field's divisions and Alexander's battalion of artillery) to General R. E. Lee, commanding Army of Northern Virginia. On the 14th I reached Charlottesville, and awaited there the arrival of my troops, which were somewhat delayed by want of transportation on railroad. As the troops arrived they were encamped at points between Charlottesville and Gordonsville. On the 22d, in obedience to orders received from the Commanding-General, I marched my command to Mechanicsville, and encamped in the near neighborhood thereof. On the 2d Field's division was moved to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The spirit of 1861--correspondence of General R. E. Lee. (search)
The spirit of 1861--correspondence of General R. E. Lee. [The following hitherto unpublished letters are of interest and value as Illustrating the spirit of the early days of the war.] Alexandria, April 23, 1861. My Dear Robert — The enclosed letter was written to me, as you will see, in consequence of a remark I made to Dr. Sparrow, which he repeated to the writer, Dr. May, that I hoped your connection with the Virginia forces — if you concluded to accept the command — might lea the passions and reason to resume her sway. Virginia has to-day, I understand, joined the Confederate States. Her policy will doubtless therefore be shaped by united counsels. I cannot say what it will be, but trust that a merciful Providence will not dash us from the height to which his smiles had raised us. I wanted to say many things to you before I left home, but the event was rendered so imperatively speedy that I could not. May God preserve you and yours. Very truly, R. E. Lee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate career of General Albert Sidney Johnston. (search)
us journey, escorted by a few devoted friends and followers who meant to share his fortunes, and arrived in Texas, to be welcomed with a burst of joy and congratulation which spread through the Confederacy. He had already been appointed-so soon, in fact, as Mr. Davis learned of his resignation--one of the five Generals, for the appointment of whom the Confederate Congress had made provision. These five Generals were ranked as follows: 1. S. Cooper, Adjutant-General; 2. A. S. Johnston; 3. R. E. Lee; 4. J. E. Johnston; 5. G. T. Beauregard. General Johnston was assigned on the 10th September, 1861, to the command of Department No. 2, embracing, as described in the order assigning him to it, The States of Tennessee and Arkansas, and that part of the State of Mississippi west of the New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern and Central railroad; also the military operations in Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas and the Indian country immediately west of Missouri and Arkansas. Up to this date the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
r the army with which General Grant opposed General Lee, Secretary Stanton (page 5) puts the aggregns, or in Hunter's expedition, which latter General Lee was compelled to meet by heavy detachments uregard had in front of Butler, or which joined Lee at any time during the campaign, and there rema had on that campaign four times as many men as Lee could command. General Grant says that Lee Lee was of a slow, cautious, conservative nature. But when military critics come to study this campaigGrant crossed the Rapidan with his mighty host, Lee, instead of retreating, advanced at once upon hdealing him the crushing defeat at Cold Harbor, Lee was just about to attack Grant when he crossed ble-talk as true, but will rather conclude that Lee was one of the boldest soldiers of all history.The simple truth is that on that great campaign Lee foiled Grant in every move he made, defeated hiother words, he lost about twice as many men as Lee had in order to take a position which he could [2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General S. McGowan of battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Courthouse. (search)
ce to support it. Whilst in this position a heavy fire of musketry was opened on our right at the Plank road upon the division of General Heth. An officer of Lieutenant-General Hill's staff in a few minutes galloped up, and in the absence of General Wilcox (who was with Generals Lane and Thomas) ordered me to return at once to the Plank road. As the fire was very heavy, I did return hastily without waiting for the orders of Major-General Wilcox. As I approached the point of fire, I met General Lee, who directed me to proceed down the Plank road and report to General Heth, who was conducting the fight. I did so, and was directed by him to deploy my brigade on both sides of the Plank road, and, if possible, drive the enemy down towards the Brock road. I was instructed to put three regiments on the left and two on the right of the road; but as the formation was made under fire, I soon perceived that the enemy pressed heaviest on the right of the road, and I therefore took the libert
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wilderness. (search)
ce to support it. Whilst in this position a heavy fire of musketry was opened on our right at the Plank road upon the division of General Heth. An officer of Lieutenant-General Hill's staff in a few minutes galloped up, and in the absence of General Wilcox (who was with Generals Lane and Thomas) ordered me to return at once to the Plank road. As the fire was very heavy, I did return hastily without waiting for the orders of Major-General Wilcox. As I approached the point of fire, I met General Lee, who directed me to proceed down the Plank road and report to General Heth, who was conducting the fight. I did so, and was directed by him to deploy my brigade on both sides of the Plank road, and, if possible, drive the enemy down towards the Brock road. I was instructed to put three regiments on the left and two on the right of the road; but as the formation was made under fire, I soon perceived that the enemy pressed heaviest on the right of the road, and I therefore took the libert
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg — the battle on the right. (search)
xercising that vigilance and sagacity which his high position and duty required, the moment that his troops got possession of Round Top, he would have reinforced them and have sent at least a portion of his artillery to occupy it, and thus have secured the position which General Meade admits would have rendered it impossible for him to have held the ground he then occupied. It would have won the battle, or at least have forced Meade to have abandoned his position. So great a general as R. E. Lee never orders an impossibility. Having written all that I purposed writing, it is, perhaps, in bad taste to add anything more; but at the risk of criticism, I will relate two incidents of the battle. The following did not come under my own observation, but I am satisfied of its correctness, and relate it as I received it. Any one who knows old Colonel Mike Bulger, of Tallapoosa county, Alabama, will see that it is characteristic. As already stated, he fell severely wounded on the eve
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. (search)
ymen. By the terms of agreement, officers and men can return to their homes and remain until exchanged. You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed, and I earnestly pray that a merciful God will extend to you his blessing and protection. With an unceasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your country, and a grateful remembrance of your kind and generous consideration for myself, I bid you all an affectionate farewell. R. E. Lee. This grand farewell from the man who had in the past personfied the glory of his army and now bore its grief in his own great heart, was the signal for tearful partings. Comrades wept as they gazed upon each other, and with choking voices said, farewell! And so,--they parted. Little groups of two or three or four, without food, without money, but with the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed, were soon plodding their way homeward.
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