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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Officers of Gen. R. E. Lee's staff. (search)
promoted Brigadier General in December, 1863, and Colonel Walter H. Taylor then became Adjutant General of the Army of Northern Virginia, which position he held until the surrender, April 9, 1865. The Chiefs of Departments who served under General Lee were as follows: Lieutenant Colonel E. Porter Alexander, Chief of Ordnance, June 1, 1862, to November, 1862, Brigadier General Artillery to April 9, 1865. Lieutenant Colonel Briscoe G. Baldwin, Chief of Ordnance, November, 1862, to Aprilal Department: Surgeon Joseph E. Claggett, in charge of Hospital. Surgeon E. J. Breckinridge, Medical Inspector. Surgeon T. H. Wingfield. Surgeon James C. Herndon. Surgeon Samuel M. Bemiss. Surgeon E. D. Newton. Others who served on General Lee's Staff: Allen, John M., Captain and Assistant Forage Q. M., A. N. V. Bell, R. S., Assistant Q. M. of Forage. Bernard, J. T., Captain in charge of Ordnance Train. Brook, John W., Lieutenant Virginia Navy, A. A. D. C., May, 1861.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
Broun. Charleston, W. Va., August, 1886. From Gen. Fitzhuigh Lees book on Gen. Robert E. Lee, 1894. Traveller, the most distinguished of the General's warhorses, was born near Blue Sulphur Springs, in West Virginia, and was purchased by General Lee from Major Thomas L. Broun, who bought him from Captain James W. Johnson, the son of the gentleman who reared him. General Lee saw him first in West Virginia and afterwards in South Carolina, and was greatly pleased with his appearance. As soGeneral Lee saw him first in West Virginia and afterwards in South Carolina, and was greatly pleased with his appearance. As soon as Major Broun ascertained that fact the horse was offered the general as a gift, but he declined, and Major Broun then sold him. He was four years old in the spring of 1861, and therefore only eight when the war closed. He was greatly admired for his rapid, springy walk, high spirit, bold carriage and muscular strength. When a colt he took the first premium at the Greenbrier Fair, under the name of Jeff Davis. The General changed his name to Traveller. He oftenrode him in Lexington afte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
nearly every boy who could, or felt he could, be a soldier tried to enlist, and this, too, generally with the consent of their parents, for otherwise the boys would have been likely to have run off and enlisted anyway. The company was a pretty green one, including the captain, lieutenants, drivers and all the members of the battery; they had had little or no experience in drilling, in caring for the horses attached to the guns, and in every respect was a very crude organization. After General Lee had driven General McClellan from the gates of Richmond and began to move towards Maryland in the first campaign of invasion across the Potomac, the boy company reported to Colonel S. D. Lee, who had a battalion of three batteries of artillery, all of whom had seen service in battle. When on the march towards the battlefield of Second Manassas the boy company reported to make the fourth battery of the battalion. When the battery reported Colonel Lee was shocked that such a company of i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
iers for generations; that his father had been a captain in the English Army, and that he had longed as a boy to quit school, cross the ocean, and share the fortunes of the Confederacy. But from that time he had remained a sturdy and steadfast Confederate, and every day for nearly forty years has flown the Confederate flag on his lawn. The flag is regularly raised at sunrise, lowered at sunset, and placed at half-mast on April 9th, October 12th, the anniversaries of the surrender and of General Lee's death. I found his library full of books relating to our war, and was amazed at his minute knowledge of our Virginia campaign. Such invincible and romantic devotion to the Lost Cause merits, I think, proper recognition on the part of us old Confederates, and it has occurred to me that it would be eminently fitting that Lee Camp should honor him with honorary membership in that veteran organization. I need not say that not in the remotest manner did I ever hint to Mr. Smythe tha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
of which Albert Sidney Johnston was colonel, Robert E. Lee, lieutenant-colonel, and Hardee and George H. Thomas, majors—nearly every one of the officers of that regiment became distinguished soldiers in the Confederate or Union Army. He was quick and bright as a dollar, and while never what may be strictly termed a student, he absorbed information intuitively, and could read men and things like a book. He became a captivating public speaker and lecturer, and his Life and Campaigns of General Lee is exceedingly interesting and valuable, not only to the student of military affairs, but to the general reader. His address on Chancellorsville, a battle the most illustrative of what the highest military genius and audacity can accomplish with greatly inferior numbers and resources, is an admirable contribution to history. He was a born soldier. Early became famous in conflicts with the Indians. General Scott, in published orders, says: Major Van Dorn notices the conspicuous gal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The surrender of Gen. R. E. Lee. (search)
cluding some old Confederate veterans, positively state that Lee did offer his sword to Grant, and that the latter was magnanry of General Grant's refusal to accept the surrender of General Lee's sword at Appomattox, a story without a particle of fouvernor Sayers as saying: And finally Appomattox came and General Lee surrendered; the great, heroic, magnanimous Grant refuseshall, who was, I believe, the only officer accompanying General Lee on the occasion, has disclaimed that anything of the kinniscences of General Robert E. Lee, at page 303, reports General Lee as making a similar statement during a conversation withuietus to that widely circulated romance that he returned to Lee his proffered sword. I do not doubt that he would have done so; but there was no occasion for Lee's offering it, because in the terms agreed upon it was stipulated that the Confederate their sidearms. I have seen a Northern history in which Lee was represented as presenting his sword to Grant. Correct h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hood's Brigade. (search)
us wherever heroism is admired. As soon as General Lee assumed command of the army he undertook a under Jackson and that on the south bank under Lee, were reunited. On the morning of the 27th oe afternoon the Texas Brigade, under the eye of Lee, led by the gallant Hood, swept forward to storsplendid achievements which henceforth attended Lee's Army. Others have claimed the credit of beelves, for in addition we have as witnesses General Lee, who commanded the Confederate Army, and Geth Texas to storm the enemy's works, he met General Lee, who announced to him that our troops had band gone to the neighborhood of Washington, and Lee was merely seeking him out. Meantime, McClellanith about 50,000 Federal troops, confronted General Lee, in command of about 75,000 Confederates. fords on the Potomac captured by the enemy, and Lee's army shut in between the Antietam and the Poteaped, or fortified position to be carried, General Lee knew no better troops upon which to rely. [6 more...]