Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert E. Lee or search for Robert E. Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
regards the movements of the two brigades of the enemy moving toward Warrenton, the commander of the brigades must do what he can to counteract them, but I think the sooner you cross into Maryland, after to-morrow, the better. The movements of Ewell's corps are as stated in my former letter. Hill's first division will reach the Potomac today, and Longstreet will follow tomorrow. Be watchful and circumspect in all your movements. I am very respectfully and truly yours, (Signed), R. E. Lee, General. The letter of the 23rd was written by General Lee after receiving two notes from General Stuart, which; no doubt stated in reply to his letter of the 22nd that General Hooker's army was still inactive, although Mosby did not so report to General Stuart until the next day. In it General Lee tells Stuart that Longstreet and Hill are moving to the Potomac; and Stuart chose the route via Seneca, with full knowledge that they were following Ewell. According to the first order,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Armistead's portrait presented. (search)
General Armistead's portrait presented. An address delivered before R. E. Lee camp no. 1, C. V., Richmond, Va., January 29, 1909. By Rev. James E. Poindexter, Late Captain in 38th Virginia Regiment, Armistead's Brigade, Pickett's Division. Mr. Commander and Comrades: It was my wish that this address should be made by Col. Rawley W. Martin, of Lynchburg, who led the Fifty-third Virginia in Pickett's charge, and fell by the side of Armistead on Cemetary Ridge. But this could not be, and so I come to take his place. For the task assigned me I feel myself but poorly equipped. Unlike Col. Martin, I followed our old Commander, as St. Peter followed the Master, afar off. It is, I may say, with unfeigned diffidence that I venture to speak of war to the veteran soldiers who are here to-night. On me, however, through your kindness, is this honor conferred, that I should present to the Camp the portrait of Lewis A. Armistead. I thank you for it with all my heart. The Arm
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Story of battle of five Forks. (search)
ponent part of Grant's army, and scarcely lived in name. In The Army of Northern Virginia all answered to its last roll call that had not already made final answer at the summons of the Master. Each of these two great armies had found in the other, a foreman worthy of its steel, and each, in a manner, lies buried in a common grave, overwhelmed by a tidal wave. With the surrender of The Army of Northern Virginia ended the life of The Confederate States, whose birth-throes shook a continent. The Confederate States died a—borning, and upon its in Memoriam, With spirit pointing to heaven this inscription: No nation rose so white and fair, None fell so pure of crime, Will survive the effacements of time; and two figures will always stand out upon it in bold relief— Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee. Around them, the others will be grouped. Near to them, perhaps, nearest, will be: Jackson and Forrest. Robert M. Stribling. Markham, Fauquier county,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's last camp. (search)
note in the bottom of his sock, but he was searched, and the money taken from him. Many of the people of this vicinity took refuge in a nearby mountain until both armies had passed. On the return march the Federal forces spent a night at a place called New Store, which is owned by Mr. Louis D. Jones, and many of the Federal officers spent the night at Mr. Jones' house. General Nelson A. Miles was one of the officers in charge, and he made his men behave as they should. Meanwhile General R. E. Lee had taken another route leading toward Richmond, and passing through this village with only his personal attendant, he was recognized by a lovely lady, who went out and asked the privilege of shaking his hand. General Lee only went two miles further when, night coming on, he decided to camp in a piece of woods on the place then owned by a widow, Mrs. Martha Shepherd. When his tent was made and Mrs. Shepherd learned of the fact that this distinguished soldier was preparing to camp so
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ter, his invaluable service on the retreat from Gettysburg, are, I think, universally acknowledged. They were long ago celebrated, among others, by General Fitzhugh Lee in his description of the Gettysburg Campaign contained in his life of Gen. Robert E. Lee, pp. 265-6. It is remarkable that Col. Mosby should include Gen. Fitz. Lee among those who have thrown the blame of the Gettysburg campaign, on Stuart. For Gen. Lee says: This officer has been unjustly criticised for not being in front r front) retire from the mountains west of the Shenandoah, leaving sufficient pickets to guard the passes, and bringing everything clean along the Valley, closing upon the rear of the army. I am very respectfully and truly yours, (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. Thus, in the very last communication received by General Stuart from General Lee, the order was emphatically given that as soon as he crossed the river, he should place his command on Ewell's right and march with him towards the S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Munford's Marylanders never surrendered to foe. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. (search)
Munford's Marylanders never surrendered to foe. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. Belonged to famous command which cut its way out on Eve of Lee's surrender. By John R. Stonebraker. After repulsing the Yankees when we made the last charge at Appomattox, and General Munford, having most emphatically declined to be included in the surrender of General R. E. Lee's army, General Munford's command moved off slowly and unmolested, reaching Lynchburg that afternoon. The First Maryland Cavalry crossed the James River about dark and encamped in the Fair Grounds. At sunrise the next morning, April 10, we were formed in line, and Colonel Dorsey informed us that it had been determined at yesterday's conference to disband the cavalry for a short time. Acting upon this agreement, we were free to go where we pleased until April 25, when he would expect every man to meet him at the Cattle Scales, in Augusta county. We at once broke ranks; our color-bearer, John Ridg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Who was last soldier to leave burning city. (search)
y orders. This was in the face of the cavalry of General Wetzel's army, who had poured down Fourteenth street in pursuit of Garey. I then marched on and overtook my division on the road to Amelia Courthouse about 2 P. M., that day. Coincidence of Promotion.. This same account was published in the Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, issued by the Century Magazine some twentyfive or thirty years ago. That magazine, having learned in some manner that I was the last soldier of General R. E. Lee's army to leave Richmond, wrote to me for a narrative of the circumstances of my retreat. Colonel Sulivane has written elsewhere: Concerning that retreat from Richmond there has been a curious coincidence of record between Lieutenant-Colonel H. Kyd Douglas, of Hagerstown, Md., and myself. When not quite twenty-three we both left our homes in Maryland and enlisted as private soldiers in the Confederate Army in the spring of 1861. That fall we were both promoted to the staff a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ng parched corn, march from Richmond to Appomattox. And the surrender of Lee is accomplished! This was the very genius of war that suppressed the rebellion. Yes, they fought, and fought, and fought, till they wore out the opposition. But whom did they fight, and how? The Army of Northern Virginia is to pass through Maryland into Pennsylvania. Strict orders are given that all private property is to be respected, and noncombatants are in no way to be molested. The orders are signed by R. E. Lee, General. The battle of Gettysburg has been fought; Lee's army is marching through the enemy's country on the retreat. As he is riding along, sustaining by his matchless bearing the courage of his tired army, he sees that some one has thrown down a worm fence around a Pennsylvanian's wheatfield. He dismounts, and with the bridle of his horse over his arm, he puts up that fence, rail by rail, that he may protect the private property of the enemy! Evidently Lee did not have that kind o