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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 193 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 176 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 146 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 86 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
o the last, but who was entirely overwhelmed. From his speech I judge he was inclined to wander in his thoughts. You would not have recognized a Confederate officer from his dress, which was a blue military overcoat, a high grey hat, and well-brushed riding boots. As General Meade introduced his two aides, Lee put out his hand and saluted us with all the air of the oldest blood in the world. I did not think, when I left, in 1863, for Germantown, that I should ever shake the hand of Robert E. Lee, prisoner of war! He held a long conference with General Meade, while I stood over a fire, with his officers, in the rain. Colonel Marshall, one of his aides, was a very sensible and gentlemanly man, and seemed in good spirits. He told me that, at one time during the retreat, he got no sleep for seventy-two hours, the consequence of which was that his brain did not work at all, or worked all wrong. A quartermaster came up to him and asked by what route he should move his train: to wh
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
. Jeter, —, 129. Jetersville, 342, 345, 349. John, history of, 274. Johnson, Edward, 111. Johnson, —, 183. Johnston, Joseph, 102n. Joinville, Prince de, 95. Kearny, Philip, 139. Kellogg, —, 61. Kelly's Ford, 43. Kelly's house, 140, 143. Kennedy, Joseph Camp Griffith, 73. Kent, —, 179. Kilpatrick, Judson, 15, 68, 76; raid, 77, 79. Kirkpatrick, —, 274. Landron house, 114. Lazelle, Henry Martyn, 286. Leave of absence, 59. Ledlie, James Hewitt, 167, 199, 310. Lee, Robert Edward, 163, 184; movement by, 29, 30; retreat, 102; annihilation, 124; character, 125; Appomattox campaign, 303, 305; effort to escape, 349; surrenders, 355, 357; described, 360. Lee, William Henry Fitzhugh, 362. Leigh, Bishop, 281. Letterman, Jonathan, 22. Lever, Charles James, Tony Butler, 260. Lincoln, Abraham, 319; merciful policy, 117; reelection, 154, 204, 245, 259; government, 247; review of troops, 322; described, 324. Linear house, 220. Locke, Frederick Thomas, rem