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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 193 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 176 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 146 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 86 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 114 results in 27 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
f the historian. It has been said of General Robt. E. Lee that he often expressed the fear lest passed our camp; he replied that it was General Robert E. Lee, who at that time was little known to just learned, too, of the check received by General Lee at the battle of Gettysburg, and now came tson from the east; the coil of the snake around Lee and the Capital was becoming too close for him ll arms. This communication was sent to you at Lee and Gordon's Mills during the afternoon of the which is to be mounted a colossal statue of R. E. Lee, now being rapidly pushed to completion. hroughout the civilized world. The name of Robt. E. Lee is held in reverence throughout christendom tired of talking of Albert Sidney Johnston, R. E. Lee, Hardie, Kirby Smith, Van Dome, Fitzhugh Lee Gentleman, Grand in War, Great in Peace—Robert Edward Lee. Norman G. Kittrell. 9. The Army of thusiastic audience. The duty of introducing General Lee had been most appropriately assigned to Jud[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our cause in history. (search)
e of peace, memory reproduces, in mimic minature, to kindle again the smouldering fires in the soldier's breast. It is however, Sir, the duty, as it is the pleasure, of man, to look both backward and forward; and therefore, while memory plays her part to-night in recalling the past, you have directed that we should project our thoughts into the future to inquire how that Cause, which still remains dear to your hearts, shall fare at the hands of the historian. It has been said of General Robt. E. Lee that he often expressed the fear lest posterity should not know the odds against which he fought. What then was in the mind of the great warrior? Was he apprehensive lest his military fame should suffer? Was he fearful that his name might not be written large on the annals of history? All who knew that man know full well no such thought found harbour in his breast. No solicitude respecting his future fame disturbed the serenity of a mind lifted above the petty ambitions of person
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
tion very much by his personal appearance. He was a noble looking soldier, had the eye of an eagle; he was riding a fine gray steed, and there was something about this officer that challenged my admiration and esteem. He rode up and spoke to me, and asked me where was General Wise's brigade. I informed him; he thanked me and rode in the direction I had given him. Upon meeting one of my officers I asked who was that noble looking officer just passed our camp; he replied that it was General Robert E. Lee, who at that time was little known to the Confederacy, but was destined to become one of the greatest captains the world ever saw, and whose name will ever live upon the brightest page of the historian. After remaining at Little Sewell mountain upwards of two weeks, General Lee made preparations to attack General Rosecrans; contrary, doubtless, to General Lee's expectations, on the morning the attack was to be made, General Rosecrans had very quietly evacuated Big Sewell, and only l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
ll of Vicksburg, and the consequent opening of the Mississippi river to the Federal fleet, from the mountains to the sea, a disaster that secured to the enemy the grand object of his most strenuous exertions, while it severed the young Confederacy in twain and deprived our armies east of the river of all the aid and comfort in the way of material supplies and gallant recruits, that had been so long and so freely drawn from the west bank. We had just learned, too, of the check received by General Lee at the battle of Gettysburg, and now came the summons to tell that our turn had come for a little squeeze in the folds of the traditional Anaconda, that the New York Herald had so graphically depicted as encircling the South. The men received the orders with enthusiasm—indeed, when was it otherwise with the Southern soldier. Thoroughly conversant, as they all were, with the details of the war, they could not but be depressed by the news of such grave reverses to our arms as the mornin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
d made himself, how essential to our cause, how foremost in all our hopes. And when his great Superior said [with a magnanimity which matches Jackson's heroism], Tell him he has lost his left arm; but I have lost my right arm; all men felt, Yea! Lee has lost his right arm; the cause has lost its right arm. And the thickening disasters which that loss soon entailed, taught them, educated them, for a time, to appreciate Jackson's as the transcendant fame of all our war. It sounded in every truhe great Valley to Harrisonburg. He brought with him, perhaps, a force of twelve thousand men, footsore from forced marches, and decimated by their own victories. No more succours could come to Jackson from the east; the coil of the snake around Lee and the Capital was becoming too close for him to assist others; and all that the government expected of Jackson was, to retreat indefinitely, fortunate if he could at once escape complete destruction, and detain the pursuers from a concentration
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
his colonists, the pyrotechnic display at night, the trades parade on the 13th, the immense crowd of people, and other interesting features, seem to have made the celebration a grand success. We deeply regretted that we could not accept a highly appreciated invitation to be present. in the death of Rev. Dr. (General) W. N. Pendleton, at his home in Lexington, Va., on the evening of January 15th, there has passed away another of our prominent Confederate leaders. As classmate of General R. E. Lee at West Point, his Chief of Artillery during the war, and his Pastor during his residence in Lexington, General Pendleton was closely connected with our great chieftain in life, and now sleeps well, hard by his grave, while the spirits of the two soldiers, who were faithful to cross and country, doubtless bask together in the smiles of the great Captain of our Salvation. Of strong intellect, broad culture, firm convictions, devoted patriotism, earnest piety, and evangelical spirit,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. (search)
me to you and General D. H. Hill, then with his corps at Lafayette, where I had my own headquarters. Thinking, as I then saw no effort to avail ourselves of the enemy's extraordinary dispersion of his army, that his object and position might be misapprehended, I wrote directly to you a somewhat lengthy communication, in regard to the isolated fragment of Thomas's corps then at Davis's Cross-Roads in the Cove, between 9 and 11,000 strong, of all arms. This communication was sent to you at Lee and Gordon's Mills during the afternoon of the day preceding the abortive movement. Between 12 and 1 o'clock that night I received an order to report to you in person, at General Hill's quarters. On my arrival I found a Major of engineers—in broken English giving you a very incoherent report of the topography of the Cove, and the situation of the enemy's troops and our own. He was urging you to change the orders you had given for an attack upon the enemy by General Hindman. I remember ve
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
and in glory to the Army of Tennessee. Glorious and grand old army! Defenders of the heart of the Confederacy, the tests to which your virtues were put called forth the highest qualities that soldiers could display. Unfailing courage, patience, endurance, fortitude and devotion marked your every step. From that field on it bore the stamp of misfortune in losing Albert Sidney Johnston. And who of the Fifth Company would change that checkered career for even the glory of having served with Lee and Jackson? Corinth comes next and Farmington. Incessant picket fighting, dire disease, wretched rations, and death dealing water. A crucial test, which the strongest and bravest alone survived. A school, withal, which tempered us for the worst that could arise. Tupelo is reached, and Slocomb now commands. Suffering is forgotten in recuperation and drilling. Bragg himself acknowledges the Fifth unexcelled therein, even by his famous battery. We march into Kentucky. Mumfordsvil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
eted a very handsome monument, on which is to be mounted a colossal statue of R. E. Lee, now being rapidly pushed to completion. Besides this, these organizationsears a name honored and revered throughout the civilized world. The name of Robt. E. Lee is held in reverence throughout christendom as the synonym of all that is goound that old citizens here never tired of talking of Albert Sidney Johnston, R. E. Lee, Hardie, Kirby Smith, Van Dome, Fitzhugh Lee, and others of the officers of te Matchless Soldier, the Knightly Gentleman, Grand in War, Great in Peace—Robert Edward Lee. Norman G. Kittrell. 9. The Army of the Trans-Mississippi Department, Jed us at New Orleans, continued with us until we left the State. At night General Lee lectured, under the auspices of the Waco Lyceum, and notwithstanding the bad(March 7th) a large and most enthusiastic audience. The duty of introducing General Lee had been most appropriately assigned to Judge R. C. Beale, who had entered t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Life and character of Ex-Governor B. G. Humphreys of Mississippi. (search)
him special educational advantages, which at that early day were purchased at great expense and inconvenience. He passed through a preparatory course in a classical school at Morristown, New Jersey, a State long ago famous for its educational facilities, and afterwards received an appointment of cadetship in the national school at West Point. And while there he was associated as classmate and confederate with such men as Jefferson Davis, Joseph E. Johnston, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee, men of whom Southern history and Southern chivalry shall ever be justly proud. It might have been expected that by such associations and influences he would have been tempted at once into public life; but public life as a matter of profession seemed to have no attractions for him, and returning to his native home he devoted himself to the unostentatious calling of a planter's life. And in this pursuit, which engaged but a small share of his diversified gifts, he found happiness a
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