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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 193 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 176 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 146 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 86 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
icious effects of slavery, were all believed to have had their influence, and to have produced a weak and vacillating people. Had luxury enervated them, had they become effeminate, had the increase of wealth and the impress of slavery rendered them physically and intellectually inferior to the men of the North? If any so believe, let the deeds of arms that have passed into history speak. Examine the details of the well-contested battlefields and see if such a declaration is true. Jackson, Lee, Johnson, Claiborne, Stuart and Forrest! What tender thoughts, what hallowed associations gather around the names of these bright stars in the Southern constellation! Does all history, does even the field of romance furnish heroes superior or patriots more noble? They were the leaders of an equally brave and noble people, who, when all save honor was lost, submitted to the inevitable with a dignity born only of true greatness. And now of the Confederate surgeon let me say a word. How c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate surgeons. (search)
f tension—so much higher than mere illness, which is far below the battlefield in the stirring intensity or the elevation of the emotion it excites—that he was not impressed by his present peril, however imminent might be the fate which it threatened. He was therefore languid, careless and indifferent, and his mind needed to be aroused and stimulated. As a striking proof of the apathy of the soldier when he takes asylum in hospital, it may be stated that on the occasion of a visit by General Lee to the farm, near Petersburg, to which the sick and wounded had been removed, he visited many of the tents. There was not the slightest excitement or enthusiasm manifested—no exclamation or apparent recognition of their beloved leader by a single individual. Politeness compelled us to occupy a singular role, and in every instance to announce the presence of their commanderin-chief and to introduce him to his soldiers. What a contrast to their reception on every other occasion, as whe<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Gen. C. R. Wheat, commander of the Louisiana Tiger Battalion (search)
position in the Federal army. General Wheat had a great affection for his old commander, and a still greater for the old flag. It was, therefore, a most painful sacrifice to sever those ties which had been made more sacred by much service and suffering in their behalf. But he felt the call of a still higher and holier duty, and he obeyed; it was to stand in the lot, and to share the fortunes of his own people and kindred and family. In the spirit which animated that purest of patriots, R. E. Lee, and from a like stern sense of duty, he gave his hand with his heart in it to the South. Stopping but a day at Montgomery, Ala., then the seat of the Confederate government, to learn the situation of affairs and the probable opening of the campaign, he hurried on to New Orleans, where he hoped to raise a regiment of volunteers for immediate service. Before his arrival the Governor of the State, by authority of the Convention which passed the Ordinance of Secession, had put in commissi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual Reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
arms, and a storm-cradled nation is dead. It was characteristic of Lee's greatness that while he accepted success with unselfish modesty, he always met adversity splendidly. The chapter in military history is yet to be written which presents a nobler scene than that of the greatest soldier of modern times riding among his shattered troops at Gettysburg, consoling them as no other mortal could, and taking upon himself the whole responsibility of failure. And great as he always was, Robert E. Lee never so filled the full stature of perfect manhood as on that fatal field where he sheathed his stainless sword forever. What brush of painter, unguided by the inspiration of more than mortal genius, what song of poet, unattuned to notes befitting the minstrelsy of heaven, what orator whose lips have not been touched by a live coal from off the altar of Divine eloquence, what historian whose pen has not been dipped in the blood of heroes, may fitly portray such scenes and such charac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Life, services and character of Jefferson Davis. (search)
h Him and man. As free from envy as he was from malice, he was foremost in recognizing, applauding, and eulogizing the great character and achievements of General R. E. Lee, and with his almost dying hand he wove a chaplet of evergreen beauty to lay upon his honored brow. Rigid Adherence to principle. Sternly did he stand carried home with them the consciousness of duty faithfully performed. We should rejoice that if weak men wavered before the end, neither Jefferson Davis, nor Robert E. Lee, nor Joseph E. Johnston wavered. Though they and their compeers could not achieve the independence of the Confederacy, they did preserve the independent and u If some Messioner could throw upon the canvas Jefferson Davis in the midst of those chiefs whom he created, what grander knighthood could history assemble? Robert E. Lee, Albert Sidney Johnston, Joseph E. Johnston, G. T. Beauregard, Samuel Cooper, and Braxton Bragg were generals of the full rank. Stonewall Jackson, Forrest,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Georgia Infantry. (search)
he same sort. R. T. D. [2] operations in Cheat Mountain, etc. Orders of Gen. R. E. Lee. Special order No.—. headquarters Valley Mountain, 8th September, 1find a defender. The progress of the army must then be forward. (Signed,) R. E. Lee, General Commanding. Gen. Henry R. Jackson, Monterey Line, furnished through which gives assurance of victory when a fit opportunity offers. (Signed,) R. E. Lee, General Commanding. Gen. H. R. Jackson, Monterey Line, through Gen. Loring. . Killed,4 Wounded,35 Missing,10 — Total,49 [13] letter from Gen. R. E. Lee to Col. Edward Willis. Confidential. Headquarters, 11th March, 1864that has occupied you during the winter. Very resp'y, Your ob't serv't, R. E. Lee, General. Col. Edward Willis, 12. Geo. Regiment. Envelope superscribed Confidential. in left hand corner; franked R. E. Lee, General, in right hand corner, and addressed Col. Edward Willis, Command'g 12. Geo. Regiment. Letter and supe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. History of the movement for its erection. [Compileo enjoys and him who deserves success. Robert E. Lee was my associate and friend in the militarn the different parts of the army. One day General Lee received a letter from a private soldier, ws sure there must be some necessity for it. General Lee did not reply directly to the letter, but id. The information about the late lamented General Lee, which I wish to communicate to you, is as a hundred yards from the works when we saw General Lee standing beside his horse giving orders to le-field. There is hardly an incident in General Lee's life, great or small, when he was called s the highest tribute that was ever paid to General Lee was paid by General Grant himself at Appomael would be accepted by the whole North. General Lee expressed the great pleasure which General olved upon them. The advice and example of General Lee did more to incline the scale in favor of a[31 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Incidents of the parade. (search)
Incidents of the parade. Passing Lee's residence. When the procession turned up Franklin street from Eighth, Governor Lee and General Wade Hampton, who headed the line, uncovered their heads and held their hats in their hands until they had passed the house of General Robert E. Lee, No. 707 East Franklin street. The two genGovernor Lee and General Wade Hampton, who headed the line, uncovered their heads and held their hats in their hands until they had passed the house of General Robert E. Lee, No. 707 East Franklin street. The two generals were the recipients of loud cheers at this point. Their eyes rested steadily and reverently upon the house. The cavalry bugler blew a call and loud cheers went up from the multitude congregated at this, what seemed to be the centre place of interest to a large number. The Hanover cavalry received loud cheering as they pasGeneral Robert E. Lee, No. 707 East Franklin street. The two generals were the recipients of loud cheers at this point. Their eyes rested steadily and reverently upon the house. The cavalry bugler blew a call and loud cheers went up from the multitude congregated at this, what seemed to be the centre place of interest to a large number. The Hanover cavalry received loud cheering as they passed the house and raised their hats. The eyes of every company rested upon the house in passing. The military companies were ordered to Right shoulder arms, and Lee Camp Drum Corps and the Navy Post Band of Norfolk each played Dixie. All of the veterans marched by with bared heads. Each of the bands played upon this square an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
onor the memory of Virginia's great soldier, R. E. Lee. To the care and custody of James R. Wheeleof this great box, inscribed our Com-Mander, R. E. Lee, and containing a print of him. To this wous. Veterans in line. The veterans of R. E. Lee Camp, No. I, and George E. Pickett Camp, Coieutenant W. S. Dashiell, vice-president. R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1. Lee Camp with three flags an. M. R. Talcott, Richmond—all members of General R. E. Lee's staff; Generals Charles W. Field of Keits labors, to do honor to the memory of Robert Edward Lee, and give to them a cordial welcome. l its ages to produce a grander man than Robert Edward Lee. Arkansas is here with her gallant soest of our generals now living—the classmate of Lee. They graduated together; together they began tly chosen, one of the friends and companions of Lee, and one of his most distinguished generals—one Thou hast honored our land in the gift of Robert E. Lee! And we would present this monument to th[13 more...
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Testimonials from visiting soldiers. (search)
resumed. The old veterans of many a campaign are now accompanied by a stalwart battalion of young soldiers, who have grown up since war's alarms have ceased, and old and young are here with us to give tribute and praise to our old commander, Robert E. Lee, in the unveiling of a monument in bronze, enduring forever, to his high character. And now, comrades of the young company, I have the honor to present to you this memento from our departed guests, immortelles from the bier of Jefferson Davi cherished relics of the past. Captain Hutchinson. Captain Hutchinson in receiving the gift said: I am not much of a speech-maker, but I cannot refrain from the expression of our sincere thanks for the memento presented. The memory of Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, and Stonewall Jackson shall ever remain green in our hearts, and we have no less reverence for the men who followed those illustrious leaders. This memento shall ever be sacred, and shall hang on the walls of the Armory as
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