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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 193 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 176 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 146 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 86 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 97 results in 19 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lane's Corps of sharpshooters. (search)
ved with conspicuous gallantry in the presence of General Lee. That afternoon, after the brigade had attacked Burnside's corps in flank, General Lee sent for Lane, told him he had witnessed their gallant behavior and the order. When Nicholson reported for instructions, General Lee especially cautioned him to let his men know that. Every cap was waved and cheer followed cheer. General Lee, superbly mounted, gracefully bared his head, andane was in command of his division. Next morning General Lee sent for Lane to know if he had re-established hih the enemy could fire into his winter quarters, General Lee asked if he could take the hill, and Lane replied asking if he could catch a Yankee that night for General Lee, as some of the enemy were moving and he could noreported: I couldn't get that promised Yankee for General Lee, but I caught seven Dutchmen. They were sent at dit of the capture to Wooten, and stating that if General Lee could make anything out of their foreign gibberis
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A secret-service episode [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, October 21, 1900.] (search)
Confederate camp of New York, is Captain Louis Zimmner. The venerable soldier tells the story in plain, unvarnished style, and displays the most authentic coroborative evidence of the deed from the highest military authority of the Confederacy, commissioned by Governor Letcher, of Virginia, for secret service duty, and with letters of highest commendation from Governor Letcher and General Francis H. Smith (the latter superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute), he reported to General Robert E. Lee, who in turn, assigned him to duty with Commodore Maury. The latter immediately ordered him to go into the enemy's country and bring out percussion caps, because at that time the supply was limited to but four rounds for each man then mustered into service. This is the old soldier's narrative: On March 4, 1861, I received orders from Commodore Maury to proceed to New York to purchase 1,000,000 percussion caps for the use of the army of Virginia, and for that purpose obtained a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
ction, and was in several skirmishes. The services of the men and non-commissioned officers were arduous, indeed, owing to the severity of the cold in that mountainous country. In 1862 it served in Major George Jackson's squadron, under General R. E. Lee, at Valley Mountain, in West Virginia. From this place the company went to Churchville, Augusta county, Va. In April, 1862, it was reorganized, and new officers elected. From Churchville, under the command of Major George Jackson, this anthe Churchville cavalry, second in command. In 1863 the 14th, with several other regiments, 16th and 17th cavalry, with V. A. Witcher's battalion of cavalry, were put under General A. G. Jenkins. Jenkins's Brigade was in advance of General R. E. Lee's army in 1863, when it invaded Pennsylvania. Our brigade was in the battle of Martinsburg, Va., where we captured (with the aid of other troops), the town, artillery and prisoners. In June, 1863, this company and the Churchville cavalry char
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
our battery reached Gaines' Mill, and pulling up to the top of the hill, found several batteries waiting for orders, among them Pegram's, Crenshaw's, the Dixie Battery and others. The fighting in the woods to the right of the road and about 150 feet therefrom, was terrific. Fitz John Porter, as true and gallant a soldier as ever fought, was holding the right of McClellan's line with some of the best troops in the army, among them Sykes' Brigade of regulars. Just after we halted, General R. E. Lee and staff rode up and stopped, evidently regarding this point as the most critical along the whole line. Several efforts were made to get General Lee to retire, as now and then one of our men or horses would be shot. He refused, however, to leave and it was well he did not, for about that time a South Carolina brigade commenced coming out of the woods perfectly panic-stricken. General Lee ordered our guns unlimbered, then turning to the men around him, among whom I recall Major Lind
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Glowing tribute to General R. E. Lee. (search)
Glowing tribute to General R. E. Lee. An unequalled leader of an incomparable host. With a tribute to the character and ability of General R. E. Lee From Lord Wolseley, commander-in-chief of the British Army. In celebration of GeneGeneral R. E. Lee From Lord Wolseley, commander-in-chief of the British Army. In celebration of General Lee's birthday, on January 19th, 1899, the tenth annual banquet of Pickett-Buchanan Camp, Confederate Veterans, held at Atlantic Hotel, in Norfolk, was an interesting occasion. Among the toasts responded to was that entitled Lee and His Men; Ansignation of my commission as Colonel of the First Regiment of Cavalry. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, Colonel First Cavalry. The very next morning, just at daybreak, as I was checking my trunk, coming South, at Alexaiged for the newspaper containing a report of your recent speech upon the character and great military ability of General Robert E. Lee. I have always placed him high amongst the world's few great men and still fewer great leaders of nations. Bu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Very complete roll [from the Richmond, A., Dispatch, September 16th, 1900.] (search)
are fourteen months. Lives near Alonzaville. Sager, William Dallas—Wounded at Mine Run, November 27, 1863, and killed at Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864. Spengler, Samuel M.—Resides in Baltimore, Md. Samuels, Green B.—Wounded and captured at Winchester, September 19, 1664, and in Fort Delware prison until June 15, 1865. Promoted to lieutenant 1862. Brigade Inspector, 3rd Brigade, Stonewall Division. Aid to General R. T. Colston, commanding Stonewall Division at Chancellorsville. At R. E. Lee Camp, Soldier's Home. Spengler, Cyrus—Died since the war. Spiker, Elias Carson—Died February, 1862. Smoot, George W.—Died February, 1862 Sheetz, Isaac B.—Resides in Rockingham county. Samuels, Samuel C.—Killed at Spotsylvania, May 5, 1864. Shillingburg, Abr.—Wounded at Manassas, August 28, 1862. Surrendered at Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864. Confined in Fort Delaware prison until June 13, 1865. Lives near Mt. Olive, Va. Stanton, Benjamin J.—Surrendered at S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The correspondence of Gen. Robt. E. Lee. (search)
The correspondence of Gen. Robt. E. Lee. Chancellorsville to Gettysburg—March to August, 186ngly, not only the profound ability of General Robert E. Lee as a military chieftain, but also the ry of War. His army not supplied with food. R. E. Lee, March 29th, 1863, page 691, to Seddon Scoutd away by Department without his knowledge. R. E. Lee, April 1st, 1863, page 697, to General W. N.a), where supplies can be had in abundance. R. E. Lee, April 20, 1863, page 740, to Davis. Insuffiars disaster from insufficiency of cavalry. R. E. Lee, May 2, 1863, page 765, to Davis. If I had agard with them and put him in command here. R. E. Lee, May 20th, 1863, page 832, to DavisA. P. Hil, is the best soldier of his grade with me. R. E. Lee, May 30, 1863 page 832, to Davis.Requests thfor commissary, quartermaster, &c., trains. R. E. Lee to General A. P. Hill, page 859, June 5, 186awn from General Lee's command at Culpeper. R. E. Lee to General A. P. Hill, June 16, 1863.Informs[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
d prowess of a company, out of, as well as in, the forefront of battle. A good soldier, be it remembered, must suffer and endure on the wearisome march, and in the tiresome tented field, no less than in the fiercest battle. The battles in which Carpenter's Battery fought may be counted by scores, from its first bloody infantry charge at the first Manassas, and its artillery baptism at Kernstown, onward incessantly in every battle of the Army of Northern Virginia, to the closing scene of General Lee's desperate endeavor just before Appomattox. When it was Company A of the 27th Regiment, our good and brave first captain, Thompson McAllister, led it to deeds heroic in that first Manassas battle, where our losses were heavy, but where we gained a fighting name the soldier so dearly prizes, and then, too, we were only boy soldiers! The failure of Captain McAllister's health, occuring soon after that famous event, in which he bore so conspicuous a part, devolved the captaincy next o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of the history Committee of the Grand Camp C. V., Department of Virginia. (search)
tion, namely: the conduct of the North after the war in regard to Mr. Davis, General Lee, and others of our leaders. As is well known, Mr. Davis was indicted three and corporations (with the exception of one, which uses Hansell's), use either Mrs. Lee's or Dr. Jones' Histories, or the two conjointly, the relative use of these being as follows: Lee's, 68; Jones', 25; Lee and Jones, conjointly, 17. It will thus be seen, that the danger apprehended from the use of the two works criticised, Lee and Jones, conjointly, 17. It will thus be seen, that the danger apprehended from the use of the two works criticised, is reduced to the minimum. But we must not be satisfied until that danger is entirely removed by the abolishment of these books from the list of those adopted for ud led by Colonel John S. Mosby. This organization, whilst forming a part of General Lee's Army, and at all times subject to his orders, was to all intents and purpoe majority of our soldiers were non-slaveholders; (2) That our great leader, General Lee, had freed his slaves before the war, whilst General Grant held on to his un
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
it is manifest that both General A. P. Hill, to whose corps the division commanded by General Mahone belonged, and General R. E. Lee were laboring under a mistake, when, on the day of the battle, in their official reports, they referred to the retand staff, and 855 enlisted men. Upward of 500 of the enemy's dead are lying unburied in the trenches. His loss slight. R. E. Lee. Memorable service. If it was General Weisiger, and not General Mahone, whose service on the 30th of July, 1864ommunication to General Lee, published at page 1156, of serial 88 of the War Records. Richmond, August 2, 1864. (General R. E. Lee, Petersburg. Va.: Have ordered the promotion of General Mahone to date from the day of his memorable service, 30ds there is but one inference to be drawn, and that is, that, whatever the actual facts were, General A. P. Hill, General Robert E. Lee, and President Davis, who may properly be assumed to have voiced the current sentiment of the army and people of
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