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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 193 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 176 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 146 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 86 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
General Lee's Strategy at the battle of Chancellorsville. A paper read by request before R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V., May 20th, 1906. By T. M. R. Talcott, Major and Aide de Camp to General R. E. General R. E. Lee, in 1862-63, and later Colonel 1st Regiment Engineer Troops, A. N. V. [For the parole list of Engineer Troops surrendered at Appomattox C. H. and graphic account of the retreat from Petersburgt and won. The hearing you have kindly afforded me as a member of the personal staff of General R. E. Lee at the time of that battle. is on the subject of General R. E. Lee at Chancellorsville, aGeneral R. E. Lee at Chancellorsville, and what you wish to know particularly is, I presume, whether or not he conceived and directed the movement around the right flank, and the attack on the rear of Hooker's army. Both General Lee andshall's account of the matter. Subsequently, in 1886, General A. L. Long, in his Memoirs of R. E. Lee, gave his own recollections of how Jackson's movement originated, and corroborated them by a l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battlefields of Virginia. (search)
r the success of the Southern Review, and for your own welfare, in both of which I take a lively interest, I am, with great respect, your friend and servant, R. E. Lee. General A. L. Long, of General Lee's staff, in his Memoirs of Robert E. Lee, published in 1886, says: It was obvious that the Federal position was toRobert E. Lee, published in 1886, says: It was obvious that the Federal position was too formidable to be attacked in front with any hope of success; therefore, Lee proceeded to devise a plan by which the position of Hooker might be turned and a point of attack gained from which no danger was apprehended by the Federal commander. General Lee was informed that the Rev. Mr. Lacy, a chaplain in Jackson's corps, was f only column that we can find in this direction. What has become of the other two? Meade appears to be falling back. I am very respectfully, yours, etc., R. E. Lee, General. It must have been soon after sending this that he received General Jackson's message saying the enemy had made a stand-at Chancellorsville, and mo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The address of Hon. John Lamb. (search)
He turned a deaf ear to the appeal. In 1832 the Legislature of Virginia came within one vote of passing a law of emancipation. On page 88, Vol. I, of Henderson's Life of Stonewall Jackson, you will find an interesting letter written by General R. E. Lee, showing what he thought of slavery before the war. Dr. Hunter McGuire, in his able report on School Histories of the South, made to the Grand Camp of Virginia in 1899, states that Lee set free his slaves before the war began, while Grant r as the other, and that for the first, Virginia gave the immortal Washington, and to the last supplied the peerless Lee. Let me give you a pen portrait of our chieftain from an English view point. In a translation of Homer, dedicated to General R. E. Lee, the most stainless of living commanders and except in fortune the greatest, Philip Stanley Worsley of Oxford, wrote: The grand old bard that never dies Receive him in our English tongue; I send thee, but with weeping eyes, The story that
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical memorial of the Charlotte Cavalry. (search)
was Second in Command of the Squadron. When the Brigade advanced the squadron's place was in extreme front, when it retreated in extreme rear. It formed General R. E. Lee's extreme advance guard into Chambersburg, Pa., in 1863. It was General John McCausland's extreme rear guard all night and all day for days together, from Cd, W. Va., July 13. Carrick's Ford, W. Va., July 13. Swamp's Block House, W. Va., November—. Henry Chick killed and Isaac Friend wounded. 1862. with Gen. R. E. Lee in West Virginia. Dry Forks, W. Va., January 8. North Fork, W. Va., January 17. R. M. Friend wounded on scout. Hinkle's Gap, W. Va., February 4. S 27. Charleston, W. Va., October 6. Bulltown, W. Va., October 9. Charleston, W. Va., October 16. Kanawha Falls, W. Va., October 31. 1863. with Gen. R. E. Lee in his advance into Pennsylvania. Middletown, Va., June 11. Winchester, Va., June 13. White Post, Va., June 14. Bunker Hill, Va., June 15. Mart
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
-barrel, and must have done some damage to her. Then we tossed our caps into the air, and shouted our cry of victory. After which Captain Drewry took us in hand, and said: Don't a man leave for the quarters, for I want you to fix up these parapets that have been knocked down, and those sandbags torn to pieces, must be replaced and get ready for them, for the boats will probably be back here again in two hours. But they never returned again. President Jefferson Davis, with General Robert E. Lee, having galloped down from Richmond, came to Gun No. 2, soon after the firing ceased. The General showed us how to replace the sand-bags, and both seemed well pleased with the results of the engagement. Thus the writer of this who had never been absent from duty since the company had been mustered in, must have made it clear to the reader that Captain Drewry, with his company, of most all Chesterfield men—he and most of them plain farmers—had by his indomitable pluck, skill and d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Townsend's Diary—JanuaryMay, 1865. (search)
pers of today have an order from Adjutant General's office announcing the appointment of General Robert E. Lee as General-in-Chief of the Confederate armies. This gives universal satisfaction, and wmbrance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you an affectionate farewell. R. E. Lee. This occasioned quite a discussion in the party, some construing the order as including tany signs of hard service. He created quite a sensation by his coming. He is accompanied by Colonel Lee, of Johnston's army. 3rd. Today has been occupied with the paroling of the officers and m He endorsed upon the list of our names, which we handed him as follows: These men belong to Lee's army, are not within the terms of agreement between Generals Johnston and Sherman, and, consequo quietly to their homes, reporting themselves when circumstances require it, as belonging to General Lee's army. F. Walcott, Major U. S. A. In answer to an inquiry as to whether we were conside
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some war history never published. (search)
of the battery and of the expedition, it was hoped, would be important in relieving our friends and securing recruits from those who wished to join us. Previously General Johnston's attention had been called to possibilities in the Valley of the Shenandoah, and that these and other like things were not done, was surely due to other causes than the policy of the administration, as will appear by the letters hereto annexed: Richmond, Va., August I, 1861. Gen. J. E. Johnston: * * * General Lee has gone to Western Virginia, and I hope may be able to strike a decisive blow in that quarter, or failing in that, will be able to organize and post our troops so as to check the enemy, after which he will return to this place. The movement of Banks will require your attention. It may be a ruse, but if a real movement, where your army has the requisite strength and mobility, you will probably find an opportunity, by a rapid movement through the passes, to strike him in rear or flank,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The patriotism of peace. (search)
f Fitz Lee, Gordon and Wheeler into the realms of charity and forgiveness! All, glory! to the men of the South and the North who strive onward with one mind for the honor and safety of the republic! M. W. Allen, Wilson B. Lynch, John H. Thompson and other soldiers of the Portsmouth Light Artillery, living and dead, whose names are inscribed on this shaft, are the types of manhood who welcome peace. Although this Union was made indissoluble by blood and iron, against their will, Robert E. Lee told them that it must be their country—its flag their flag—and that they should live and labor for its honor and welfare. They have obeyed the injunction of their beloved chieftain since the close of hostilities with the same faithfulness as they were wont to obey his battle orders. They are now heroes in peace as they were heroes in war. They stood up when the sun appeared to stand still over the field of blood and the day to have no ending. These venerable artillerymen, befor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Dahlgren raid. (search)
The Dahlgren raid. A paper read by request before R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V., March 9th, 1906. By Comrade Richard G. Crouch, M. D., who is also a Member and Surgeon of Geo. E. Pickett Camp, C. V. [Our valued friend, from days ante-bellum, is a highly esteemed citizen and successful practitioner of this city. Being a gentleman of means, he delights in benefactions to the needy and those in distress. Upon intimation to him of such wants, relief is immediately extended. His quiet charities, unknown to the public, have been to a multitude of grateful recipients. Company H (originally called Lee's Rangers) 9th Virginia Cavalry, in which he served gallantly, had as its first Captain, Wm. H. F. Lee, subsequently Major-General, and familiarly known as Rooney Lee. A brother of the editor, H. C. Brock, a member of the faculty of Hampden-Sidney College, who was severely wounded at Stony Creek, Dinwiddie County, in 1864, with many valued friends, served also in this noted Co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
r, and well acquainted, and went to work and made up a company, which became distinguished in the First Manassas battle by being in the charge with the Stonewall Brigade that took Ricketts' Battery on the Henry House hill, which ended the fight in the Confederates' favor. And then, too, we were thrown into the balance at Spotsylvania Courthouse, May 12, 1864, after Johnson's division was captured, when all seemed to be lost, and it was our duty to try to retake the works. Then it was General R. E. Lee rode up and offered to lead us, the Forty-ninth Virginia Regiment, Pegram's Brigade, Gordon's Division, and William A. Compton, of Company D, Forty-ninth, led his (General Lee's) horse to the rear; and history knows the rest. And it is a pleasure to me always to assist in having all of the brave Confederates, and more especially the names of those who lost their lives in the struggle of ‘61-65 for constitutional liberty and State's rights, placed upon the Confederate roster, so that
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