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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
Capt. John Milledge. Miscellaneous: Va. Battery, Capt. W. E. Cutshaw; Va. Battery (Dixie Art'y), Capt. W. It. Chapman; Va. Battery (Magruder Art'y), Capt. T. J. Page, Jr.; Va. Battery, Capt. W. H. Rice. cavalry, Maj.-Gen. James E. B. Stuart. Hampton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton: 1st N. C., Col. L. S. Baker; 2d S. C., Col. M. C. Butler: 10th Va.,----; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. P. M. B. Young (w), Maj. William G. Delony; Jeff. Davis (Miss.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. W. T. Martin. Lee's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee: 1st Va., Lieut.-Col. L. T. Brien; 3d Va., Lieut.-Col. John T. Thornton (mo w); 4th Va., Col. W. C. Wickham; 5th Va., Col. Thomas L. Rosser; 9th Va.,----. Robertson's Brigade, Col. Thomas T. Munford: 2d Va., Lieut.-Col. Richard H. Burks; 7th Va., Capt. S. B. Myers; 12th Va., Col. A. W. Harman. Horse Artillery: Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew; S. C. Battery, Capt. J. F. Hart; Va. Battery, Capt. John Pelham. Cavalry and Horse Artillery loss (in the campaign): k
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.77 (search)
attle. There was a tacit truce, and Federal and Confederate burying-parties passed freely between the lines. We had fought an indecisive battle, and although we were, perhaps, in as good a condition to renew the struggle as the enemy were, General Lee recognized the fact that his ulterior plans had been thwarted by this premature engagement, and after a consultation with his corps commanders he determined to withdraw from Maryland. At dark on the night of the 18th the rearward movement begg the entire Confederate army had safely recrossed the Potomac at Shepherdstown. Detained in superintending the removal of a number of the wounded of my division, I was among the last to cross the Potomac. As I rode into the river I passed General Lee, sitting on his horse in the stream, watching the crossing of the wagons and artillery. Returning my greeting, he inquired as to what was still behind. There was nothing but the wagons containing my wounded, and a battery of artillery, all o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Antietam scenes. (search)
Sharpsburg turnpike at a brisk gallop, although I knew that Lee's army was in possession of the thoroughfare by the toll-gateen Antietam and Borodino. The moment had come for dividing Lee's army at its center and crushing it back upon the Potomac ier rout. A. P. Hill, on his way from Harper's Ferry to join Lee, was at that moment fording the Potomac at Shepherdstown. Tay. The arrival of A. P. Hill had a stimulating effect upon Lee's veterans, while the carrying of the bridge and the work acve great encouragement to the Union army. It was plain that Lee was economical in the use of artillery ammunition. In fact,nd then the isolated shots of the pickets. I could see that Lee had contracted his line between Dunker Church and Sharpsburgre issued for a renewal of the attack. Another morning, and Lee was beyond the Potomac. I galloped along the lines where hilook instead — a manifest awakening to the fact that his great opportunity had gone by. Lee had slipped through his fingers
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., A woman's recollections of Antietam. (search)
r Harper's Ferry we had no means of discovering. I remember 1. Shephedstown, from the Maryland side. 2. below Shephierdstown — the Potomac to the Ford by which Lee retreated (shown where the River Narrows): from War-time photographs. how the day wore on, how we staid at the windows until we could not endure the suspense; how lapidation. On Thursday night we heard more than usual sounds of disturbance and movement, and in the morning we found the Confederate army in full retreat. General Lee crossed the Potomac under cover of the darkness, and when the day broke the greater part of his force — or the more orderly portion of it — had gone on toward K been checked, and that it was not believed he would attempt to cross the river at once — a surmise that proved to be correct. The country grew more composed. General Lee lay near Leetown, some seven miles south of us, and General McClellan rested quietly in Maryland. On Sunday we were able to have some short church services fo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The case of Fitz John Porter. (search)
he crest of the hills which descend to Dawkin's Branch, his advance encountered Longstreet's, already in occupation of the opposite slope. The board of officers say in their report: General Porter's-conduct was adjudged [by the court-martial] upon the assumption that not more than one division under Longstreet had arrived on the field, and that Porter had no considerable force in his front. The fact is that Longstreet, with four divisions of 25,000 According to Col. Marshall of Gen. Lee's staff, 30,000. men, was there on the field before Porter arrived with his two divisions of 9000 men; that the Confederate general-in-chief was there in person at least two or three hours before the commander of the Army of Virginia himself arrived on the field, and that Porter with his two divisions saved the Army of Virginia that day from the disaster naturally due to the enemy's earlier preparations for battle. If the 4: 30 order had been promptly delivered a very grave responsibilit