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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the cavalry in Mississippi, from January to March, 1864.-report of General S. D. Lee. (search)
Operations of the cavalry in Mississippi, from January to March, 1864.-report of General S. D. Lee. Headquarters Lee's cavalry, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, April 18th, 1864. Colonel,--The following is submitted as my report of the operations of the cavalry under my command during the recent campaign in Mississippi. During the lLee's cavalry, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, April 18th, 1864. Colonel,--The following is submitted as my report of the operations of the cavalry under my command during the recent campaign in Mississippi. During the latter part of January the enemy commenced to concentrate a large force at Vicksburg, bringing large reinforcements from Memphis and above, and evacuating the Mississippi and Central railroad. To oppose this force, Jackson's division was in position as follows: Ross's Texas brigade was guarding the Yazoo river and Mississippi Ceing orders, under fire frequently. The loss of the enemy was about 400 prisoners and 300 killed and wounded. Enclosed are the reports of the General officers of my command, and a list of killed, wounded, &c. I am, Colonel, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Major-General. Lieutenant-Colonel T. M. Jack, A. A. G., Demopolis, Ala.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The defence of battery Gregg-General Lane's reply to General Harris. (search)
h May, 1867, I furnished information about my command to General Lee, at his request, through General Wilcox, and called atte accompanied my statement. I afterwards wrote direct to General Lee, enclosed a copy of my last official report and copies oone my command in the articles that had been published. General Lee acknowledged the receipt of my letter with enclosures, aone's division, I made the same statement that I did to Generals Lee and Wilcox. Lastly, in the January No., 1877, of the Sbrigade of North Carolinians. General Wilcox, to whom General Lee ordered General Harris to report on that occasion, says ficial report at Appomattox Court-house, in obedience to General Lee's order, I made no allusion whatever to any other commann the different batteries along it. This was reported to General Lee. He further states that Harris's brigade, of Mahone's dng on that part of the line, and I am satisfied that had General Lee lived to complete his work, he would have done justice t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's advance on Meridian — report of General W. H. Jackson. (search)
emy, near Brandon; Adams's brigade accompanied Major-General Lee on the flank of the enemy. There was but litthe day before, upon hearing of the approach of Major-General Lee's command. On the 24th, in compliance with oroving. I beg leave to call the attention of Major-General Lee to the part performed by Lieutenant Harvey and have been done was executed by the command of Major-General Lee. My thanks are due General Ferguson for his 23rd of February, I received an order from Major-General S. D. Lee, commanding cavalry west of Alabama, to movenemy and intercept him there, he meeting up with General Lee delivered the message to him; I withdrew the brigr order to Jackson, when I received an order from General Lee to move my column out on the road leading from Jaeek, four miles north of Jackson, I came up with General Lee's Quarter-master in charge of all the trains, halnd, took position, and at this time was joined by General Lee, who informed me that General Ferguson was guardi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battery Gregg-reply to General N. H. Harris. (search)
e, inaccurate accounts of which I had read in history, Swinton's Army of the Potomac. biography, Cooke's Life of General Lee. and newspapers. Vicksburg Times. And as I wrote to correct, in part, the misstatements of others, it was my purposd into Whitworth for the reason he gave, and there being also more artillery in it. Again, he states he was ordered by General Lee a few minutes after the fall of Gregg to retire from Whitworth, at least he so understood it. He retired from that work by my orders. General Lee would not have sent him such an order without its passing through me, as I was in charge of that part of the field. The order reached General Harris a few minutes after the fall of Gregg, but it was dispatched to him beeceive orders of any kind or from any source, unless they came through me, or were given by the corps commander, or by General Lee in person. He had been ordered to report to me by the commanding General, and I had assigned him to the command of Wh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cavalry operations in North Alabama.--report of General S. D. Lee. (search)
Cavalry operations in North Alabama.--report of General S. D. Lee. Headquarters Crane Creek, (ten miles West of Tuscumbia), October 30th, 1863, 7:30 A. M. Colonel,--I have the honor to report for the information of the General, that my command attacked the enemy at day-light yesterday morning, and after a brisk skirmish, I discovered that the enemy were in force at their camp near Cherokee Station. Their tents were standing, and my scouts could see no movement indicating breaking up ed in this direction. They are much in need of clothing, shoes, &c. I will, however, remain as long as I can be of service, or until I receive orders from General Johnston. If I am to remain in this department, I should be informed as early as practicable, though I am of opinion that a large cavalry force will not be needed in this Valley very long. I am, Colonel, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Major-General. Lieutenant-Colonel Geo. W. Brent, Assistant Adjutant-General Army of Tennessee.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
and many other officers, that it behaved in all of these fights with its usual gallantry. General Lee compliments cook's, McRae's and Lane's brigades for their gallantry at Reames's Station. As General Lee, in person, put General Conner in command of my brigade during my absence, I was required on my return to report to him in person to have General Conner relieved. It was during this visit to Army Headquarters that General Lee told me North Carolina had cause to be proud of Cooke's, McRae's and Lane's brigades, for, by their gallantry at Reames's Station, they had not only put her referred to: [from the Wilmington journal, 1864.] Tribute to North Carolina.--letter from General Lee. We have been permitted to make the following extract of a letter from General Lee to GoveGeneral Lee to Governor Vance, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their glorious victory achieved at Reames's Station. This tribute from the great hero of this revolution is the highest honor that could be pa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee compliments cook's, McRae's and Lane's brigades for their gallantry at Reames's Station. (search)
General Lee compliments cook's, McRae's and Lane's brigades for their gallantry at Reames's Station. As General Lee, in person, put General Conner in command of my brigade during my absence, I was required on my return to report to him in person to have General Conner relieved. It was during this visit to Army Headquarters thGeneral Lee, in person, put General Conner in command of my brigade during my absence, I was required on my return to report to him in person to have General Conner relieved. It was during this visit to Army Headquarters that General Lee told me North Carolina had cause to be proud of Cooke's, McRae's and Lane's brigades, for, by their gallantry at Reames's Station, they had not only put her but the whole Confederacy under a debt of gratitude which could never be repaid. He also told me, at the same time, that he had written to Governor Vance, expreGeneral Lee told me North Carolina had cause to be proud of Cooke's, McRae's and Lane's brigades, for, by their gallantry at Reames's Station, they had not only put her but the whole Confederacy under a debt of gratitude which could never be repaid. He also told me, at the same time, that he had written to Governor Vance, expressing his high appreciation of their services. I suppose the following is an extract from the letter referred to:
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), [from the Wilmington journal, 1864.] (search)
[from the Wilmington journal, 1864.] Tribute to North Carolina.--letter from General Lee. We have been permitted to make the following extract of a letter from General Lee to Governor Vance, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their glorious victory achieved at Reames's Station. This tribute from the great hero of this revolution is the highest honor that could be paid to North Carolina. Let every soldier treasure it up as a memento of inestimable value: Headquarters army General Lee to Governor Vance, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their glorious victory achieved at Reames's Station. This tribute from the great hero of this revolution is the highest honor that could be paid to North Carolina. Let every soldier treasure it up as a memento of inestimable value: Headquarters army of Northern Virginia, August 29th, 1864. His Excellency Z. B. Vance, Governor of North Carolina: * * * * * * * * * I have been frequently called upon to mention the services of North Carolina soldiers in this army, but their gallantry and conduct were never more deserving the admiration than in the engagement at Reames's Station on the 25th instant. The brigades of Generals Cook, McRae and Lane, the last under the temporary command of General Conner, advanced through a thick abattis of f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's division. (search)
do not justify this assertion. On the contrary, they show that the discipline of the Army of Northern Virginia was never equal to that of the Army of the Potomac, though in fire and elan it was superior. I could always rely on my army, said General Lee at the time he surrendered its remnant at Appomattox Courthouse, I could always rely on my army for fighting, but its discipline was poor. At the time of the Maryland invasion Lee lost above twenty-five thousand men by straggling, and he exclLee lost above twenty-five thousand men by straggling, and he exclaimed, with tears, My army is ruined by straggling. Nothing could better illustrate the high state of discipline of the Army of the Potomac than its conduct in such retreats as that on the Peninsula, and in Pope's campaign, and in such incessant fighting as the Rapidan campaign of 1864. This comparison is not suggested as any reflection upon the fame of the Federal army, for such reflections upon its adversary are unbecoming to either, and the list of casualties of the Federals (not their l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Hood's Tennessee campaign. (search)
t in motion. General Hood commanded the expedition, with three army corps of infantry commanded by Generals Stewart, S. D. Lee and Cheatham, with Forrest in command of the cavalry. The entire force numbered about thirty thousand. It was as gallite side of the river, which could not easily be crossed under the fire of Schofield's guns. So he concluded to leave General Lee, with two divisions at Columbia, who was ordered to make demonstrations as if to cross the river, while he would crossft with their battle-flags waving in the mellow sunlight, and we felt that a long-sought opportunity had at last arrived. Lee's guns at Columbia kept up lively music, admonishing us that he was meeting his part of the contract. We were satisfied td the river that morning about four miles above Columbia, Cheatham in front, followed by Stewart and Johnson's division of Lee's corps. We had but little artillery, as the roads were too rough for moving it. It was about 3 or 4 o'clock when ever
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