hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 18, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for S. D. Lee or search for S. D. Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: May 18, 1864., [Electronic resource], Operations around Richmond — the battle not renewed yesterday — firing at Chaffin's Bluff — another steamer destroyed in St. John's river, &c. (search)
t. This is the third steamer that has met this fate in St. Johns river in the last forty days. Samuel Jones, Maj Gen. A raiding party in Mississippi. The Adjutant General yesterday received the following official dispatch from General S. D. Lee: Demopolis, May 16, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper. A raiding party from Vicksburg, infantry and cavalry, moved on the Central Railroad, and while Gen. Adams was fighting their main body, near Pickens Station, a cavalry force burnt Bo A raiding party from Vicksburg, infantry and cavalry, moved on the Central Railroad, and while Gen. Adams was fighting their main body, near Pickens Station, a cavalry force burnt Boughan's Station and several inconsiderable trestles. Captain Younger, with one hundred and fifty men of Wood's regiment, handsomely repulsed two regiments of infantry from the railroad bridge and saved it. The enemy retreated to Yazoo City. The railroad is but slightly injured. S. D. Lee, Major General.
The Daily Dispatch: May 18, 1864., [Electronic resource], Operations around Richmond — the battle not renewed yesterday — firing at Chaffin's Bluff — another steamer destroyed in St. John's river, &c. (search)
Gentlemen prominently connected with the Government are to-day in good spirits in view of recent military events in Virginia, and consider our final triumph merely a matter of time. Movements are in progress which will soon be publicly demonstrated, forming a part of the general plan of the campaign, and looking to its success. They had not heard of Sigels' whipping at Washington. A telegram says: It was believed in the army that Sigel, having made forces marches, had destroyed Lee's railroad connections with Lynchburg, and that Sheridan had done the same to his communications with Richmond. On Tuesday General Rice, commander of the 2d brigade, 4th division, 5th corps, was seriously, wounded in the leg, while leading his men in a charge. The wound was of such a nature that it become necessary to amputating the limb, from the effects of which he has since died. Gen Meade publishes an address to his troops, in which he congratulates them out their bravery, and
From General Lee's army. [from our Own Correspondent.] Army of Northern Virginia, Spotsylvania C. H., May 13, 1864. On yesterday was fought in front of this modest little village — henceforth to be famous through all coming time--one of the fiercest and most obstinate battles of modern times. It commenced at daylight, and raged and roared with tremendous fury until two o'clock in the afternoon, when the enemy retired from the bloody conflict. Grant made the attack again, as he did at the Wilder uses, and gained a considerable advantage by the suddenness and vigor of the assault enemy in the day; but with this exception, he was repulsed with a loss that will carry mourning to thousands of Northern and European hearthstones, and dismay and confusion to the tyrants and demagogues whose hosts he leads. The Confederates failed at one point only — partly from accident, party from mistake, and partly, I fear, from lack of spirits; but on all other parts of the field they were v