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as, without amendment. On the twentieth, Mr. Brown, of Missouri, called up the resolution, and proposed an amendment, tendering the thanks of Congress to Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee. The amendment was received and ordered to be printed, On the twenty-first, the Senate, on motion of Mr. Wilson, proceeded to consider the joint resolution. On motion of Mr. Brown, it was amended, by adding that the thanks of Congress be tendered to Captain S. Phillips Lee, and to the officers and seamen under his command, for the skill, gallantry, and good conduct exhibited by them in cooperation with the land forces under command of Major-General Thomas in the great and decisivechenck, from the Committee on Military Affairs, reported back the joint resolution, with a recommendation that the amendment tendering the thanks of Congress to Captain Lee be not concurred in; and the amendment was not agreed to. The Senate, on motion of Mr. Brown, receded from its amendment, and the joint resolution was passed
rn to the rear to cook, &c. I am most happy to state I had no occasion to carry into effect the order to shoot all stragglers who refused to go forward, or if caught a second time, upon the evidence of two witnesses, to shoot them. Had I occasion to carry it into effect, it certainly should have been executed to the very letter. During the thirteenth and fourteenth I received and placed under guard three hundred and twenty-four prisoners of war, which I sent to Richmond by order of General Lee; eleven of them were commissioned officers and paroled by me; the balance I took names, regiments, brigades, and corps, as far as possible, in obedience to your order. December sixteenth, I received one hundred and nine prisoners of war, which I paroled and sent to Guineas Depot, under command of Captain Upshur, with instructions to have them forwarded by railroad to Richmond, if possible, which orders were carried into effect. During the same day I went through Dr. Black's and Whiteh
. We kept wishing and hoping they would dry up, as much to get out of the heat as the danger, for the latter we thought little of, after they had fired a while; but Lee had an object to attain by throwing away so much ammunition. He calculated by concentrating his fire on our centre that he could use up our batteries, drive away athe position we occupied, we were defeated, and so badly that I much doubt our ability to stop their progress towards Baltimore, or anywhere they chose to go. But Mr. Lee got fooled for once, and threw away a mighty sight of good ammunition, and derived little benefit from it. Well, after firing about two hours and a half, they sla did handsomely. The rebels, now seeing the position they had got in, threw away their guns and gave themselves up by hundreds, and thus ended the great assault of Lee on the third. Not enough went back of Ricketts's division to make a good line of skirmishers. Another line came out on the left shortly afterwards, but they were
on the south side of the James River. It is of especial interest as presenting the theatre of operations of one wing of Lee's army, under Lieutenant-General Longstreet, Hill, and Hood, from April tenth to May third, 1863. Although Hill was not pe siege of Little Washington on the fifteenth, and despatched his troops to Suffolk. Longstreet himself may have joined Lee and Jackson at the crisis of Chancellorsville, or soon after, although his servants and horses fell into our hands near Suof, succeeded in reaching the Rapidan, in spite of the bold operations of Stoneman. The relative strength of Hooker and Lee is given by the New York Tribune of March twenty-six, 1864, in an editorial on the Richmond Campaigns, as follows: Hooker, one hundred and twenty-three thousand fighting men present for duty; Lee, forty-nine thousand seven hundred men. At this time I do not purpose expressing an opinion respecting the accuracy of the estimates of the Tribune, but it is due the littl
ly executed, was something for a brave man to face. I saw men, who had braved every danger, quail under the idea of being thus selected for execution. These men have never been executed yet, and they never will. For our government holds General Lee and Captain Winder in their stead, and we say to them, just as you deal with Flynn and Sawyer so we will deal with Lee and Winder. The third scene that transpired in Libby Prison was in regard to Colonel Powell, who, in an engagement with tLee and Winder. The third scene that transpired in Libby Prison was in regard to Colonel Powell, who, in an engagement with the rebels, had been shot through the breast, and it was supposed that he would die. The Confederates came upon him where he was lying in his gore, and wanted to butcher him in cold blood. He was sent to Richmond and put into the hospital. He had been in the hospital about two weeks, when the man Turner took him down into the basement of the building, and opened the door of a dark damp cell, and said to him, Get in there. Colonel Powell said, Sir, for what am I to be put in there? Turner sai
r, Commanding Land Forces in North Carolina. S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral, commanding N. A. B. Sqes, Secretary of the Navy. Letter of Admiral S. P. Lee. flag-ship, North Atlantic Blockadinor to be, Sir, Very respectfully, yours, S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral, commanding N. A. B. Sq have the honor to be Respectfully yours, S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral, commanding N. A. B. Sq, and Senior Officer of the Sound. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding N. A. B. Squadron. ervant, Melancton Smith, Captain. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding N. A. B. Squadron. e officers whom he recommends for promotion. S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral. Report of Lieut.-Cdone well their part in this gallant action. S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral. Report of Engineerrvant, F. A. Roe, Lieutenant-Commander. Admiral S. P. Lee, Com'ding N. A. B. Squadron, James Riverd Senior Officer, in Sounds of N. C. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding N. A. B. Squadron. [1 more...]
commend this party for their courage, zeal, and unwearied exertion in carrying out a project that had for some time been under consideration. The plan of executing it was their own, except in some minor details, and although defeated in their purpose, (by accidentally fouling a schooner,) I deem it my imperative duty to recommend John W. Lloyd and Charles Baldwin to be promoted to a higher grade; and that all receive the medal of honor and pecuniary reward awarded by act of Congress for distinguished services. Four deserters from the rebel ram Albemarle were brought on board by the picket boat yesterday, but I cannot, without delaying the army boat, communicate the intelligence they bring. They state, however, that the ram Neuse is afloat, and ready in all respects for service. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Melancton Smith, Captain and Senior Officer, in Sounds of N. Carolina. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee. Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
nor to be, Sir, Very respectfully, yours, S. P. Lee, A. R. Admiral, commanding N. A. B. SquadronF. Butler, Major-General, commanding. Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding N. A. B. Squadron. Memes will be employed. Respectfully, yours, S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral, commanding N. A. B. Sq commanding officer. Respectfully, yours, S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral, commanding N. A. B. Sq at sunrise tomorrow. Respectfully yours, S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral, commanding N. A. B. Sqommanding U. S. Steamer Minnesota. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding N. A. B. Squadron. lliams, Acting Master, commanding. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding N. A. B. Squadron. Volunteer-Lieutenant, commanding. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding N. A. B. Squadron, NewP. Fyffe, Lieutenant, commanding. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding North Atlantic Blockadmpbell, Acting Master, commanding. Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, Commanding North Atlantic Squadro[2 more...]
the time specified above. General Humphrey's division, under General Miles, also advanced against the enemy about the same period on our right, but the movement was not made in close connection with mine. It is my intention to enter more into details when I receive the official reports of my division commanders. At 3.40 P. M., I wrote, from the White Oak Road, the following dispatch to General Webb: We have driven the enemy, I think, into his breastworks. The prisoners report General Lee here to-day, and also that their breastworks are filled with troops. We have prisoners from a portion of Pickett's and Johnson's divisions. General Chamberlain's brigade acted with much gallantry in their advance, capturing nearly the entire Fifty-sixth Virginia regiment, with its flags. We met with but little opposition in this advance, so that only this one brigade was earnestly engaged. The loss to the corps, in killed and wounded, from the morning of March 29th to the close
fficer, of the same regiment, and Major Nash, in command of the seven companies of the Forty-first Alabama, all came under my observation. In each I remarked constancy, gallantry, and coolness. In the afternoon, Colonel Stansell, of the Forty-first; Lieutenant-Colonel Wickliffe, in command of the Ninth, after Colonel Caldwell was wounded, and Captain Gillam, acting field officer, of the same regiment, attracted my notice, and but confirmed the good account I had of them in the morning. Captain Lee, of the Second Kentucky, though too unwell to endure the fatigue throughout the day, acted as field officer with his accustomed bravery in the charges made by the left in the morning. It is the highest praise I can possibly bestow on the officers of the brigade, to say they proved themselves, in nearly every case, worthy of their commands. Of the staff of Brigadier-General Helm, I take pleasure in bearing testimony in behalf of, and making special mention of, Captain Fayette Hewitt,
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