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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 209 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 147 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 85 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 82 6 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 81 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 28 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 10 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Stephen D. Lee or search for Stephen D. Lee in all documents.

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ge of which was completely destroyed, and an engineer regiment, under command of Colonel Flad, engaged in its repair. Quite a considerable force of the enemy was in our front, near Tuscumbia, to resist our advance. It was commanded by General Stephen D. Lee, and composed of Roddy's and Furgeson's brigades, with irregular cavalry, amounting in the aggregate to about five thousand. In person I moved from Corinth to Burnsville on the eighteenth, and to Iuka on the nineteenth of October. Ome of them sixty feet long. The expedition crossed the river and drove off the rebels, taking their boats. From the best information to be obtained, there were two small regiments of cavalry and one battery on the other side, doing picket-duty. Lee and Roddy reported as having gone to Mississippi. Major-General Sherman, commanding army of the Tennessee, having been ordered, with the Fifteenth corps, to this point, to participate in the operations against the enemy, reached Bridgeport with
ackson. After crossing the Big Black, both columns had skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry at intervals until we arrived at Jackson. The cavalry belonged to S. D. Lee and Ferguson's commands. These skirmishes, though in some cases severe, caused our forces but little delay, as they speedily drove the enemy back. In this day' from fourteen to fifteen thousand men. Nine thousand. infantry under the command of Generals Loring and French, and five thousand cavalry, under the command of S. D. Lee, Wirt Adams, and Ferguson. In an advantageous position this force, if concentrated, might perhaps have made a stand and caused us considerable delay, but the reonsiderable loss. Their forces, consisting of about seven thousand men, commanded by Generals Wirt Adams, Ross, and Ferguson, and the whole under command of General S. D. Lee, then fell back to a commanding position on the west side of Baker's Creek, where our cavalry force encountered them in the afternoon, and were unable to dis
to have been wanting in tact, energy, skill, or judgment. The plans of the astute Sherman seem to have been comprehended and baffled, his movements broken down, and his army forced to retreat. General Sherman left Vicksburgh with forty-five thousand men, ten thousand of whom were sent up the Yazoo. The rest marched in one column through Jackson, into the heart of Mississippi. This was composed of infantry and artillery. This column was first confronted by the cavalry commanded by General S. D. Lee; then by the small infantry force at the disposal of the Commanding General. After crossing Pearl River, Lee's cavalry was thrown upon its flanks and rear, and with such success as to prevent all foraging. The stores in depots of all the railroads between Pearl River and the Tombigbee were sent east, and the whole of the rolling stock of those roads was placed beyond the enemy's reach. This being accomplished, the Commanding General placed the infantry on the east side of the Tomb
Rebel reports and Narratives. General S. D. Lee's report. Demopolis, February 24. Headquarters, Starkville, Miss., February 22. Lieutenant-General Polk: Major-General Forrest reports, at nine A. M., yesterday evening, two miles south of Pontotoc, we have had severe fighting all day with the enemy. The engagement closed about dark. We have killed about forty of the enemy and captured about one hundred prisoners. Our loss is not known, but is not so heavy as that of the enemy. Thre forced to make repeated stands to hold us in check, and to save their pack-mules, etc., from a stampede. The fight closed with a grand cavalry charge of the enemy's whole force. We repulsed them with heavy loss, and completely routed them. S. D. Lee. Leonidas Polk, Lieutenant-General. Atlanta Confederacy account. Demopolis, February 22, 1864. News from the front grows stale. The enemy having prospected as far south as De Soto, on the Mobile road, seem to be hesitating as to t