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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 209 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 147 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 85 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 82 6 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 81 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 28 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 10 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Stephen D. Lee or search for Stephen D. Lee in all documents.

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f Carrolton and Powder Springs. About the same time President Davis visited Macon and his army at Palmetto, and made harangues referring to an active campaign against us. Hood still remained in command of the confederate forces, with Cheatham, S. D. Lee, and Stewart commanding his three corps, and Wheeler in command of his cavalry, which had been largely reinforced. My cavalry consisted of two divisions; one was stationed at Decatur, under command of Brigadier-General Garrard; the other, co 2300 rifle muskets, calibre, 69; 5000 lances, 1500 cutlasses, 30,000 rounds of small-arm ammunition, 5470 rounds of artillery ammunition, 20,000 pounds of powder. Captured in Fort McAllister, Beautiere, Rose Dew, Bartow, Thunderbolt, Jackson, Lee, Boggs, Brown, Water Battery, opposite Fort Jackson, Lanton Battery, in the lines around the city of Savannah, and in the city of Savannah: Artillery.--167 smooth-bore guns, 35 rifled guns, 7 mortars; total number of guns, 209. Artillery Car
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore), Captured and destroyed by the left wing, at Milledgeville, Georgia. (search)
Captured and destroyed by the left wing, at Milledgeville, Georgia. 2300 rifle muskets, calibre, 69; 5000 lances, 1500 cutlasses, 30,000 rounds of small-arm ammunition, 5470 rounds of artillery ammunition, 20,000 pounds of powder. Captured in Fort McAllister, Beautiere, Rose Dew, Bartow, Thunderbolt, Jackson, Lee, Boggs, Brown, Water Battery, opposite Fort Jackson, Lanton Battery, in the lines around the city of Savannah, and in the city of Savannah: Artillery.--167 smooth-bore guns, 35 rifled guns, 7 mortars; total number of guns, 209. Artillery Carriages.--76 barbette, 1 casemate, 6 siege, 41 field; total number of carriages, 124. Artillery Ammunition.--19,843 for smooth-bore guns, 1903 for rifled guns, 17 for mortars; total number of rounds of artillery ammunition, 21,763. Small Arms.--183 various kinds. Infantry Ammunition.--8000 musket cartridges, calibre, 59 ; 7500 musket buck and ball cartridges, calibre, 69; 11,000 elongated ball cartridges, calibre, 57;
ten P. M. on the fourteenth, and reported to General Schofield by direct order of General Thomas. To show more fully the object of the movement of my division, I transmit herewith orders and telegrams from Major-Generals Thomas and Rousseau, marked A to Zzz, also my report by telegraph numbered from 1 to Zzz. October fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth, remained at Chattanooga. October eighteenth, in compliance with orders from General Schofield, moved at seven A. M., bivouacked at Lee and Gordon's Mills, marching (12) twelve miles. October nineteenth, moved at eight A. M., marching thirteen miles, bivouacking at La Fayette. October twentieth, moved at six A. M., marched thirteen miles, bivouacking near Enthittaga Springs or Chattooga River. October twenty-first, moved at six A. M., and marching sixteen miles, bivouacking at Dougherty plantation on Broomtown Valley road. October twenty-second, moved at six A. M., marching eight miles, bivouacked at Gaylesville,
Doc. 22.-operations of General Lee's army. Official Confederate reports. Message of Jefferson Davis. communication from the Secretary of War, covering General Lee's report of the operations of the army of Northerith to transmit, for the information of Congress, General Lee's report of operations! of the army of Northern tive narrative might be formed in accordance with General Lee's written request. I am, sir, very respectfull servant, James A. Seddon, Secretary of War. General Lee's Report. headquarters army of Northern Virg withdraw with loss. Some of the batteries of Colonel S. D. Lee's battalion were ordered to aid those of Colonn reserve near the turnpike. The batteries of Colonel S. D. Lee took the position occupied the day before by Crs being thrown forward about the same time by Colonel S. D. Lee, under their well-directed and destructive firerve. The battalion of light artillery, under Colonel S. D. Lee, will take the same route. The cavalry, under
was engaged. I waited half an hour without any intimation of this attack, and sent a courier to General Ewell, to say I awaited the movement on our left. Half an hour afterward, I sent another courier with the same message, and, soon after, Lieutenant Lee, of my staff, to say that if the attack was made on their flank, to divert their attention from my movement, I thought I could overpower the enemy in front, but that it would be injudicious to do so alone, as I could plainly see three batterire. To Colonel Mercer, for his judicious movements during the day, and to Colonel Canty, for his skilful retreat from picket and prompt flank manoeuvre, I think special praise is due, as well as to my staff, Captain Hall and Lieutenants McKim and Lee, for the promptness and coolness displayed in conveying orders. I would also call the attention of the Major-General to the services performed on this occasion and previously, by Captain Brown, of company A, Sixteenth Mississippi, who, with porti
hich that practised artillerist, Lieutenant-Colonel Stephen D. Lee, had placed in advance, in a comWhilst with General Cobb, an Aid-de-camp of General Lee, Major Taylor, came up and informed me thatfter, I received a communication, also from General Lee, through Major Bloomfield, directing me to apidly to the front, and reported myself to Generals Lee and Longstreet. General Lee directed me, asement of General Magruder in explanation of General Lee's remarks on General Magruder's report of the Federal army were certainly retreating. General Lee answered the note, and stated that the enem note. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Colonel Artillery, commanding Fourth cavalr report complete. Respectfully submitted. S. D. Lee, Colonel Artillery and Acting Chief of Magruultimo, with my three companies, to Lieutenant-Colonel S. D. Lee, chief of artillery for General Magso far as his artillery was concerned, Lieutenant-Colonel Lee, chief of artillery, of General Magrud[24 more...]
n the original order. During the day, Colonel S. D. Lee, with his reserve artillery, placed in ttime, I was informed that a portion of Colonel Stephen D. Lee's battalion had taken the place of theis former position, when he was directed by General Lee to an elevated and commanding position on ttal wounded, six. Respectfully submitted. S. D. Lee, Colonel Artillery, C. S. A., commanding Battalion Light Artillery. Report of Colonel S. D. Lee of battle of Sharpsburg. headquarters y respectfully, Your obedient servant, Stephen D. Lee, Colonel of Artillery C. S. A., commandinsult of movement on your left? (Signed,) General Lee. [answer.] To General Lee: So faGeneral Lee: So far enemy appear to be trying to get possession of a piece of woods to withdraw out of our sight. you still want reinforcements? (Signed,) General Lee. Some half hour elapses, and General Javing way. (Signed,) General Jackson. General Lee now prepares to move, and sends the followi[16 more...]
r arrival at this place. The cavalry force under Brigadier-General Lee, the detachment of the Thirteenth corps under Brigag the advance, proceeded in the direction of Pleasant Hill. Lee's advance was accompanied by severe skirmishing. On the seventh instant, General Lee drove the enemy through Pleasant Hill, and encamped on a stream about eight miles beyond, toward ing General, joined me on the sixth instant, and visited General Lee on the seventh. General Ransom's command arrived at P seventh instant, I was informed by Colonel Clarke, that General Lee was anxious to have a brigade of infantry sent out to hik P. M., I was directed to send a brigade of infantry to General Lee, to reach him by daylight. The brigade started at threearched with the remainder of his command to encamp where General Lee encamped the night before. General Emory was directed td there, about ten o'clock A. M., I received a note from General Lee asking for another brigade of infantry on account of the