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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 209 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 147 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 85 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 82 6 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 81 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 28 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 10 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stephen D. Lee or search for Stephen D. Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Officers of Gen. R. E. Lee's staff. (search)
h the data furnished by General Marcus J. Wright, of the War Department in Washington. As far as I know, it is now the most correct list extant, and you can safely have it published. With kind wishes, your comrade and friend, (Signed) Stephen D. Lee. General Lee's first service was in the western part of the State of Virginia, where he was attended by two aides-de-camp, Colonel John A. Washington and Captain Walter H. Taylor. Colonel John Augustine Washington was killed at ValleyGeneral Lee's first service was in the western part of the State of Virginia, where he was attended by two aides-de-camp, Colonel John A. Washington and Captain Walter H. Taylor. Colonel John Augustine Washington was killed at Valley Mountain, September, 1861. During his three month's service in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, he had with him in addition to his aide, Captain Walter H. Taylor, Lieutenant Colonel Wm. G. Gill, Ordnance Officer; Captain Thornton A. Washington, A. A. & I. General; Major A. L. Long, Chief of Artillery; Captain Joseph C. Ives, Chief of Engineers; Captain Joseph Manigault, Vol. A. D. C.; Captain John N. Maffitt, Naval A. D. C. In March, 1862, when under a special act of Congress, Genera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
econd commander of the battery, was made by General Stephen D. Lee—Miss Johnston and Mr. Anderson had been ware. Captain J. C. McNeilly, who served gallantly in Lee's Army, in Virginia, the editor of the Vicksburg Heraed with Pickett at Gettysburg. They surrendered with Lee at Appomattox. Others of these Botetourt men, foughtthem back. Johnston and Beauregard took command, and Lee came for several days to look things over. Day and ntwo to one. But Jackson stood like a stone wall, and Lee's men listened to their leader, and the 2nd and 11th tteries. At about half past 10 the Federals attacked Lee and Cumming. They were repulsed. Reinforced, they mright and Colonel Cockrell on the left. Supported by Lee and by a part of Cumming's Brigade, these charged theons on the right centre; Cumming the left centre, and Lee, reinforced by Waul's Texas Legion, the extreme left.allantry by Generals Pemberton, Stevenson, Burton and Lee, became chief of artillery, Stevenson's Division, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
e run off and enlisted anyway. The company was a pretty green one, including the captain, lieutenants, drivers and all the members of the battery; they had had little or no experience in drilling, in caring for the horses attached to the guns, and in every respect was a very crude organization. After General Lee had driven General McClellan from the gates of Richmond and began to move towards Maryland in the first campaign of invasion across the Potomac, the boy company reported to Colonel S. D. Lee, who had a battalion of three batteries of artillery, all of whom had seen service in battle. When on the march towards the battlefield of Second Manassas the boy company reported to make the fourth battery of the battalion. When the battery reported Colonel Lee was shocked that such a company of immature boys should be sent to him while on the march against the enemy. He, however, took the situation in at once, took hold of the company and drilled and disciplined it in season and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
y one we answer the final roll-call. Our monuments we bequeath to posterity as a perpetual legacy to commemorate the sacrifices made to principles that are imperishable—constitutional government! As one of the survivors I read with interest the reminiscences of the veterans of the late Civil War. The perusal of the recent articles in your Confederate Column has brought to mind my experience at the battle of Malvern Hill, the culmination of the Seven Days Battles around Richmond. General Stephen D. Lee, then Colonel of Artillery, in his report to General Magruder, says: The enemy's artillery was admirably handled in this action, and is admitted to have been the most terrible artillery fire during the war. Some conception of this terrible fire may be formed when it is stated that the captain of one of the Federal batteries engaged reports that his battery alone exploded four hundred rounds of shell, five hundred and fifteen rounds of spherical case and sixty-six rounds of caniste